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I have a generic class and a derived class as following.

public class GenericClass<T> { ... }

public class DerivedClass : GenericClass<SomeType> { ... }

How do I find the derived class via reflection? I have tried both ways below, but doesn't seem to work.

System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes().Where(t => typeof(GenericClass<>).IsAssignableFrom(t));

System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes().Where(t => t.IsSubclassOf(typeof(GenericClass<>));
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted
var result = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()
    .GetTypes()
    .Where(t => t.BaseType != null && t.BaseType.IsGenericType && 
                t.BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(GenericClass<>));
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Only goes 1 level deep, but anything more than that is a huge pain. +1 indeed! –  dlev Aug 12 '11 at 18:23
1  
Thanks for this, works great. One small thing; if you add a check for t.BaseType being null, then it's perfect. –  weilin8 Aug 12 '11 at 18:36
1  
Hmm, what type did you declare that didn't have a base type? I can only think of System.Object –  Hans Passant Aug 12 '11 at 18:40
    
When I ran that directly, I got an object null exception when viewing the result. I didn't look into detail which type was causing the problem since I am pulling all the types from executing assembly. But once I check for t.BaseType being null, the error went away. Nonetheless, that was a great help. Thanks. –  weilin8 Aug 12 '11 at 18:45
    
Added an answer below that will recursively find all the derived generic and non-generic classes. –  Kim Jul 10 '14 at 16:10

It's a bit more complex than that. t.BaseType may return null (e.g. when t is an interface). Also note that the Type.IsSubclassOf method does not work for generic types! If you are dealing with a generic type you should use the GetTypeDefinition method. I recently blogged about how to get all derived types of a class. Here's an IsSubclass method that works for generics, too:

public static bool IsSubclassOf(Type type, Type baseType)
{
    if (type == null || baseType == null || type == baseType)
        return false;

    if (baseType.IsGenericType == false)
    {
        if (type.IsGenericType == false)
            return type.IsSubclassOf(baseType);
    }
    else
    {
        baseType = baseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
    }

    type = type.BaseType;
    Type objectType = typeof(object);
    while (type != objectType && type != null)
    {
        Type curentType = type.IsGenericType ?
            type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() : type;
        if (curentType == baseType)
            return true;

        type = type.BaseType;
     }

    return false;
}
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Who are you responding to? –  Robert Harvey Jun 8 '12 at 18:02
    
I'm responding to Hans Passant about "t.BaseType.IsGenericType". t.BaseType may return null if t is an interface for example. –  Pavel Vladov Jun 8 '12 at 20:45

Because I needed to recursively find all derived types I wrote this code and will share with anyone who may need it:

    public void ListAllDerviedTypes()
    {
        Type entityType = typeof(TableAdapter);
        Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom(entityType.Assembly.Location);
        Type[] types = assembly.GetTypes();

        List<Type> results = new List<Type>();
        GetAllDerivedTypesRecursively(types, typeof(SiteAndSectorsTable<>), ref results);

        foreach (var type in results)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(type.Name);
        }
    }

    private static void GetAllDerivedTypesRecursively(Type[] types, Type type1, ref List<Type> results)
    {
        if (type1.IsGenericType)
        {
            GetDerivedFromGeneric(types, type1, ref results);
        }
        else
        {
            GetDerivedFromNonGeneric(types, type1, ref results);
        }
    }

    private static void GetDerivedFromGeneric(Type[] types, Type type, ref List<Type> results)
    {
        var derivedTypes = types
            .Where(t => t.BaseType != null && t.BaseType.IsGenericType &&
                        t.BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == type).ToList();
        results.AddRange(derivedTypes);
        foreach (Type derivedType in derivedTypes)
        {
            GetAllDerivedTypesRecursively(types, derivedType, ref results);
        }
    }


    public static void GetDerivedFromNonGeneric(Type[] types, Type type, ref List<Type> results)
    {
        var derivedTypes = types.Where(t => t != type && type.IsAssignableFrom(t)).ToList();

        results.AddRange(derivedTypes);
        foreach (Type derivedType in derivedTypes)
        {
            GetAllDerivedTypesRecursively(types, derivedType, ref results);
        }
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
ta - just used your pattern locally here to ensure we're testing all particular implementations of a (generic) base class and it's worked a treat. –  cristobalito Sep 15 '14 at 15:03

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