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today while i was trying to write a code to just add & subtract the two 2*2 matrices, in which i used switch statement, i got an error case bypass initialization of local variable in function main()

#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>

int 
main()
{
    int mat1[2][2], mat2[2][2], mat3[2][2];

    cout << "Enter the elements in the first matrix";
    for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 2; j++) {
            cin >> mat1[i][j];
        }
    }

    cout << "\n\nEnter the elements of the second matrix";

    for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++) {
        for (int l = 0; l < 2; l++) {
            cin >> mat2[k][l];
        }
    }

    cout << "\n\nsaved......";

    int choice;
    cout << "\n\n\nFor adding these two matrices,press 1";
    cout << "\nFor subtracting these two matrices,press 2";
    cin >> choice;

    switch (choice) {
    case 1:

        cout << "The addition of the two matrices will yield";
        for (int a = 0; a <= 1; a++) {
            for (int b = 0; b <= 1; b++) {
                mat3[a][b] = mat1[a][b] + mat2[a][b];
            }
        }
        break;

    case 2:
        cout << "The subtraction of the two matrices will yield";
        for (int c = 0; c <= 1; c++) {
            for (int d = 0; d <= 1; d++) {
                mat3[c][d] = mat1[c][d] - mat2[c][d];
            }
        }
        break;
    }
    getch();
    return 0;
}

I also found that I can take the rid of this error by placing the code of case(s) ,into braces, NOW,

  1. my confusion is about the error...
  2. & the requirement of braces in case....

(I know I haven't used the new coding conventions, like <iostream>, std namespace etc. etc. as I have written it in turbo c++ compiler, so a to the point answer is humbly requested)

share|improve this question
    
Can you please indent the code? Thanks. –  Keith Thompson Aug 12 '11 at 18:23
    
Which line of code is generating that error? –  matzahboy Aug 12 '11 at 18:23
    
This isn't an answer, but both branches of the case statement add the two matrices, and nothing prints them back out afterward. I'm guessing that's not what you meant. –  Zack Aug 12 '11 at 18:25
    
@keith thompson: Done with it –  nobalG Aug 12 '11 at 18:29
    
Please paste the error message. –  kracekumar Aug 12 '11 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A switch statement is just a bunch of labels and a goto done by the compiler depending on the value of the thing inside the switch test.

When you have a local variable in a function, anywhere past the declaration of that variable you can use it. For instance:

int a;
// can use a now

However, in a switch statement, if you have a local variable:

case a:
    int a;
    break;
case b:
    // we can use a here because these cases are just labels used in a goto
    // i.e. the cases do *not* create a new scope

So when you have a variable in a case, the variable exists in cases below it but the variable won't exist because the code that initialized it got skipped by the case statement. It's hard for me to explain, maybe someone else can do a better job.

The braces fix this problem because they make the variable local, so that it doesn't exist in subsequent cases. It only gets created if that particular case gets entered, and if you forget a break and control falls through to the next case, the ending } ends the scope and causes the variable to be destroyed so it's not accessible from the next case, and the initialization can't be skipped.

So just remember that all the cases share scope. That might help you understand this.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see a similar situation in the code OP posted. Infact it compiles happily on gcc, ideone.com/tgpuT –  Alok Save Aug 12 '11 at 18:41
    
@Als yes I know, because the scope of the variables in the for loop is controlled, but I don't know how he could get that error message without that situation, so I assumed that code isn't the source of the error, or it isn't real. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 12 '11 at 18:43
1  
Because he is using a crappy old compiler which does not conform to the standards. –  Alok Save Aug 12 '11 at 18:45
    
@Als: To be fair, it probably conformed to the de facto standard that existed at the time. I think Stroustrup mentions this issue in "The Design and Evolution of C++". –  Keith Thompson Aug 12 '11 at 20:31

After re-indenting your code and changing a few things so it compiles on my system, g++ compiles it without warnings.

My best guess is that it has something to do with the old rules for the scope of an object declared in a for loop (it used to live until the end of the enclosing scope; in modern C++ it's limited to the loop itself), but I can't quite be sure.

To help us figure this out, please indent the code properly, and show us the exact error message, including the line number. If the error says "line 42: ...", add a comment in your source like // this is line 42.

EDIT: Yes, I think that's the problem. In modern C++, your code is ok, because the loop variables are scoped to the loops themselves. Apparently Turbo implements a very old version of the language, so your variable a, for example, is visible all the way to the bottom of the switch statement. Enclosing each for loop in curly braces should avoid the warning:

{
    for (int a = 0; a <= 1; a++) {
        for (int b = 0; b <= 1; b++) {
            mat3[a][b] = mat1[a][b] + mat2[a][b];
        }
    }
}

EDIT2: Or better yet, stop using Turbo C++ and get a modern compiler.

EDIT3: And the reason that compiler warns about this is that even though it appears that i is always initialized before use, you could in principle refer to i in the case 2: section, bypassing the initialization. (Again, this only applies under the old rules.)

A cleaner way to work around this is probably to enclose each case section in braces:

switch (choice) {
    case 1: {
        ...
        break;
    }
    case 2: {
        ...
        break;
    }
}

(or, again, get a modern compiler, unless you have a really good reason to stick with Turbo C++).

share|improve this answer
    
respected sir,actually there is no way to do so in turbo c++,..& the error message is same as is shown by me in the bold text,in the question –  nobalG Aug 12 '11 at 18:35
    
Really? It just gives you an error message without telling you what line in the source it's complaining about? Or does it dump you into an editor with the cursor on the offending line? If so, which line is it? –  Keith Thompson Aug 12 '11 at 18:37
    
it highlights the text "case 1:" only –  nobalG Aug 12 '11 at 18:39
    
My +1, This is the correct answer. Please link to this, which shows it will work with Standard compliant compiler like gcc. –  Alok Save Aug 12 '11 at 18:44
    
Ah yes, it could be the old for scoping. Wow, that's old. –  Fred Larson Aug 12 '11 at 18:51

A case block is not a new scope by itself. Any variable you declare within one is visible for the rest of the switch statement. But in the other case blocks, it's uninitialized. By adding the braces, you create a new scope so the other blocks can't see it.

For example:

switch (choice)
{
case 0:
    int a = 42;
    break;


case 1:
    std::cout << a << std::endl; // 'a' is uninitialized here
    break;
}


switch (choice)
{
case 0:
    {
        int a = 42;
        break;
    }


case 1:
    std::cout << a << std::endl; // error -- 'a' is not declared here
    break;
}

I don't see a situation like this in the code you posted, but that's what the error message means.

share|improve this answer
    
You might want to link to (this) [ideone.com/tgpuT] gcc-4.3.4 shows no error. –  Alok Save Aug 12 '11 at 18:39
    
@Als: Did you try it with -Wall? –  Fred Larson Aug 12 '11 at 18:47
    
@Als: You mean here. That's the OP's code? As I said, I don't see this situation in that code. I don't think we're seeing the code with the problem or with the braces that fix it. –  Fred Larson Aug 12 '11 at 18:49
    
Yes it is OP's code. –  Alok Save Aug 12 '11 at 18:50

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