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It may be a little unnecessary, but I am looking for a way in C# to convert a String to a List< String > and pass it to a function all in one shot.

Let's say I have a function that takes a list of Strings and spits them out to the console.

public static void PrintStrings( List<String> messages )
{
   foreach ( String message in messages )
   {
      Console.WriteLine( message );
   }
   //Do other things
}

Now assume there is a case where I want to have only one String passed into the function. This is my question: How can I call this method passing only one String without putting it into a list beforehand? I thought this would have worked:

PrintStrings( Convert.ToString( "mymessage" ).ToList() );

But it is flagged in Visual Studio as 'The best overloaded match for 'PrintStrings' has some invalid arguments. Any suggestions would be great!

share|improve this question
    
Lots of answers assuming you are open to modifying the existing PrintStrings method or creating overloaded methods. May want to provide clairification. –  deepee1 Aug 12 '11 at 18:54
    
You get the compile error because "foo".ToList() yields List<char> –  iamkrillin Aug 12 '11 at 18:56
    
Not opposed to modifying the PrintStrings method. Looking for answer that is the smallest, and would preferably just allow me to pass strings directly. –  WienerDog Aug 12 '11 at 19:00
    
Then you prob. want to take the approach suggested by dlev, that is use a params argument –  iamkrillin Aug 12 '11 at 19:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the params keyword to allow a variable number of arguments:

public static void PrintStrings(params string[] messages )
{
   foreach ( String message in messages )
   {
      Console.WriteLine( message );
   }
   //Do other things
}

Now, you can pass either an array of strings, a single string, or even multiple strings:

PrintStrings("hi");
PrintStrings("hi", "there");
PrintStrings(stringList.ToArray());

Note that this does become less efficient if you already have the List<string>. The best way to get around that, though, is to just create an overload that accepts a single string and operate on it accordingly:

public static void PrintStrings(string myString) { ... }

Finally, if you want to keep your current signature and not add an overload, you can call the method on a new List<string> like so:

PrintStrings(new List<string>() { myString });
share|improve this answer

Try PrintStrings (new List<String>(new string[]{"String"}));

Or create an overload of PrintStrings that accepts a single string.

Btw, I think it's better to accept IEnumerable<String> rather then List<String>

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You could just create an overloaded method:

public static void PrintStrings( string message )
{      
   //Do other things
}
share|improve this answer
PrintStrings( new List<String>() {"myMessage"});
share|improve this answer
PrintStrings( (new string[] { "myMessage" }).ToList() );

edit - or maybe do an overload ie:

PrintStrings( "myMessage"  );

public static void PrintStrings( string message )
{
    AcutallyDoSomething( message );
}
public static void PrintStrings( List<String> messages )
{
   foreach ( String message in messages )
   {
      AcutallyDoSomething( message );
   }
   //Do other things
}

private static void AcutallyDoSomething(string msg)
{
   foreach ( String message in messages )
   {
      Console.WriteLine( message );
   }
}
share|improve this answer
PrintStrings(new List<string>() { "mystring" })
share|improve this answer

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