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I'm using Eazfuscator.NET to obfuscate my code..

Now i want to make sure my strings are really impossible to understand by humans.

here is what it shows for me strings:

private static string \u0002 = \u0006.\u0002(107107532);
private static string \u0003 = \u0006.\u0002(107107553);

Can someone understand what this means?

Maybe it's Hexdecimal values or something?

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closed as not constructive by Mauricio Scheffer, Yuck, Hans Passant, Henk Holterman, John Saunders Aug 12 '11 at 21:50

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2  
Contact the vendor for support. Oh, wait... –  Hans Passant Aug 12 '11 at 19:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

\u000# is an encoded unicode character. \u0002\ is a static class and \u0002 after that is one of it's methods.

There's no surefire way to fully obfuscate your code. Anyone determined enough to access it will spend as much time needed to decompile it.

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Hey Minecraft Fan! xD i know it's an encoded unicode character but still you sure it's possible to figure out this string ? –  Danpe Aug 12 '11 at 19:01
    
To determine what it was originally called? No it is not. They would have to guess as to what everything does. Decompiling doesn't undo string/method renaming; and hello there! –  Brian Graham Aug 12 '11 at 19:02
    
I dont care if they know what the vairables name... i'm afried they finds out the value.. is it possible to find out the value ? –  Danpe Aug 12 '11 at 19:10
    
If you don't want a user to determine the value of the string, why are you including it at all? –  Iridium Aug 12 '11 at 19:29
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That's sort of my point - if you are able to use the actual value of the variable in your code, then it will always be possible for someone determined enough to obtain it regardless of how much you attempt to obfuscate it. –  Iridium Aug 12 '11 at 20:35

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