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Do methods which return Reference Types return references or cloned copy?

A co-worker of mine stated that when a method returns an object like the following, a new instance/copy of the object is created as opposed to passing back a reference:

public CustomerEntity Customer { get; set; }

public CustomerEntity GetCustomer() {
    Customer = new CustomerEntity();
    return Customer;    
}

Is that correct? My tests seem to indicate otherwise, but I am not certain how to confirm this. He is concerned about the overhead in copying data to the new object.

For good measure, in which of the following methods/scenarios are new objects created? In which situations does the calling class access a reference to or a copy of the to the original object? Assume the 'CustomerEntity' is a very large object.

public class CustMan {
public CustomerEntity GetCustomer() {
    Customer = new CustomerEntity();
    return Customer
}

public void FillCustomer(CustomerEntity customer)
{
    customer = new CustomerEntity();
    // Calling class: 
    // CustomerEntity ce = new CustomerEntity(); 
    // l_custMan.FillCustomer(ce);  WriteLine(ce.Name);   
}

public void LoadCustomer()
{
    Customer = new CustomerEntity();
    // Calling Class access customerEntity via l_custMan.CustomerEntity
}
}

Clarification: My co-worker believes it would be better to use a 'Load' method than a 'Get' method:

l_custMan.Load();
CustomerEntity = l_custMan.Customer;

vs.

CustomerEntity = l_custMan.GetCustomer();
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marked as duplicate by Henk Holterman, dlev, Dour High Arch, John Saunders, Bo Persson Aug 13 '11 at 7:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

8  
Your co-worker is wrong. It's just a reference being returned (albeit a copy of the reference.) He's confusing this situation with a value type, which would be completely copied. –  dlev Aug 12 '11 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A co-worker of mine stated that when a method returns an object like the following, a new instance/copy of the object is created as opposed to passing back a reference:

Your coworker is incorrect*. For return types that are reference types, a copy is always made, it's just that it is a copy of the reference that is made.

I can be a bit more explicit:

Assuming that ReturnType is a reference type and given

public ReturnType M() {
    // some code
    return E;
}

where E is an expression that evaluates to an instance I of ReturnType, you are asking if a copy C of I is made and a reference to C is returned to the caller, or if a reference to I is returned to the caller. The answer is that a reference to I is returned to the caller.

This is the same for parameters of reference type passed into methods (unless they are marked with ref or out): a copy is always made, it is just a copy of the reference that is passed.

*: In his defense, he's possibly getting confused by some knowledge of C++, where you have to be explicit that you are returning a reference.

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+1: Much better summation of the situation than my tired rambly mumblings :) –  Binary Worrier Aug 12 '11 at 19:26
    
I like to use the terminology "an object reference is returned by value" (or, for parameters, "an object reference is passed by value"). I'd prefer to call the things stored in class-type variables as "instance ids" rather than "object references", so as not to overload the term "reference" (which could also refer to the thing passed in a ref parameter), and to make clear what's going on. If a worker at an automotive body shop received a work order that said "Paint car #1G574X8 blue", the worker would know... –  supercat Aug 12 '11 at 23:29
    
...to look for a car with the specified VIN and paint the car blue. The worker would not be expected to return a slip of paper with the VIN inked over in blue ink, nor would he be expected to create a new car which was like the old one but was blue. Passing a parameter to a function would be like copying the number onto a new work order; it would duplicate the number, but not the car. –  supercat Aug 12 '11 at 23:32

While only a reference is returned your method seems odd:

public CustomerEntity GetCustomer() {
    Customer = new CustomerEntity();
    return Customer;    
}

The name suggests that it returns a field, instead it creates a new object, overwrites a property and then returns a reference, so here an object is created every time.

The method should probably be this:

public CustomerEntity GetCustomer() {
    return Customer;    
}

But that is superfluous as your property already has a getter.

(I assume CustomerEntity to be a class rather than a struct, for structs a copy is created)

share|improve this answer
    
I see how the name is confusing. My intention is to look at the best way to Fill an object and use that object in the calling class. The 'GetCustomer' method would create a new instance, fill from the Database, then return it to the calling object. –  davewilliams459 Aug 12 '11 at 19:46

You will be returning a reference to the object. To create a "new" copy, you will need to create a completely new entity.

public CustomerEntity GetCustomer() {
    CustomerEntity toReturn = new CustomerEntity();
    return toReturn ;    
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if CustomerEntity is a value type? –  Binary Worrier Aug 12 '11 at 19:26
    
Well, then I guess that should be specified in the question. If CustomerEntity was a value type (which I highly doubt based on the op's description) then a copy will be made by a simple assignment. –  tribe84 Aug 12 '11 at 19:30
    
It's still copying the reference to toReturn back to the caller. That's what the question is fundamentally asking. –  jason Aug 12 '11 at 19:33
    
I guess I am interpreting the question wrong then. I thought the OP is asking will a "new" or "reference to an existing" object be returned. The answer is: a reference to the existing object. –  tribe84 Aug 12 '11 at 19:36
1  
@tribe84: The question should be thought of as this: assuming that ReturnType is a reference type, given public ReturnType M() { // some code; return returnType; }. Is a copy of the referent of returnType made, and a reference to that returned, or is a reference to returnType returned? –  jason Aug 12 '11 at 19:38

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