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I'm writing a psychology experiment in jQuery. I want to write a function that will begin the exercise when the user presses p or q. I have that working:

$(function trial() {
$("body").keydown(function(e) {
    if (e.which == 81 || e.which == 80)
        {
        $(".message").text("exercise begun (timestamp)");
        var refreshId = setTimeout(timeout, 2000);
        }
});
});

But I'm confused about one thing: this function, trial(), runs automatically. I would like to have to call it, for it to run. For instance, this function

function timeout(x) {
var x = trialNum
$(".message").prepend("Timeout (Trial " + x + ")<br>");
}

which gets called by trial() behaves itself well, it does not run unless called. I assume this has something to do with the $ symbol, and "scope"? All help appreciated.

Oh! Additionally, one more question. I was trying to make a recursive jQuery function and had a lot of trouble with it. What's the best way to make a function call itself?

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3  
I would suggest that if you have two independent questions, you ask them separately. –  murgatroid99 Aug 12 '11 at 19:22
    
alright, will do. –  Tr3y Aug 12 '11 at 19:27
1  
I would also pay some time on the api's on jquery's website. Their documentation is as good if not better then msdn. –  JonH Aug 12 '11 at 19:28
1  
Indeed, the jQuery documentation is conspicuously good for an open source project. I won't compare it to MSDN, because I wouldn't want to insult the people doing the jQuery docs. –  T.J. Crowder Aug 12 '11 at 19:31
    
@T.J. Crowler - Ouch, MSDN is getting better, let's put it that way. –  JonH Aug 12 '11 at 19:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's because you're passing a reference to it into $() (aka jQuery()), which is a shortcut for the ready function and runs when the DOM is loaded.


Off-topic: BTW, by doing that, you're using the function as a right-hand value (like something on the right-hand side of an = sign). That makes it a function expression. Since you've named the function (which is a good thing to do), it's a named function expression. Those have historically not worked well in various JavaScript implementations. Most current browsers are (now) okay, except IE prior to IE9 which will create two completely separate functions, more here: Double take

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Cool - but if I strip off the $(), how can I use the other jQuery code like $("body").keydown and $(".message"? I don't understand how I'd structure that markup if I didn't use the $(). –  Tr3y Aug 12 '11 at 19:33
    
You can use jQuery code anywhere as long as you have the jQuery library included. You don't have to do everything jQuery-related in $(document).ready. –  FishBasketGordo Aug 12 '11 at 19:36
    
The question is do you want certain things to be inside of document.ready? That is something only you can answer based on your knowledge of the system. –  JonH Aug 12 '11 at 19:43
    
I don't fully understand. $() is shorthand for $(document).ready when I'm wrapping it around a function, but it's jquery when I'm using it in $("body").keydown? Are these the same thing or different things? –  Tr3y Aug 12 '11 at 19:45
    
Update: Tutorials all say to do ALL jQuery inside document.ready. And when I put even a very simple jQuery statement outside of document.ready, such as this one: $("ul li:nth-child(1)").append(numStim);, it fails to work. Inside document.ready, it works like a charm. Advice? –  Tr3y Aug 12 '11 at 19:53

To answer your first question, $(function(){...code...}) is the jQuery shortcut for $(document).ready(function(){...code...}); which runs as soon as the DOM has reached the ready state.

About your second question (it does belong in a separate question on SO, but i'll answer it anyway):

Functions in jQuery are no different than functions in JavaScript. Named functions can call themselves recursively using thier own name:

function foo(bar, baz)
{
  ...do some stuff...
  if (--bar)
  {
    foo(bar, baz);
  }
}

You'll have to be more specific as to what you want to achieve with the recursive function, and if you're going to do that, please open a separate question on StackOverflow.

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By surrounding function trial() { ... } with $( and );, you're calling it when the document is ready. It's shorthand for $(document).ready(function trial() { ... });[API Ref]

If you don't want to do that, remove the surrounding $( and );.

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+1 clearly explained very good answer and short and to the point. –  JonH Aug 12 '11 at 19:31

$() is a short cut for the DOM ready event. It just executes the function passed to it. To solve it, use $(document).ready itself:

$(document).ready(function(){
   function trial() {
        $("body").keydown(function(e) {
        if (e.which == 81 || e.which == 80){
             $(".message").text("exercise begun (timestamp)");
             var refreshId = setTimeout(timeout, 2000);
        }
   }
});
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Try the following:

$(function(){
trial = function(){
// Your code here
};
});
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trial() runs automatically because it is inside the $() function. $(function(){}) is the same as $(document).ready(function(){}).

$(function trial(){}); creates a function called trial in its scope, and then runs it when the DOM is ready.

Just declare the function normally:

function trial(){
  // Code
}

Or, if you want it declared when the DOM is ready, you can declare it inside $() (NOTE: trial will only exist inside the $() function):

$(function(){
    function trial(){
      // Code
    }
    trial();
});
trial(); // won't work, it's out of scope
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Tr3y, doing this: $(function trial() will make it run automatically. I don't know why so but jquery just does it like that. You are fine to just keep it as function trial(). As for repeating the function, just put the function name in the function and call the function externally like this:

    function trial() {
    $("body").keydown(function(e) {
        if (e.which == 81 || e.which == 80)
            {
            $(".message").text("exercise begun (timestamp)");
            var refreshId = setTimeout(timeout, 2000);
            }
    });
trial();
    }
trial();

However, I do not recommend this, because it will cause a infinite loop that can crash the tab.

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1  
-1 for answering a question but mentioning you dont know why. If you dont know why its not an answer its a guess. And no the answer is not jquery just does it like that. It's because it has fired $(document).ready the selector being document and the action is .ready. –  JonH Aug 12 '11 at 19:28
    
-1 for "it will cause a infinite loop that can crash the tab". –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 12 '11 at 19:34
1  
I did say I do not recommend it –  Kevin Pei Aug 12 '11 at 19:41

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