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I'm trying to add a convenience constructor to my custom object. Similar to [NSArray arrayWithArray:]

I know it involves a class method that returns an auto released object. I've been googling around but all I can seem to find is the definition of a convenience constructor but not how to write one.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Let's say you have the following:

@class PotatoPeeler : NSObject
- (instancetype)initWithWidget: (Widget *)w;
@end

Then to add a factory method, you'd change it to this:

@class PotatoPeeler : NSObject
+ (instancetype)potatoPeelerWithWidget: (Widget *)w;
- (instancetype)initWithWidget: (Widget *)w;
@end

And your implementation would simply be:

+ (instancetype)potatoPeelerWithWidget: (Widget *)w {
    return [[[self alloc] initWithWidget: w] autorelease];
}

Edit: replaced id with instancetype. They are functionally identical, but the latter provides better hints to the compiler about the method's return type.

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8  
+1 note the use self instead of the hard-coded class name to alloc-init the instance in order to handle subclassing properly (self here refers to the class object itself). Also note the return type id: "The return type of convenience constructors is id for the same reason it is id for initializer methods" –  albertamg Aug 12 '11 at 20:53
    
@albertamg: Exactly right. :) –  Jonathan Grynspan Aug 12 '11 at 22:23
1  
Hopefully google indexes it this time ;) –  Christian Schlensker Aug 14 '11 at 4:01
2  
@albertamg Can you elaborate on why [self alloc] is used over [PotatoPeeler alloc]? Not sure what you mean by handling subclassing properly...thx –  raffian Jun 23 '12 at 0:56
2  
Let's say you have a subclass, SweetPotatoPeeler. If you use +[self alloc], then the convenience method will properly return an instance of SweetPotatoPeeler instead of PotatoPeeler. If you use +[PotatoPeeler alloc], the method will always give you an instance of your base class, and subclasses will not be able to take advantage of it. –  Jonathan Grynspan Jun 23 '12 at 2:54

Generally my approach is the following: first I create a normal initializer method (instance method), then I create a class method that calls the normal initializer. It seems to me Apple uses the same approach most of the time. An example:

@implementation SomeObject

@synthesize string = _string; // assuming there's an 'string' property in the header

- (id)initWithString:(NSString *)string 
{
   self = [super init];
   if (self)
   {
      self.string = string;
   }
   return self;
}

+ (SomeObject *)someObjectWithString:(NSString *)string
{
   return [[[SomeObject alloc] initWithString:string] autorelease];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
   self.string = nil;

   [super dealloc];
}

@end
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-(MYClass*) myInit{
    self = [super init];

    /* Your code */

    return self;
}

Assuming you derive your class from NSObject.

Just give it whatever parameters you want to pass into the constructor.

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