Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to get the value of an annotation in server side code? For example, I have:

public class Dummy
{
    [Display(Name = "Foo")]
    public string foo { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Bar")]
    public string bar { get; set; }
}

I want to be able to get the value "Foo" on server side with out posting it back to the page, but like an attribute of the class, or something of the sort. Like a @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Foo) But in c# server code.

Is that possible?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
What you mean by C# server code? –  sll Aug 12 '11 at 23:00
    
@Html.LabelFor(model => model.Foo) <-- that won't output "Foo"? Maybe you need to use the DisplayNameAttribute instead. –  John Kalberer Aug 12 '11 at 23:01
    
@sllev Sorry, I mean code behind. In an Action in a Controller. –  AJC Aug 12 '11 at 23:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Something like this?

string displayName = GetDisplayName((Dummy x) => x.foo);

// ...

public static string GetDisplayName<T, U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> exp)
{
    var me = exp.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (me == null)
        throw new ArgumentException("Must be a MemberExpression.", "exp");

    var attr = me.Member
                 .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DisplayAttribute), false)
                 .Cast<DisplayAttribute>()
                 .SingleOrDefault();

    return (attr != null) ? attr.Name : me.Member.Name;
}

Or, if you want to be able to call the method against an instance and take advantage of type inference:

var dummy = new Dummy();
string displayName = dummy.GetDisplayName(x => x.foo);

// ...

public static string GetDisplayName<T, U>(this T src, Expression<Func<T, U>> exp)
{
    var me = exp.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (me == null)
        throw new ArgumentException("Must be a MemberExpression.", "exp");

    var attr = me.Member
                 .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DisplayAttribute), false)
                 .Cast<DisplayAttribute>()
                 .SingleOrDefault();

    return (attr != null) ? attr.Name : me.Member.Name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, very concise. How are you able to access attr.Name without casting it to Displayattribute? GetCustomAttributes(type, inherit) returns Object[]. –  Alex Ford Aug 12 '11 at 23:42
    
First one works great, but with the latter option GetDisplayName does not appear as an extension on the dummy instance. –  Alex Ford Aug 12 '11 at 23:50
    
@Alex: I am casting it: var attr = (DisplayAttribute)me.Member.... (Or rather I was casting it; I've just edited the answer to use the Cast<DisplayAttribute>() method instead of the explicit cast.) –  LukeH Aug 12 '11 at 23:52
    
@Alex: The extension method needs to live in a separate, static class. I should've mentioned that. –  LukeH Aug 12 '11 at 23:53
    
Disregard last comment, I did not mark class as static. D'oh! I would recommend this answer over mine; it is far more robust. –  Alex Ford Aug 12 '11 at 23:53

You will need to use reflection. Here is a sample console program that does what you want.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Dummy dummy = new Dummy();
        PropertyInfo[] properties = dummy.GetType().GetProperties();
        foreach (PropertyInfo property in properties)
        {
            IEnumerable<DisplayAttribute> displayAttributes = property.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DisplayAttribute), false).Cast<DisplayAttribute>();
            foreach (DisplayAttribute displayAttribute in displayAttributes)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Property {0} has display name {1}", property.Name, displayAttribute.Name);
            }
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Dummy
{
    [Display(Name = "Foo")]
    public string foo { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Bar")]
    public string bar { get; set; }
}

This would produce the following result:

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the answer to loop through all DisplayAttributes in case a member had more than one. –  Alex Ford Aug 12 '11 at 23:25
    
A member should never have more than one because DisplayAttribute is annotated with AllowMultiple = false. –  LukeH Aug 12 '11 at 23:37
    
@LukeH That's fine, but I don't like making assumptions with my code ;) –  Alex Ford Aug 12 '11 at 23:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.