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Given an application pool that runs on integrated mode, the apppool is able to provide service to "Managed Handler Requests" (GET an aspx page) as well as "non-Managed Handler Requests" (GET a jpg file).

When processing a MHR request the app pool should consider all modules but for nonMHRs should not consider the modules marked with the Managed Handler precondition.

Has the app pool two different HttpAplication pipelines (one for MHRs and the other for nonMHRs) ? Or he only has one pipeline and is able to decide which httpAplication event handlers are raised depending of the request?

I guess the app pool decides if the request is managed or not, before httpApplication starts the BeginRequest. At least before the AuthenticateRequest. Is that right?

Response in the link:

All resources served by IIS are mapped to a handler in configuration. If the configuration mapping does not exist, requests for the resource will receive a 404 HTTP status. In addition to the configuration mapping, which takes place before the pipeline begins, the handler mapping can be changed during request execution ...

The Init function of the modules are only executed once (maybe in the application pool startup) independently of the Managed Handler precondition?

I guess the apppool doesn't create the whole pipeline (registering httpaplication events and so) for each request.

Thanks in advance,

UPDATE1: After reading the link I still "see" two diferent pipelines given a single apppool. By diferent pipelines I mean two diferent sets of event handlers registered in the IIS pipeline:

BEGIN_REQUEST
AUTHENTICATE_REQUEST
AUTHORIZE_REQUEST
RESOLVE_REQUEST_CACHE
MAP_REQUEST_HANDLER
ACQUIRE_REQUEST_STATE
PRE_EXECUTE_REQUEST_HANDLER
EXECUTE_REQUEST_HANDLER
RELEASE_REQUEST_STATE
UPDATE_REQUEST_CACHE
LOG_REQUEST
END_REQUEST

When an application pool in integrated mode starts, it can look up the modules section and can execute the Init function of each module (indepentdently of the precondition setting). The Init function of each module registers itself in some IIS pipeline stages. But at runtime when processing non-managed requests it should skip the event handlers of modules with precondition managed handler. How can do that?

UPDATE2: From my understanding, an app pool (the windows process) host an ASP.Net runtime (httpRuntime in System.Web?). This runtime contains a pool of httpApplication objects. When app pool starts (or maybe until first request arrive) several httpApplications are instantiated. At this time the Init method of the httpModules (under modules in web.config) are called. Until IIS7 integration mode appearance I thought all httpApplication objects would be clones, but because depending of the type of handler's request (managed or non managed) some httpModules should be considered or not, I deduce that the httpRutime contains two httpApplication pools or maybe a given httpApplication object is only able to process managed handler requests or non-managed hadler requests, but never the two...

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you can read this one http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tmarq/archive/2007/08/30/iis-7-0-asp-net-pipelines-modules-handlers-and-preconditions.aspx

In there you see that the IIS has only one pipeline. The "classic" way of serving asp.net requests begins in the IIS pipeline’s EXECUTE_REQUEST_HANDLER event. Think of ASP.NET in classic mode as a pipeline within the IIS pipeline.

With the integrated mode you can basically plug in managed code in the whole IIS pipeline series of events, like adding asp.net forms authentication to static files like .jpg

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The link is very interesting. But still having doubts... See UPDATE1 –  Eduard Aug 17 '11 at 7:55
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