Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I assumed lambda functions, delegates and anonymous functions with the same body would have the same "speed", however, running the following simple program:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<int> items = new List<int>();

    Random random = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    {
        items.Add(random.Next());
    }

    Stopwatch watch;
    IEnumerable<int> result;

    Func<int, bool> @delegate = delegate(int i)
    {
        return i < 500;
    };
    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(@delegate);
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Delegate: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

    Func<int, bool> lambda = i => i < 500;
    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(lambda);
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Lambda: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(i => i < 500);
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Inline: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

I get:

Delegate: 4.2948 ms

Lambda: 0.0019 ms

Anonymous: 0.0034 ms

Although negligible, why are these three - apparently identical - methods running at different speeds? What's happening under the hood?


Update:

As suggested by the comments, the following "forces" the Where by calling ToList() on it. In addition, a loop is added to offer more run data:

while (true) 
{
    List<int> items = new List<int>();

    Random random = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    {
        items.Add(random.Next());
    }

    Stopwatch watch;
    IEnumerable<int> result;

    Func<int, bool> @delegate = delegate(int i)
    {
        return i < 500;
    };
    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(@delegate).ToList();
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Delegate: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

    Func<int, bool> lambda = i => i < 500;
    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(lambda).ToList();
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Lambda: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

    watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    result = items.Where(i => i < 500).ToList();
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Inline: {0}", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
    Console.WriteLine(new string('-', 12));

}

The above code results in ~120 ms for each function.

share|improve this question
    
just out of curiosity, did you try running the 3 in different orders? –  qntmfred Aug 13 '11 at 5:50
5  
Add warmup period and run all tests several cycles (big loop around all) and force Where. After these changes I see no perceptible difference. –  user166390 Aug 13 '11 at 6:00
1  
What's the effect of the @ in this code? (@delegate) –  Igby Largeman Aug 13 '11 at 6:11
3  
@Omar: The code you've shown certainly wouldn't take 120ms - I suggest you edit the code to show how you're "forcing" Where. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '11 at 6:43
1  
@Mikael: thanks - didn't know you could do that. –  Igby Largeman Aug 14 '11 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

A lambda expression is an anonymous function. "Anonymous function" refers to either a lambda expression or an anonymous method (which is what you've called a "delegate" in your code).

All three operations are using delegates. The second and third are both using lambda expressions. All three will execute in the same way, with the same performance characteristics.

Note that there can be a difference in performance between:

Func<int, int> func = x => ...;
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
    CallFunc(func);
}

and

for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
    CallFunc(x => ...) // Same lambda as before
}

It depends on whether the compiler is able to cache the delegate created by the lambda expression. That will in turn depend on whether it captures variables etc.

For example, consider this code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

class Test
{
    const int Iterations = 1000000000;

    static void Main()
    {
        AllocateOnce();
        AllocateInLoop();
    }

    static void AllocateOnce()
    {
        int x = 10;

        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        Func<int, int> allocateOnce = y => y + x;
        for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            sum += Apply(i, allocateOnce);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Allocated once: {0}ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void AllocateInLoop()
    {
        int x = 10;

        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            sum += Apply(i, y => y + x);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Allocated in loop: {0}ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static int Apply(int loopCounter, Func<int, int> func)
    {
        return func(loopCounter);
    }
}

The compiler is smart, but there's still a difference. Using Reflector, we can see that AllocateInLoop is effectively compiled to:

private static void AllocateInLoop()
{
    Func<int, int> func = null;
    int x = 10;
    Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
    {
        if (func == null)
        {
            func = y => y + x;
        }
        sum += Apply(i, func);
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Allocated in loop: {0}ms", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

So still only a single delegate instance is created, but there's extra logic within the loop - an extra nullity test on each iteration, basically.

On my machine that makes about a 15% difference in performance.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not sure how you go about examining the IL output, but I assume that delegate { Foo(); } and () => { Foo(); } would compile to the same IL right? –  Lea Hayes May 15 '13 at 20:55
1  
@LeaHayes: I'd expect so, yes. –  Jon Skeet May 15 '13 at 21:03

Other peoples results suggest that the performance is the same:

http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/alex_golesh/archive/2007/12/11/anonymous-delegates-vs-lambda-expressions-vs-function-calls-performance.aspx

As noted in the comments, micro-benchmarks are often misleading. There are too many factors over which you have no control, JIT optimisation, garbage collection cycles, etc ...

See this related question:

when not to use lambda expressions

Finally, I think your test is fundamentally flawed! You use a Linq Where extension method to execute your code. However, Linq uses lazy-evaluation, your code will only be executed if you start iterating over the results!

share|improve this answer
3  
Can you make the last paragraph bold? :) –  leppie Aug 13 '11 at 6:44
1  
@leppie - sure thing! –  ColinE Aug 13 '11 at 6:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.