Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Since they fill up and the percentage of false positives increase, what are some of the techniques used to keep them from saturating? It seems like you cannot empty out bits, since that would make an immediate negative on data stored in that node.

Even if you have a set of known size, in a data store using bloom filters like Cassandra what confuses me is that the data in a node is going to be added and removed, right? But when you remove a key you cannot set its bloom filter buckets to 0 since that might create a false negative for data in the node that hash to one or more same buckets as the removed key. So over time, it is as if the filter fills up

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you need to set an upper bound on the size of the set that the bloom filter covers. If the set exceeds that size, you need to recalculate the bloom filter.

As used in cassandra, the size of the set covered by the bloom filter is known before creating the filter, so this is not an issue.

Another aproach is Scalable Bloom Filters

share|improve this answer
    
what confuses me though, is that the data in a node is going to be added and removed, right? But when you remove a key you cannot set its bloom filter buckets to 0 since that might create a false negative for data in the node that hash to one or more same buckets as the removed key. So over time, it is as if the filter fills up right? –  ambertch Aug 15 '11 at 7:30
    
bloom filters are per sstable,once an sstable is created it never changes. other sstables are added as new data comes in, and deletions are handled via tombstones, which are writes stored in an sstable –  sbridges Aug 15 '11 at 14:28

The first thing you should realize is that bloom filters are only additive. There are some approaches to approximate deletion:

  • Rewriting the bloom filter
    • You have to keep the old data
    • You pay a performance price
  • A negative bloom filter
    • Much cheaper than the above, also helps deal with false positives if you can detect them.
  • Counting bloom filters (decrement the count)
  • Buckets
    • Keep multiple categorized bloom filters, discarding a category when it is no longer needed (e.g. 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday',...)
  • Others?

If you have time-limited data, it may be efficient to use buckets, and discard filters that are too old.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.