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Is it possible to pass interface's method as parameters?

I'm trying something like this:

interface

type
  TMoveProc = procedure of object;
  // also tested with TMoveProc = procedure;
  // procedure of interface is not working ;)

  ISomeInterface = interface
    procedure Pred;
    procedure Next;
  end;

  TSomeObject = class(TObject)
  public
    procedure Move(MoveProc: TMoveProc);
  end;

implementation

procedure TSomeObject.Move(MoveProc: TMoveProc);
begin
  while True do
  begin
    // Some common code that works for both procedures
    MoveProc;
    // More code...
  end;
end;

procedure Usage;
var
  o: TSomeObject;
  i: ISomeInterface;
begin
  o := TSomeObject.Create;
  i := GetSomeInterface;
  o.Move(i.Next);
  // somewhere else: o.Move(i.Prev);
  // tested with o.Move(@i.Next), @@... with no luck
  o.Free;
end;

But it is not working because:

E2010 Incompatible types: 'TMoveProc' and 'procedure, untyped pointer or untyped parameter'

Of course I can do private method for each call, but that is ugly. Is there any better way?

Delphi 2006


Edit: I know that I can pass whole interface, but then I have to specify which function use. I don't want two exactly same procedures with one different call.

I can use second parameter, but that is ugly too.

type
  SomeInterfaceMethod = (siPred, siNext)

procedure Move(SomeInt: ISomeInterface; Direction: SomeInterfaceMethod)
begin
  case Direction of:
    siPred: SomeInt.Pred;
    siNext: SomeInt.Next
  end;
end;

Thanks all for help and ideas. Clean solution (for my Delphi 2006) is Diego's Visitor. Now I'm using simple ("ugly") wrapper (my own, same solution by TOndrej and Aikislave).

But true answer is "there is no (direct) way to pass interface's methods as parameters without some kind of provider.

share|improve this question
    
The code in TSomeObject.Move looks like a use case for a 'Strategy' pattern. The MoveProc could be a method of a TAbstractMoveProcStrategy class, where subclasses implement the required behaviour in the Move method. TMovePredStrategy / TMoveNextStrategy would have different Move procs. –  mjn Apr 1 '09 at 13:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is another solution that is working in Delphi 20006. It is similar to the idea of @Rafael, but using interfaces:

interface 

type
  ISomeInterface = interface
    //...
  end;

  IMoveProc = interface
    procedure Move;
  end;

  IMoveProcPred = interface(IMoveProc)
  ['{4A9A14DD-ED01-4903-B625-67C36692E158}']
  end;

  IMoveProcNext = interface(IMoveProc)
  ['{D9FDDFF9-E74E-4F33-9CB7-401C51E7FF1F}']
  end;


  TSomeObject = class(TObject)
  public
    procedure Move(MoveProc: IMoveProc);
  end;

  TImplementation = class(TInterfacedObject, 
      ISomeInterface, IMoveProcNext, IMoveProcPred)
    procedure IMoveProcNext.Move = Next;
    procedure IMoveProcPred.Move = Pred;
    procedure Pred;
    procedure Next;
  end;

implementation

procedure TSomeObject.Move(MoveProc: IMoveProc);
begin
  while True do
  begin
    // Some common code that works for both procedures
    MoveProc.Move;
    // More code...
  end;
end;

procedure Usage;
var
  o: TSomeObject;
  i: ISomeInterface;
begin
  o := TSomeObject.Create;
  i := TImplementation.Create;
  o.Move(i as IMoveProcPred);
  // somewhere else: o.Move(i as IMoveProcNext);
  o.Free;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
This is very promising –  DiGi Jun 26 '14 at 8:17

If you were using Delphi 2009, you could do this with an anonymous method:

TSomeObject = class(TObject)
public
  procedure Move(MoveProc: TProc);
end;

procedure Usage;
var
  o: TSomeObject;
  i: ISomeInterface;
begin
  o := TSomeObject.Create;
  i := GetSomeInterface;
  o.Move(procedure() begin i.Next end);

The problem with trying to pass a reference to just the interface method is that you are not passing a reference to the interface itself, so the interface cannot be reference counted. But anonymous methods are themselves reference counted, so the interface reference inside the anonymous method here can be reference counted as well. That is why this method works.

share|improve this answer
1  
OK; you're going to have to live with "ugly," then (or upgrade!), because a "non-ugly" method which breaks reference counting would be worse. –  Craig Stuntz Apr 1 '09 at 13:15

I don't know the exact reason why you need to do that, but, personally, I think it would be better to pass the whole "Mover" object instead of one of its methods. I used this approach in the past, it's called "Visitor" pattern. tiOPF, an object persistence framework, uses it extensively and gives you a good example of how it works: The Visitor Pattern and the tiOPF.

It's relatively long, but it proved very useful to me, even when I didn't use tiOPF. Note step 3 in the document, titled "Step #3. Instead of passing a method pointer, we will pass an object".

DiGi, to answer your comment: If you use Visitor pattern, then you don't have an interface implementing multiple methods, but just one (Execute). Then you'd have a class for each action, like TPred, TNext, TSomething, and you pass an instance of such classes to the object to be processed. In such way, you don't have to know what to call, you just call "Visitor.Execute", and it will do the job.

Here you can find a basic example:

interface

type
TVisited = class;

TVisitor = class
  procedure Execute(Visited: TVisited); virtual; abstract;
end;

TNext = class(TVisitor)
  procedure Execute (Visited: TVisited); override;
end;

TPred = class(TVisitor)
  procedure Execute (Visited: TVisited); override;
end;

TVisited = class(TPersistent)
public
  procedure Iterate(pVisitor: TVisitor); virtual;
end;

implementation

procedure TVisited.Iterate(pVisitor: TVisitor);
begin
  pVisitor.Execute(self);
end;

procedure TNext.Execute(Visited: TVisited);
begin
  // Implement action "NEXT"
end; 

procedure TPred.Execute(Visited: TVisited);
begin
  // Implement action "PRED"
end;

procedure Usage;
var
  Visited: TVisited;
  Visitor: TVisitor;
begin
  Visited := TVisited.Create;
  Visitor := TNext.Create;

  Visited.Iterate(Visitor);
  Visited.Free;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Because Move function doesn't know which method should call. –  DiGi Apr 1 '09 at 11:21
    
Most clean solution –  DiGi Apr 3 '09 at 8:08

How about this:

type
  TMoveProc = procedure(const SomeIntf: ISomeInterface);

  TSomeObject = class
  public
    procedure Move(const SomeIntf: ISomeInterface; MoveProc: TMoveProc);
  end;

procedure TSomeObject.Move(const SomeIntf: ISomeInterface; MoveProc: TMoveProc);
begin
  MoveProc(SomeIntf);
end;

procedure MoveProcNext(const SomeIntf: ISomeInterface);
begin
  SomeIntf.Next;
end;

procedure MoveProcPred(const SomeIntf: ISomeInterface);
begin
  SomeIntf.Pred;
end;

procedure Usage;
var
  SomeObj: TSomeObject;
  SomeIntf: ISomeInterface;
begin
  SomeIntf := GetSomeInterface;
  SomeObj := TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    SomeObj.Move(SomeIntf, MoveProcNext);
    SomeObj.Move(SomeIntf, MoveProcPred);
  finally
    SomeObj.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
That is my "Of course I can do private method for each call, but that is ugly"... –  DiGi Apr 1 '09 at 11:39

Although the wrapper class solution works, I think that's an overkill. It's too much code, and you have to manually manage the lifetime of the new object.

Perhaps a simpler solution would be to create methods in the interface that returns TMoveProc

ISomeInterface = interface
  ...
  function GetPredMeth: TMoveProc;
  function GetNextMeth: TMoveProc;
  ...
end;

The class that implements the interface can provide the procedure of object and it will be accessible through the interface.

TImplementation = class(TInterfaceObject, ISomeInterface)
  procedure Pred;
  procedure Next;

  function GetPredMeth: TMoveProc;
  function GetNextMeth: TMoveProc;
end;

...

function TImplementation.GetPredMeth: TMoveProc;
begin
  Result := Self.Pred;
end;

function TImplementation.GetNextMeth: TMoveProc;
begin
  Result := Self.Next;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This works. But one has to take care, that the reference to the implementing object is still existing at the time, the function is called. For a solution that works similar but takes care of references see my answer –  yonojoy Jun 24 '14 at 17:36

You can't. Because of the scoping of Interfaces it would be possible (perhaps?) for the Interface to be released before you called the .Next function. If you want to do this you should pass the whole interface to your method rather than just a method.

Edited... Sorry, this next bit, specifically the "Of Interface" bit was meant in jest.

Also, and I could be wrong here, i.Next is not a method Of Object, as per your type def, it would be a method Of Interface!

Redefine your function

  TSomeObject = class(TObject)
  public
        procedure Move(Const AMoveIntf: ISomeInterface);
  end;

  Procedure TSomeObject.Move(Const AMoveIntf : ISomeInterface);
  Begin
       ....;
       AMoveIntf.Next;
  end;

  O.Move(I);

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
No, it is not working - interface hides object :( –  DiGi Apr 1 '09 at 11:12
    
Procedure Move(Const AInterface : ISomeInterface); Begin .... AInterface.Next; End; –  Aikislave Apr 1 '09 at 11:21

You currently have TMoveProc defined as

TMoveProc = procedure of object;

Try taking out the "of object" which implies a hidden "this" pointer as first parameter.

TMoveProc = procedure;

That should allow a normal procedure to be called.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not working too.. I will update my question –  DiGi Apr 1 '09 at 11:18

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