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I am trying to timeout the recieve() call on the socket descriptor, by using setsockopt() API with so_rcvtimeo option set with time set to 5 seconds. but my recieve() call is not timing out after 5 seconds when data is not recieved from server.

may i know if there is any settings to be enabled in windows mobile 5 to get this working or is there any other way to achieve this in windows mobile 5 / pocket pc

Thanks and regards

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?If the socket is created using the WSASocket function, then the dwFlags parameter must have the WSA_FLAG_OVERLAPPED attribute set for the timeout to function properly. Otherwise the timeout never takes effect. –  EricLaw Aug 13 '11 at 13:39
    
    
Eric,socket is created using normal socket() function –  Sal Aug 13 '11 at 13:45
    
the discussion forums specified by you indicates that rcvtimeout is not implemented in windows mobile 5 –  Sal Aug 13 '11 at 13:52
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1 Answer 1

The MSDN documentation for setsocketopt clearly states (in the Remarks section):

The following list shows BSD options that are not supported for setsockopt.

SO_ACCEPTCONN
SO_RCVLOWAT
SO_RCVTIMEO <--- Note this one
SO_SNDLOWAT
SO_SNDTIMEO
SO_TYPE

The "workaround" is to do the receive on a separate thread and wait on that thread in the caller, with a timeout that aborts the spawned thread.

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Thanks for the clarification. –  Sal Aug 13 '11 at 18:02
    
But is there any way to achieve this recieve time out without multi threaded programming ?? i got sequential processing of the calls –  Sal Aug 13 '11 at 18:04
    
Not without multi-threading, no. You can still fake synchronous behavior by having the thread signal an event that the caller waits on. –  ctacke Aug 13 '11 at 18:59
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