Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I wonder if I understood emplace_back correctly

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

struct Hero {
    Hero(const string&) {}
    Hero(const char*) {}
    Hero(int) {}
    // forbid a clone:
    Hero(const Hero&) = delete;
    Hero& operator=(const Hero&) = delete;
};

int main() {
    vector<Hero> heros1 = { "Bond", "Hulk", "Tarzan" }; // ERR: copies?

    vector<Hero> heros;
    heros.emplace_back( 5 );              // ERR: copies
    heros.emplace_back( string("Bond") ); // ERR: copies
    heros.emplace_back( "Hulk" );         // ERR: copies
}

Thus, I am really wondering If I understood emplace_back incorrectly: I though it would prevent to make a copy of Hero, because it creates the Item in-place.

Or is it a implementation error in my g++-4.7.0?

share|improve this question
2  
It's no longer C++0x. It's just C++ now! :) – Armen Tsirunyan Aug 13 '11 at 13:24
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to define a move constructor and move-assignment operator, like this:

struct Hero {
    Hero(const string&) {}
    Hero(const char*) {}
    Hero(int) {}

    Hero(Hero&&) {}
    Hero& operator=(Hero&&) { return *this; }

    // forbid a clone:
    Hero(const Hero&) = delete;
    Hero& operator=(const Hero&) = delete;
};

This allows values of type Hero to be moved into the function. Move is usually faster than copy. If the type is neither copyable nor movable then you cannot use it in a std::vector.

share|improve this answer
1  
It should also be noted that these will be generated for you if they were missing, which is why the code compiled and ran – Mooing Duck Aug 15 '11 at 16:23
    
this is preposterous. If you need a move constructor then the emplace is not really forwarding the inplace constructor any variadic arguments, you are still making a moved copy. That would make emplace_back utterly useless – lurscher Jan 17 '12 at 16:26
2  
@lurscher To be used in a std::vector at all, objects must be copyable or movable. – David Stone Jun 5 '12 at 1:58

It's no implementation error- you did not provide a move constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
You were quick! I was just typing my own answer ;-) – towi Aug 13 '11 at 13:22

Uh... I got it.

If I forbit to copy the Heros, I must allow them to move, if I want to put them in containers. How silly of me.

struct Hero {
    Hero(const string&) {}
    Hero(const char*) {}
    Hero(int) {}
    // no clone:
    Hero(const Hero&) = delete;
    Hero& operator=(const Hero&) = delete;
    // move only:
    Hero(Hero&&) {}
    Hero& operator=(Hero&&) {}
};

And all examples except for the initializer list work.

share|improve this answer
7  
Do note that emplace_back itself does not require the type to be movable - it does construct the item in-place as you thought. However, std::vector in general requires its element type to be either movable or copyable, otherwise it couldn't grow as needed. – JohannesD Aug 13 '11 at 14:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.