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In order to create a DSL for my new Scala project I've written the following code:

trait DocDB[O] {
    def searchFor[I] (docs: Iterable[I], queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, DocDB[_]]): Iterable[(I,O)]
}
trait QueryStrategy[I, +F <: DocDB[_]]

class In  // class of input documents
class Out // class of output documents
// MyDocDB
object MyDocDB extends DocDB[Out] {
    def searchFor[I] (docs: Iterable[I], queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, DocDB[_]]) = List()
}
// MyQueryStrategy for In and MyDocDB
implicit object MyQueryStrategy extends QueryStrategy[In, MyDocDB.type]

implicit def listExt[I] (items: Iterable[I]) = new {
    def findAt[O, F <: DocDB[O]](docDB: F) = new {
        def apply(implicit queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, F]): Iterable[(I,O)] = {
            docDB.searchFor[I](items, queryStrategy)
        }
    }
}

What I actually want is to be able to write

val out1: Iterable[(In, Out)] = List[In]() findAt MyDocDB

to find corresponding documents for my input documents at MyDocDB by using the query strategy MyQueryStrategy (defined as default for this input type and DocDB via implicit).

Unfortunately, the Scala compile has a problem with that line. It claims that it can not infer the types:

error: inferred type arguments [Nothing,test.StackOverflow.MyDocDB.type] do not conform to method findAt's type parameter bounds [O,F <: test.StackOverflow.DocDB[O]]
val out1: Iterable[(In, Out)] = List[In]() findAt MyDocDB

Somehow it infers Nothing instead of Out. How can I solve this without telling the compiler explicitly that it should assume O to be of type Out? I mean, the following works but does not lead to a concise DSL:

val out2: Iterable[(In, Out)] = List[In]().findAt[Out, MyDocDB.type](MyDocDB).apply(MyQueryStrategy)

Any suggestions?

Edit:

Thanks very much for your answers. I finally took paradigmatic's solution, since it allows that query strategies can be targeted to specific DocDBs which I actually need in my project. In addition to paradigmatic's solution I replaced the listExt function by

implicit def listExt[I] (items: Iterable[I]) = new {
    def findAt[F <: DocDB](docDB: F)(implicit queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, F]): Iterable[(I,F#O)] = {
        docDB.searchFor[I](items, queryStrategy)
    }
}

so that I can omit the apply method and implicit QueryStrategy:

val out1: Iterable [(In,Out)] = List[In]() findAt MyDocDB

Thanks again.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have some success by turning O in an abstract type in DocDB and using type projection:

trait DocDB {
  type O
  def searchFor[I](
    docs: Iterable[I],
    queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, DocDB]
  ): Iterable[(I,O)]
}

trait QueryStrategy[I, +F <: DocDB]

class In  // class of input documents
class Out // class of output documents

object MyDocDB extends DocDB {

  type O = Out
  def searchFor[I](
    docs: Iterable[I], 
    queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, DocDB]
  ) = List()
}

implicit object MyQueryStrategy extends QueryStrategy[In, MyDocDB.type]

implicit def listExt[I] (items: Iterable[I]) = new {
  def findAt[F <: DocDB](docDB: F) = new {
    def apply(implicit queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, F]): 
    Iterable[(I,F#O)] = {
      docDB.searchFor[I](items, queryStrategy)
    }
  }
}

It seems to work:

scala> val out1: Iterable [(In,Out)] = List[In]() findAt MyDocDB apply
out1: Iterable[(In, Out)] = List()
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Thank you very much. Works like a charm. :) –  Stefan Endrullis Aug 13 '11 at 18:54

I like paradigmatic's approach best, but it's worth mentioning that another trick to aid type inference is use of higher kinded type parameters. For example, F in QueryStrategy gets its own type parameter and becomes F[o]. Here's what I could get to compile:

trait DocDB[O] {
    def searchFor[I] (docs: Iterable[I], queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, O, DocDB]): Iterable[(I,O)]
}
trait QueryStrategy[I, O, +F[o] <: DocDB[o]]

class In
class Out

object MyDocDB extends DocDB[Out] {
  def searchFor[I] (docs: Iterable[I], queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, Out, DocDB]) = List()
}

object Foo {
  implicit object MyQueryStrategy extends QueryStrategy[In, Out, DocDB] // !! won't work QueryStrategy[In, Out, MyDocDB.type] !!

  trait Finder[I] {
    def findAt[O, F[o] <: DocDB[o]](docDB: F[O])(implicit queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, O, F]): Iterable[(I, O)]
  }

  implicit def listExt[I] (items: Iterable[I]) = new Finder[I] {
    def findAt[O, F[o] <: DocDB[o]](docDB: F[O])(implicit queryStrategy: QueryStrategy[I, O, F]): Iterable[(I, O)] = {
      docDB.searchFor[I](items, queryStrategy)
    }
  }

  val out1: Iterable[(In, Out)] = List[In]() findAt(MyDocDB)
}

A limitation is that, in the object MyQueryStrategy, one can't instantiate QueryStrategy with the specific type parameter MyDocDB.type, since it has the wrong kind. I was also getting some problems associated with your use of structural types to define findAt and within it apply. In my experience, structural types tend to have a variety of difficulties, so I introduced an explicit Finder trait to make it compile.

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