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is it possible to do say

int filename = 0;  
typedef struct{  
    char name;  
    char sname;  
    int number;  
}foo;

foo filename;  
filename++;  
foo filename;

and have a new foo struct named 1 and another named 2?

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2  
What are you really trying to do? –  Karl Knechtel - away from home Aug 13 '11 at 15:28
    
I have a struct defined and want to create a method to create new instances with this struct type within that method, these objects then get added to another struct which has a foo struct array inside it. –  HPM Aug 13 '11 at 15:33
    
First, you declare filename as int and you try to redeclare it as foo, which is impossible this way. After this, you have one char name and one char sname, so you will hold 'a', 'z', but never 'az', etc. Using void * and buffer might work. (Voidism followers :D). –  Rolice Aug 13 '11 at 15:35
    
So, you just return an instance from the method (maybe just a plain function, actually? Or you could just use a constructor, even...), and then put the instances into the array. What's the problem? You don't need a magically-renamed variable, even if you have a variable inside your function to hold a foo instance. Every time you call the function, you get another instance. Please make sure you make a clear distinction between values (data, instances of classes) and variables (names given to chunks of memory that store the values). –  Karl Knechtel - away from home Aug 13 '11 at 15:36
    
Pls accept the best post as an answer or atleast upvote the good ones –  Rohit Mar 8 '12 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C isn't interpreted language, so you can't create variable names runtime. The other way is to create array having multiple instances.

typedef struct{  
char name;  
char sname;  
int number;  
}foo;
foo *files = malloc(sizeof(foo)*3);
files[0].name = "A";
files[1].name = "B";
files[2].name = "C";

Edit: used malloc instad new foo[3]

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in that case, can I use malloc or realloc to resize that 'files' array to a larger one? –  HPM Aug 13 '11 at 15:30
    
yes, you can. I don't know if new foo[3] is possible in C, i'm c++ developer. –  Miro Aug 13 '11 at 15:31
    
ahh okay, yeah my life would be easier if I were able to use C++ libraries but it's an academic endeavor, hence the restriction to C, but all with good reason. –  HPM Aug 13 '11 at 15:35
    
There is no new in C. –  Karl Knechtel - away from home Aug 13 '11 at 15:37
    
But you've tried to do something, that you can't do in any compiled language incept C++. C++ would give you classes and easier allocating of memory,.. But base syntax is almost unchanged –  Miro Aug 13 '11 at 15:38

No, this is not possible. Declaring foo filename; will attempt to declare another variable named filename of type foo, so the integer value will never come into play there.

In addition, the introduction of two more variables named filename within the same scope wouldn't be allowed.

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You probably want a linked list, rather than an array, if you will be changing its size often. Then, your code looks something like:

typedef struct node{  
    char name;
    char sname;
    int number;
    struct node* next;
}foo;

And you would use functions like the following to add new nodes/fetch nodes:

foo head = NULL;

void addNode(foo newNode)
{
    if(head == NULL)
        head = newNode;
    else
    {
        foo temp = head;
        while(foo->next != NULL)
            foo = foo->next;
        foo->next = newNode
    }
}

foo fetchNode(int index)
{
    if(index < 0)
        return NULL;
    int n = 0
    foo temp = head;
    while(n < index && temp != NULL)
    {
        temp = temp->next;
        n++;
    }
    return temp;
}

The way this works is that each node has the necessary data, plus a pointer to the next node, which is NULL if its the last node. Then, all you need is a pointer to the first one and you can fetch nodes by walking the next pointers. This also makes it trivial to delete a node that is partway down the list.

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