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I want to do this:

var todo = "text";

$this.eval(todo).split(/\b[\s,\.-:;]*/).length;

So that this would be the resulting function:

$this.text().split(/\b[\s,\.-:;]*/).length;

I can't figure it out...How do I do this?

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possible duplicate of How do I call a dynamically-named method in Javascript? and others –  Felix Kling Aug 13 '11 at 15:49
    
Why do you need to call it dynamically like this? –  Jakub Arnold Aug 13 '11 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var todo = 'text';
$this[todo]().split(/\b[\s,\.-:;]*/).length;
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ah perfect and simple, thanks! –  delphi Aug 15 '11 at 4:53

If you must have it fully dynamic, then you can simply put it all in a string and just eval() it. Something like this:

var obj_name = "text";
var eval_code = "$this."+ obj_name + "(todo).split(/\\b[\\s,\\.-:;]*/).length;";
var result = eval(eval_code);

Also, don't name your variable eval to avoid conflicts with the eval function.

Hope that helps!

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eval is not necessary here. –  Felix Kling Aug 13 '11 at 15:53
    
I completely agree. However, the original poster was asking about using a variable as part of a line of code. That's why I said "if you must have it fully dynamic". It's not the right or even good solution, but it answers his question of embedding a variable into a block of code. But yes, it should be clarified that this is not even close to an efficient solution. –  Michael Petrov Aug 13 '11 at 15:56

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