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Basically, I am changing any and all hexadecimal values with a blue hue to its red hue counterpart in a given stylesheet (i.e. #00f is changed to #ff0000 (my function outputs six character hexadecimal values excluding the #)).

It was not a problem creating a regular expression to match hexadecimal colors (I'm not concerned about HTML color names although I may eventually care about rgb, rgba, hsb, etc. values.). This is what I ended up with #(([0-9A-z]{3}){1,2}). It works but I want it to be full proof. For example, if somebody happens to set a background image with a fragment (i.e. #top) with a valid hexadecimal value, I don't want to change it. I tried doing a negative lookbehind, but it doesn't seem to work. I was using \B#(([0-9A-z]{3}){1,2}) but if there is a word boundary (such as a space) before the '#', it match the URL fragment. This is what I thought should do the trick but doesn't: (?<!url\([^#)]*)#(([0-9A-z]{3}){1,2}).

I am using the desktop version of RegExr to test with the following stylesheet:

body {
    background: #f09 url('images#06F');
}
span {
    background=#00f url('images#889');
}
div {
    background:#E4aaa0 url('images#889');
}
h1 {
    background: #fff #dddddd;
}

Whenever, I hover over the (?<! substring, RegExr identifies it as a "Negative lookahead matching 'url\([^#)]*'." Could there be a bug or am I just having a bad regex day? And while we're at it, are there any other contextes in which a '#' is used for non-hexadecimal purposes?

EDIT: Alright, I can't program early in the morning. That hexadecimal regex should be #(([0-9A-Fa-f]{3}){1,2})

EDIT 2: Alright, so I missed the detail that most languages require static length lookbehinds.

share|improve this question
    
Despite my efforts, I can't understand your question. Do you want to match #f09 #00f #E4aaaao #fff #dddddd but not url('images#06F' url('images#889') url('images#889') ? Is this your aim ? - By the way, it seems to me that it should be #(([0-9A-Fa-f]{3}){1,2}) –  eyquem Aug 13 '11 at 16:44
    
I begin to understand. Dou you want to match #dddddd ? If not, and you want to catch only the first color after background, the solution is easy. –  eyquem Aug 13 '11 at 17:03
    
Regular expressions are not parsers. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 13 '11 at 18:04
    
@eyquem, Wow, I feel embarrassed about the [A-z]. Lol. Anyway, I want to replace every hexadecimal value so yes, your first guess was correct. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 13 '11 at 20:05
    
@Ignacio, thanks for the constructive comment. :) –  Tyler Crompton Aug 13 '11 at 20:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think that what you need is either one of the following solutions or the other

ss = '''    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    background:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd; '''

print ss
import re

three = '(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{3})'

regx = re.compile('^ *background[ =:]*#(%s{1,2})' % three,re.MULTILINE)
print regx.findall(ss)

print '-----------------------------------------------------'

regx = re.compile('(?:(?:^ *background[ =:]*)|(?:(?<=#%s)|(?<=#%s%s)) +)'
                  '#(%s{1,2})' % (three,three,three,three),
                  re.MULTILINE)
print regx.findall(ss)

result

    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    background:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd; 
['f09', '00f', 'E4aaa0', 'fff']
-----------------------------------------------------
['f09', '00f', 'E4aaa0', 'fff', 'dddddd']

Edit 1

ss = '''    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    color:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd#125e88    #ae3;
    Walter (Elias) Disney: #f51f51 '''

print ss+'\n'

import re

three = '(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{3})'

regx = re.compile('^ *[^=:]+[ =:]*#(%s{1,2})' % three,re.MULTILINE)
print regx.findall(ss)

print '-----------------------------------------------------'

regx = re.compile('(?:(?:^ *[^=:]+[ =:]*)|(?:(?<=#%s)|(?<=#%s%s)) *)'
                  '#(%s{1,2})' % (three,three,three,three),
                  re.MULTILINE)
print regx.findall(ss)

result

    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    color:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd#125e88    #ae3;
    Walter (Elias) Disney: #f51f51 

['f09', '00f', 'E4aaa0', 'fff', 'f51f51']
-----------------------------------------------------
['f09', '00f', 'E4aaa0', 'fff', 'dddddd', '125e88', 'ae3', 'f51f51']

Edit 2

ss = '''    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    color:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd#125e88    #ae3;
    Walter (Elias) Disney: #f51f51
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, from(#000000), to(#ffffff));. '''

print ss+'\n'

import re

three = '(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{3})'

preceding = ('(?:(?:^[^#]*)'
                 '|'
                 '(?:(?<=#%s)'
                     '|'
                     '(?<=#%s%s)'
                     '|'
                     '(?<= to\()'
                     ')'
                 ')') % (three,three,three)

regx = re.compile('%s *#(%s{1,2})' % (preceding,three), re.MULTILINE)
print regx.findall(ss)

result

    background: #f09 url('images#06F'); 
    background=#00f url('images #889'); 
    color:#E4aaa0 url('images#890'); 
    background: #fff #dddddd#125e88    #ae3;
    Walter (Elias) Disney: #f51f51
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, from(#000000), to(#ffffff));. 

['f09', '00f', 'E4aaa0', 'fff', 'dddddd', '125e88', 'ae3', 'f51f51', '000000', 'ffffff']

Regexes are extremely powerful in the condition that there must be enough portions of strings following a certain organisation having relative stability among variable other portions that are intended to be catched. If the analyzed text becomes too loose in its structure, it becomes impossible to write a regex.

Are there still a lot of other "Harlequin-like patchwork" structures possible for your strings ??

share|improve this answer
    
Looks promising. I'll try it out and let you know how it goes. Thank you. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 13 '11 at 20:08
    
I haven't read into it too much but it looks like you've got 'background' hard-coded in there. What if color: precedes the hexadecimal value. Or what if the color is in the middle of a background gradient? Regex is still a fresh topic for me so I'm not entirely sure as to which regex does what in the example. I do appreciate the time you put into the answer. :) –  Tyler Crompton Aug 13 '11 at 23:16
    
@Tyler Crompton What do you call "a color in the middle of a background gradient" ? –  eyquem Aug 14 '11 at 15:34
    
eyquem, For example, background: -webkit-gradient(linear, from(#000000), to(#ffffff));. I'm not 100% sure that's a syntactically valid example but you get the idea. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 14 '11 at 19:51
    
@Tyler Crompton Please, inform me if my last update brings you a good solution or not. –  eyquem Aug 19 '11 at 21:47

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