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What is the reason of casting to IDisposable before calling Dispose() ?

public interface ITransaction : IDisposable
{}
.
.
.

//in some other class:
public void EndTransaction(ITransaction transaction)
{
     if (transaction != null)
     {
          (transaction as IDisposable).Dispose(); 
          // is the following code wrong? transaction.Dispose()

          transaction = null;
     }
}

This is one of the concrete implementation of ITransaction:

public class NHibernateTransaction : ITransaction
{

     public NHibernateTransaction(NHibernate.ITransaction transaction)
     {
          this.Transaction = transaction;
     }

     protected NHibernate.ITransaction Transaction { get; private set; }

     public void Dispose()
     {
         if ( this.Transaction != null )
         {
             (this.Transaction as IDisposable).Dispose(); // this is NHibernate  ITransaction object
              this.Transaction = null;
         }
      }

}

I have seen that code snippet many times in an open source implementation of the repository pattern and I cannot seem to understand the reason behind the cast. Directly calling transaction.Dispose() inside the if clause should work just fine. Did I miss something?

The original code can be found here: NHibernateTransaction.cs

share|improve this question
6  
It's just wrong. Assigning null is wrong too. It isn't otherwise going to malfunction. Whomever wrote that doesn't really understand .NET very well. – Hans Passant Aug 13 '11 at 16:50
    
This is your answer stackoverflow.com/questions/4695649/… – Andrew T Finnell Aug 13 '11 at 16:51
1  
@Hans: They are both unnecessary. You could call that a wrong style but they're not actually harmful. Agreed on the "doesn't really understand .NET" though. – Henk Holterman Aug 13 '11 at 17:00
    
@Henk - well, it is harmful to unsuspecting newbie programmers. Which is wrong-ish. Kudos to yanong to call it. – Hans Passant Aug 13 '11 at 17:07
    
@andrew, the link you've given talks about the 'using' clause. As we know, the 'using' clause casts the object first then check if it is null. If it is null, the Dispose method is not called. The code snippet in question casts the transaction using the 'as' keyword and then immediately calls Dispose. I believe this is a different case. – yanong_banikanhon Aug 13 '11 at 17:10

Since ITransaction inherits from IDisposable, it is possible that the implementer has implemented IDisposable as an explicit interface implementation, in which case the cast is required in order to access the implemented members.

In such a case, casting ensures that the call will call the IDisposable.Dispose method. The cast is done to cover all bases.

If ITransaction doesn't inherit from IDisposable, but the implementer does, a cast is needed for Dispose to be callable. Such a case may fail (throwing an exception) if the implementer does not implement IDisposable.

share|improve this answer
1  
But ITransaction : IDisposable is the starting point. – Henk Holterman Aug 13 '11 at 16:49
1  
@Henk - I was trying to cover all bases... – Oded Aug 13 '11 at 16:49
1  
@Oded Except that if transaction DOES NOT inherit from IDisposable it will throw a Null exception when .Dispose() is invoked. So it's still wrong. I would question if it was cut-pasted correctly. – Andrew T Finnell Aug 13 '11 at 16:50
1  
@Andrew, also not entirely correct. The implementing class could implement both IDisposable and ITransaction, and in that case a cast could succeed. – JBSnorro Aug 13 '11 at 16:52
    
@JBSnorro You must of missed when I said when it does not inherit. I did not say when ITransaction does not inherit. When the implementation does not inherit from IDisposable at some point in the chain that code will throw and there is no check. – Andrew T Finnell Aug 13 '11 at 16:54

When calling Dipose() on an interface deriving from IDisposable, there is no difference.

There could be a difference when calling Dispose() on a class implementing IDisposable, because the method Dispose() may be implemented explicitly.

share|improve this answer

I don't do this often but I whacked my whole original answer as I understand what Oded is trying to say now. Their intent is to solve this problem:

namespace StackOverflow7051864
{
    using System;

    public interface ITransaction : IDisposable {}

    public interface ITryToConfuseDispose
    {
        void Dispose();
    }

    public class Transaction : ITransaction, ITryToConfuseDispose
    {
        void IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Happy");
        }

        void ITryToConfuseDispose.Dispose()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Confused");
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            EndTransaction(new Transaction());
        }

        public static void EndTransaction(ITransaction transaction)
        {
            (transaction as IDisposable).Dispose();

            transaction.Dispose();            
        }
    }
}

What does 'transaction.Dispose()' invoke? It invokes IDisposable.Dispose()

The problem though, is that since the contract into EndTransaction is ITransaction, it will always invoke the IDisposable version.

share|improve this answer
    
what if ITransaction defines its own Dispose method? – Oded Aug 13 '11 at 17:24
1  
@Oded, the ITransaction has no Dispose method of its own. The Dispose() method is implemented in concrete classes (ex. NHibernateTransaction). I will append the relevant code in my original question shortly. – yanong_banikanhon Aug 13 '11 at 17:27
1  
@Oded That indeed WILL cause problems but I would argue that you still shouldn't be casting to IDisposable to invoke it's Dispose(). The implementor of ITransaction had to use the 'new' keyword on the Dispose() method, meaning they explicitly wanted a different Dispose() to be invoked. I think giving any kind of real world scenario in which this is practical and safe would benefit this question tremendously. – Andrew T Finnell Aug 13 '11 at 17:29

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