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I'm working on a bit-based B/W/Greyscale Pre-Compiled font format, and was having issues with either reading or writing the format, (I've not been able to determine where the issue was. (I do have a B/W bit-based version working, but an Aliased font doesn't look too good, as you can imagine, especially when working with a 320x200 pixel screen) ) but decided that just using a BinaryWriter would be much easier than writing to a bool[] when I pulled the image data.

The basic format of a pixel in the file looks like this:

1 - White Pixel (Shortest, as this would be most of the pixels)

00 - Black Pixel (No reason to write 10-bits for a pure black pixel, which there are a reasonable number of)

01 - Greyscale Pixel, and is followed by 1 byte describing the shade of the pixel

Now, everything is fine and dandy with writing the required info, as that's all full bytes, but the default .Net 4.0 BinaryWriter writes a Boolean value as a full byte, and as you can imagine, that negates the use of a bit-based format. So I was wondering, is there a BinaryWriter, (and BinaryReader) implementation out there that's bit-based

Edit: I ended up creating my own. (See the answer for the code.)

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2  
No, you'll have to create your own. –  Hans Passant Aug 13 '11 at 17:21
1  
@Orvid: consider adding your code as an answer to your thread, as it is a full-blown solution. At S-O we look at the code inside a question as the problem-code, not the solution code. You are allowed to answer your own questions. –  Abel Aug 14 '11 at 9:56
    
Note that you override ReadBoolean and don't read a boolean but a bit. I assume that is on purpose, but because a boolean is one byte large in memory, it may seem odd and unexpected to users of your class, esp. since (this is the MSDN description)[msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…: "Reads a Boolean value from the current stream and advances the current position of the stream by one byte.". In other words, you change the contract. Note that Jon Skeet suggested wrapping the class instead. –  Abel Aug 14 '11 at 10:09
    
@Abel: I hadn't thought about contracts when I wrote the code, and was mostly being lazy, because I didn't want to type all of the method names and arguments out, although now that I think of it, I probably could have gone into my local copy of the Mono sources, and copied the method names from there, then removed the insides of the methods. But since it's already done, I'll leave it as-is. Also, I added the code as an answer to my question instead of in the question. –  Orvid King Aug 15 '11 at 16:38

3 Answers 3

I don't believe there's anything in the framework for this, no. Basically you'd need to write a class to wrap a BinaryWriter (or just a stream) and "the byte written so far" and the number of bits written. When the number of bits gets to 8, write the byte to the underlying stream and clear.

EDIT: the OP posted a possible and working implementation of the above suggestion below.

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Wrapping a BinaryWriter or subclassing a stream is probably good. The OP took the advice the other way and subclassed BinaryWriter. While that seems good at first, it changes the contract for BinaryRead.ReadBoolean and the like: it doesn't read a boolean, it reads a bit, which changes the contract. –  Abel Aug 14 '11 at 10:08

If you keep your data in a byte array (bools are of no use and take too much space, if you use them for bits, they take up a byte in memory) or in an array of a particular struct that fits your dataformat.

Once you have an internal memory representation, you don't need a bit-based binary writer anymore. You can simply write the data to a BinaryWriter and you're done with it.

...but the default .Net 4.0 BinaryWriter writes a Boolean value as a full byte, and as you can imagine, that negates the use of a bit-based format....

The reason for this is: the bool is, by definition, of 1 byte size in C#. The BinaryWriter simply writes what you give it.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I ended up writing my own, so here they are.

The BinaryWriter (I've only overridden the ones that I needed)

private class BinaryWriter : System.IO.BinaryWriter
{
    private bool[] curByte = new bool[8];
    private byte curBitIndx = 0;
    private System.Collections.BitArray ba;

    public BinaryWriter(Stream s) : base(s) { }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        base.Write(ConvertToByte(curByte));
        base.Flush();
    }

    public override void Write(bool value)
    {
        curByte[curBitIndx] = value;
        curBitIndx++;

        if (curBitIndx == 8)
        {
            base.Write(ConvertToByte(curByte));
            this.curBitIndx = 0;
            this.curByte = new bool[8];
        }
    }

    public override void Write(byte value)
    {
        ba = new BitArray(new byte[] { value });
        for (byte i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        {
            this.Write(ba[i]);
        }
        ba = null;
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < buffer.Length; i++)
        {
            this.Write((byte)buffer[i]);
        }
    }

    public override void Write(uint value)
    {
        ba = new BitArray(BitConverter.GetBytes(value));
        for (byte i = 0; i < 32; i++)
        {
            this.Write(ba[i]);
        }
        ba = null;
    }

    public override void Write(ulong value)
    {
        ba = new BitArray(BitConverter.GetBytes(value));
        for (byte i = 0; i < 64; i++)
        {
            this.Write(ba[i]);
        }
        ba = null;
    }

    public override void Write(ushort value)
    {
        ba = new BitArray(BitConverter.GetBytes(value));
        for (byte i = 0; i < 16; i++)
        {
            this.Write(ba[i]);
        }
        ba = null;
    }

    private static byte ConvertToByte(bool[] bools)
    {
        byte b = 0;

        byte bitIndex = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        {
            if (bools[i])
            {
                b |= (byte)(((byte)1) << bitIndex);
            }
            bitIndex++;
        }

        return b;
    }
}

And, the BinaryReader, once again, I've only overridden the methods that I needed.

private class BinaryReader : System.IO.BinaryReader
{
    private bool[] curByte = new bool[8];
    private byte curBitIndx = 0;
    private BitArray ba;

    public BinaryReader(Stream s) : base(s)
    {
        ba = new BitArray(new byte[] { base.ReadByte() });
        ba.CopyTo(curByte, 0);
        ba = null;
    }

    public override bool ReadBoolean()
    {
        if (curBitIndx == 8)
        {
            ba = new BitArray(new byte[] { base.ReadByte() });
            ba.CopyTo(curByte, 0);
            ba = null;
            this.curBitIndx = 0;
        }

        bool b = curByte[curBitIndx];
        curBitIndx++;
        return b;
    }

    public override byte ReadByte()
    {
        bool[] bar = new bool[8];
        byte i;
        for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        {
            bar[i] = this.ReadBoolean();
        }

        byte b = 0;
        byte bitIndex = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        {
            if (bar[i])
            {
                b |= (byte)(((byte)1) << bitIndex);
            }
            bitIndex++;
        }
        return b;
    }

    public override byte[] ReadBytes(int count)
    {
        byte[] bytes = new byte[count];
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            bytes[i] = this.ReadByte();
        }
        return bytes;
    }

    public override ushort ReadUInt16()
    {
        byte[] bytes = ReadBytes(2);
        return BitConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, 0);
    }

    public override uint ReadUInt32()
    {
        byte[] bytes = ReadBytes(4);
        return BitConverter.ToUInt32(bytes, 0);
    }

    public override ulong ReadUInt64()
    {
        byte[] bytes = ReadBytes(8);
        return BitConverter.ToUInt64(bytes, 0);
    }
}
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