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I have written this Javascript to convert a timestamp to something readable. It works perfectly. However I need to do it with PHP but don't know how. Obviously I don't want an alert of the time, but I'd like to have it as a PHP variable. Any ideas?

<script>
var bmsTime ="39845.03";
var date = new Date('31 dec 1899');
date.setTime(date.getTime() + bmsTime* 24 * 60 * 60 *1000);

alert (date);
</script>
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What is the format of the JavaScript date output? – Bojangles Aug 13 '11 at 18:04

Use the date function, it takes an additional parameter called timestamp. But in php timestamp is number of seconds, not milliseconds as in javascript, so divide it by 1 000:

echo date('l jS \of F Y h:i:s A', $javascript_timestamp / 1000);
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teach a man to fish: tinyurl.com/ybydqvp – Jacksonkr Aug 13 '11 at 18:08
    
@Jackson added a little remark about seconds – Greenisha Aug 13 '11 at 18:11

The short answer: You cannot properly do this, as you do not know the timezone the browser/client is using.

Long answer (using the server timezone - or whatever is configured for PHP):

$bmsTime = 39845.03;
$date = mktime(0, 0, 0, 12, 31, 1899);
$date += $bmsTime * 24 * 60 * 60; // $date are the seconds relative to "the epoc" (1970-01-01 UTC)

echo date('c', $date);
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u're wrong. U don't need to multiply by 1000, because PHP timestamp is in seconds, not milliseconds as JS – Greenisha Aug 13 '11 at 18:16
    
@Greenisha Fixed it, thanks. – Shi Aug 13 '11 at 18:25
    
@Shi it seems mktime won't allow me go before the epoch. – Peter Aug 13 '11 at 19:17
    
@Peter What does it do? var_dump(mktime(0, 0, 0, 12, 31, 1899)); returns int(-2209075200) here, so it works for me in PHP 5.3.5. Maybe: Before PHP 5.1.0, negative timestamps were not supported under any known version of Windows and some other systems as well. Therefore the range of valid years was limited to 1970 through 2038. -- php.net/manual/en/function.mktime.php – Shi Aug 13 '11 at 19:20

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