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I was trying to do some analysis on calling start and join simultaneously,

    //Starting and Joining 
    for (Thread thread : threadArray) {
        thread.start();
        thread.join();
    }

compared with start first and then join.

    //Starting Them
    for (Thread thread : threadArray) {
        thread.start();
    }
    //Joining Them
    for (Thread thread : threadArray) {
        thread.join();
    }

What would be the performance difference between the above two cases?.

In the first scenario, I am pretty much guaranteeing that the order of execution is sequential between threads. So if I have n threads and say each thread takes Ti time to complete the task, my total time of execution should be sum of Tis from 1 to n.

In the second scenario, I am starting off and then joining. This is the part which I am getting confused. Shouldn't the time be almost same as above?. What I am seeing is almost double on my machine.

The entire code sample I am using is given below.

public class ThreadJoin implements Runnable {

    public void run() {
        for (int i=0;i<10000000;i++) {
            //Random mathematical stuff independent of i.
             int ran = (int) (Math.random()*1000 -34)%47;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Thread[] threadArray = new Thread[10];
        //Creating threads and feeding them with the job
        for (int i=0;i<10;i++) {
            threadArray[i] = new Thread(new ThreadJoin());
        }
        long currentTimeMillis = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Started at " + currentTimeMillis);
        //Starting Them
        for (Thread thread : threadArray) {
            thread.start();
        }
        //Joining Them
        for (Thread thread : threadArray) {
            thread.join();
        }
        long currentTimeMillis2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Ended at " + currentTimeMillis2);
        System.out.println("Diff : " +( currentTimeMillis2 - currentTimeMillis));
    }

}
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What do you mean by "almost same as above"? And how many cores does your machine have? –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '11 at 18:22
    
"almost same as above" means starting and joining in one loop. I am on a 2 core machine. ark.intel.com/products/43537 –  Ajay George Aug 13 '11 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In theory, starting first all the threads and then joining them all should allow your 10 threads to execute concurrently (i.e. at the same time), while starting and joining the threads in one loop will make them run in parallel.

So, in theory, the two-loop variant should be faster. Why is it actually slower (if I understand this right)?

You are using Math.random() in your loop quite heavily. In fact, I suppose most of the work occurs in this method. Math.random() is a synchronized method - this means that only one thread at a time can execute it, and the other ones have to wait until the previous one is finished.

So, you can't really get faster than sequentially here. It actually gets slower since you have lots of context switches between your many threads, most of which will then find out they can't continue since another thread already has the lock.

To make your program faster, let each thread have its own java.util.Random() object, and call its nextRandom() method instead. (You might want to make sure that they are initialized with different seeds, though.)

As mentioned in the comment from Tomek, from Java 7 on there is the ThreadLocalRandom class, which organizes such a pool of Random objects per thread and exposes the one for the current thread by its current() method. (I did never use this, so I can't comment on the performance compared to doing this manually.)

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Thanks Paulo. The Math.random is indeed the culprit. Tried my benchmark with something else and the "two-loop" one runs faster. –  Ajay George Aug 13 '11 at 20:17
    
Java provides also useful ThreadLocalRandom class. –  Tomek Rękawek Oct 3 '13 at 16:29

The second version (start all threads, then join all threads) allows the threads to run in parallel so it should be faster (shorter total time) on multi-processor or multicore machines. But Math.random() is synchronized which can make it actually slower.

From the documentation of Math.random():

This method is properly synchronized to allow correct use by more than one thread. However, if many threads need to generate pseudorandom numbers at a great rate, it may reduce contention for each thread to have its own pseudorandom-number generator.

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When you have a loop which doesn't do anything, the server JIT can detect this eliminate it. The first time you call the loop, there is a small delay before it detects the loop doesn't do anything, but the second time you call it will be much faster.

My advice is that you use a Thread pool if you care how long it takes to start and stop threads. It almost eliminates the need to do so and you won't get faster than that.

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Hi Peter, I understand the JIT compilation part, but what perplexed me was this behaviour. –  Ajay George Aug 13 '11 at 20:19

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