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Some code that I had that used attr_accessor_with_default in a rails model is now giving me a deprecation warning, telling me to "Use Ruby instead!"

So, thinking that maybe there was a new bit in ruby 1.9.2 that made attr_accessor handle defaults, I googled it, but I don't see that. I did see a bunch of methods to override attr_accessor to handle defaults though.

Is that what they mean when they tell me to "Use Ruby?" Or am I supposed to write full getters/setters now? Or is there some new way I can't find?

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I don't consider this best practice in any way. Though I'm curious why you want to use such a pattern. –  Philip Dec 27 '11 at 12:33
6  
Very simply because I want a bool to default to true. Why wouldn't this be a best practice? At the time it was a language feature, very succinct and easily read. –  Dave Sanders Dec 27 '11 at 15:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted
attr_accessor :pancakes

def after_initialize
     return unless new_record?
     self.pancakes = 11
end

This ensures that the value is initialized to some default for new record only.

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7  
This seems to be dependent on ActiveRecord. FYI for the next person to come along. –  jcollum Jan 18 '12 at 20:38
    
+1 for pancakes –  joonty May 14 '13 at 9:01

This apidock page suggests to just do it in the initialize method.

class Something
  attr_accessor :pancakes

  def initialize 
    @pancakes = true
    super
  end
end

Don't forget to call super especially when using ActiveRecord or similar.

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1  
By the way: this should be the validated answer, as it comes without any dependency. –  jdvauguet Oct 14 '13 at 12:19

Since you probably know your data quite well, it can be quite acceptable to assume nil is not a valid value.

This means you can do away with an after_initialize, as this will be executed for every object you create. As several people have pointed out, this is (potentially) disastrous for performance. Also, inlining the method as in the example is deprecated in Rails 3.1 anyway.

To 'use Ruby instead' I would take this approach:

attr_writer :pancakes

def pancakes
  return 12 if @pancakes.nil?
  @pancakes
end

So trim down the Ruby magic just a little bit and write your own getter. After all this does exactly what you are trying to accomplish, and it's nice and simple enough for anyone to wrap his/her head around.

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Sorry, but that's too much bloat/makes everything to complex if used often. But if you really really want to take that road: def pancakes ; @pancakes || 12 ; end –  Philip Dec 27 '11 at 12:32
    
Hey, thanks for the downvote (not)! Your "improvement" has a serious flaw. It will return true when the value of the instance variable is false. You see that is exactly wrong? Great. This is why I added the "bloat" to check for nil instead. Which, depending on the circumstances, can be quite acceptable. –  Joost Baaij Dec 27 '11 at 15:19
    
I upvoted it back up, because its a valid answer. My only question would be, when the object is saved, is it going to use that default because the save is going to use that accessor? Or would you still have to have the default in the table, meaning tracking it in two places which is "bad." I guess I could just go try it out. :) And to write the "bloat" on one line you could just write: def pancakes; @pancakes.nil? ? 12 : @pancakes; end. :) –  Dave Sanders Dec 27 '11 at 15:43
    
I generally prefer one-liners def pancakes ; @pancakes.nil? ? 12 : @pancakes ; end. –  Dorian Apr 18 '12 at 13:10
1  
Why would anybody want to have a boolean field that has nil values masked as value 12? O.O Wow.. don't do that. It's insane. Life don't need to be this complicated. –  Timo Lehto Oct 9 '12 at 3:28

There's nothing magical in 1.9.2 for initializing instance variables that you set up with attr_accessor. But there is the after_initialize callback:

The after_initialize callback will be called whenever an Active Record object is instantiated, either by directly using new or when a record is loaded from the database. It can be useful to avoid the need to directly override your Active Record initialize method.

So:

attr_accessor :pancakes
after_initialize :init

protected
def init
    @pancakes = 11
end

This is safer than something like this:

def pancakes
    @pancakes ||= 11
end

because nil or false might be perfectly valid values after initialization and assuming that they're not can cause some interesting bugs.

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Just a warning that if you do Post.all and it returns a set of 1,000 Post objects, it's going to run this after_initialize callback on all of them. Not the end of the world, but something to be aware of as you scale. –  coreyward Aug 13 '11 at 19:36
1  
@coreyward: If you do Post.all in real code then an extra 1000 method calls is the least of your worries. –  mu is too short Aug 13 '11 at 19:46
    
True, but if it's in the Rails Getting Started Guide, it's in lot's of new-Rails-developer codebases. ;) –  coreyward Aug 13 '11 at 19:50
    
Makes sense, and I wouldn't use Post.all. However, with Rails desire to simplify everything why the heck would they deprecate _with_default? –  Dave Sanders Aug 15 '11 at 13:01
    
@Vulgrin: I don't know, sometimes the Rails people ave more attitude than sense (that should get me some dirty looks :) –  mu is too short Aug 15 '11 at 17:54

I'm wondering if just using Rails implementation would work for you:

http://apidock.com/rails/Module/attr_accessor_with_default

def attr_accessor_with_default(sym, default = nil, &block)
  raise 'Default value or block required' unless !default.nil? || block
  define_method(sym, block_given? ? block : Proc.new { default })
  module_eval(      def #{sym}=(value)                        # def age=(value)        class << self; attr_reader :#{sym} end  #   class << self; attr_reader :age end        @#{sym} = value                         #   @age = value      end                                       # end, __FILE__, __LINE__ + 1)
end
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This is an ooooold question, but the general problem still crops up - and I found myself here.

The other answers are varied and interesting, but I found problems with all of them when initializing arrays (especially as I wanted to be able to use them at a class level before initialize was called on the instance). I had success with:

attr_writer :pancakes

def pancakes
  @pancakes ||= []
end

If you use = instead of ||= you will find that the << operator fails for adding the first element to the array. (An anonymous array is created, a value is assigned to it, but it's never assigned back to @pancakes.)

For example:

obj.pancakes
#=> []
obj.pancakes << 'foo'
#=> ['foo']
obj.pancakes
#=> [] 
#???#!%$#@%FRAK!!!

As this is quite a subtle problem and could cause a few head scratches, I thought it was worth mentioning here.

This pattern will need to be altered for a bool, for example if you want to default to false:

attr_writer :pancakes

def pancakes
  @pancakes.nil? ? @pancakes = false : @pancakes
end

Although you could argue that the assignment isn't strictly necessary when dealing with a bool.

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