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Currently I am working with some Mathematica code to do a Picard Iteration. The code itself works fine but I am trying to make it more efficient. I have had some success but am looking for suggestions. It may not be possible to speed it up anymore but I have run out of ideas and am hoping people with more experience with programming/Mathematica than me might be able to make some suggestions. I am only posting the Iteration itself but can supply additional information as needed.

The code below was edited to be a fully executable as requested

Also I changed it from a While to a Do loop to make testing easier as convergence is not required.

Clear["Global`*"]

ngrid = 2048;
delr = 4/100;
delk = \[Pi]/delr/ngrid;
rvalues = Table[(i - 1/2) delr, {i, 1, ngrid}];
kvalues = Table[(i - 1/2) delk, {i, 1, ngrid}];
wa[x_] := (19 + .5 x) Exp[-.7 x] + 1
wb[x_] := (19 + .1 x) Exp[-.2 x] + 1
wd = SetPrecision[
   Table[{{wa[(i - 1/2) delk], 0}, {0, wb[(i - 1/2) delk]}}, {i, 1, 
     ngrid}], 26];
sigmaAA = 1;
hcloseAA = {};
i = 1;
While[(i - 1/2)*delr < sigmaAA, hcloseAA = Append[hcloseAA, -1]; i++]
hcloselenAA = Length[hcloseAA];
hcloseAB = hcloseAA;
hcloselenAB = hcloselenAA;
hcloseBB = hcloseAA;
hcloselenBB = hcloselenAA;
ccloseAA = {};
i = ngrid;
While[(i - 1/2)*delr >= sigmaAA, ccloseAA = Append[ccloseAA, 0]; i--]
ccloselenAA = Length[ccloseAA];
ccloselenAA = Length[ccloseAA];
ccloseAB = ccloseAA;
ccloselenAB = ccloselenAA;
ccloseBB = ccloseAA;
ccloselenBB = ccloselenAA;
na = 20;
nb = 20;
pa = 27/(1000 \[Pi]);
pb = 27/(1000 \[Pi]);
p = {{na pa, 0}, {0, nb pb}};
id = {{1, 0}, {0, 1}};
AFD = 1;
AFDList = {};
timelist = {};
gammainitial = Table[{{0, 0}, {0, 0}}, {ngrid}];
gammafirst = gammainitial;
step = 1;
tol = 10^-7;
old = 95/100;
new = 1 - old;

Do[
 t = AbsoluteTime[];
 extractgAA = Table[Extract[gammafirst, {i, 1, 1}], {i, hcloselenAA}];
 extractgBB = Table[Extract[gammafirst, {i, 2, 2}], {i, hcloselenBB}];
 extractgAB = Table[Extract[gammafirst, {i, 1, 2}], {i, hcloselenAB}];
 csolutionAA = (Join[hcloseAA - extractgAA, ccloseAA]) rvalues;
 csolutionBB = (Join[hcloseBB - extractgBB, ccloseBB]) rvalues;
 csolutionAB = (Join[hcloseAB - extractgAB, ccloseAB]) rvalues;
 chatAA = FourierDST[SetPrecision[csolutionAA, 32], 4];
 chatBB = FourierDST[SetPrecision[csolutionBB, 32], 4];
 chatAB = FourierDST[SetPrecision[csolutionAB, 32], 4];
 chatmatrix = 
  2 \[Pi] delr Sqrt[2*ngrid]*
   Transpose[{Transpose[{chatAA, chatAB}], 
      Transpose[{chatAB, chatBB}]}]/kvalues;
 gammahat = 
  Table[(wd[[i]].chatmatrix[[i]].(Inverse[
         id - p.wd[[i]].chatmatrix[[i]]]).wd[[i]] - 
      chatmatrix[[i]]) kvalues[[i]], {i, ngrid}];
 gammaAA = 
  FourierDST[SetPrecision[Table[gammahat[[i, 1, 1]], {i, ngrid}], 32],
    4];
 gammaBB = 
  FourierDST[SetPrecision[Table[gammahat[[i, 2, 2]], {i, ngrid}], 32],
    4];
 gammaAB = 
  FourierDST[SetPrecision[Table[gammahat[[i, 1, 2]], {i, ngrid}], 32],
    4];
 gammasecond = 
  Transpose[{Transpose[{gammaAA, gammaAB}], 
     Transpose[{gammaAB, gammaBB}]}]/(rvalues 2 \[Pi] delr Sqrt[
      2*ngrid]);
 AFD = Sqrt[
    1/ngrid Sum[((gammafirst[[i, 1, 1]] - 
           gammasecond[[i, 1, 1]])/(gammafirst[[i, 1, 1]] + 
           gammasecond[[i, 1, 1]]))^2 + ((gammafirst[[i, 2, 2]] - 
           gammasecond[[i, 2, 2]])/(gammafirst[[i, 2, 2]] + 
           gammasecond[[i, 2, 2]]))^2 + ((gammafirst[[i, 1, 2]] - 
           gammasecond[[i, 1, 2]])/(gammafirst[[i, 1, 2]] + 
           gammasecond[[i, 1, 2]]))^2 + ((gammafirst[[i, 2, 1]] - 
           gammasecond[[i, 2, 1]])/(gammafirst[[i, 2, 1]] + 
           gammasecond[[i, 2, 1]]))^2, {i, 1, ngrid}]];
 gammafirst = old gammafirst + new gammasecond;
 time2 = AbsoluteTime[] - t;
 timelist = Append[timelist, time2], {1}]
Print["Mean time per calculation = ", Mean[timelist]]
Print["STD time per calculation = ", StandardDeviation[timelist]]

Just some notes on things
ngrid,delr, delk, rvalues, kvalues are just the values used in making the problem discrete. Typically they are

ngrid = 2048;
delr = 4/100;
delk = \[Pi]/delr/ngrid;
rvalues = Table[(i - 1/2) delr, {i, 1, ngrid}];
kvalues = Table[(i - 1/2) delk, {i, 1, ngrid}];

All matrices being used are 2 x 2 with identical off-diagonals

The identity matrix and the P matrix(it is actually for the density) are

p = {{na pa, 0}, {0, nb pb}};
id = {{1, 0}, {0, 1}};

The major slow spots in the calculation I have identified are the FourierDST calculations (the forward and back transforms account for close to 40% of the calculation time) The gammahat calculation accounts for 40% of the time with the remaining time dominated by the AFD calculation.) On my i7 Processor the average calculation time per cycle is 1.52 seconds. My hope is to get it under a second but that may not be possible. My hope had been to introduce some parallel computation this was tried with both ParallelTable commands as well as using the ParallelSubmit WaitAll. However, I found that any speedup from the parallel calculation was offset by the communication time from the Master Kernel to the the other Kernels.(at least that is my assumption as calculations on new data takes twice as long as just recalculating the existing data. I assumed this meant that the slowdown was in disseminating the new lists) I played around with DistributDefinitions as well as SetSharedVariable, however, was unable to get that to do anything.

One thing I am wondering is if using Table for doing my discrete calculations is the best way to do this?

I had also thought I could possibly rewrite this in such a manner as to be able to compile it but my understanding is that only will work if you are dealing with machine precision where I am needing to working with higher precision to get convergence.

Thank you in advance for any suggestions.

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5  
it would be easier to try to answer if you provided code that can immediately be executed (so that people can play with it without first understanding the details of the algorithm). –  acl Aug 13 '11 at 20:29
2  
@ACL, the term for what are correctly asking for is SSCCE, here is more information sscce.org "If you are having a problem with some code and seeking help, preparing a Short, Self Contained, Correct Example (SSCCE) is very useful." –  Nasser Aug 13 '11 at 23:10
    
I have updated the code to be SSCCE :) –  user573214 Aug 14 '11 at 17:34
    
This now belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Mr.Wizard Aug 15 '11 at 18:50
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2 Answers

I will wait for the code acl suggests, but off the top, I suspect that this construct:

Table[Extract[gammafirst, {i, 1, 1}], {i, hcloselenAA}]

may be written, and will execute faster, as:

gammafirst[[hcloselenAA, 1, 1]]

But I am forced to guess the shape of your data.

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In the several lines using:

FourierDST[SetPrecision[Table[gammahat[[i, 1, 1]], {i, ngrid}], 32], 4];

you could remove the Table:

FourierDST[SetPrecision[gammahat[[All, 1, 1]], 32], 4];

And, if you really, really need this SetPrecision, couldn't you do it at once in the calculation of gammahat?

AFAI can see, all numbers used in the calculations of gammahat are exact. This may be on purpose but it is slow. You might consider using approximate numbers instead.

EDIT
With the complete code in your latest edit just adding an //N to your 2nd and 3rd line cuts timing at least in half without reducing numerical accuracy much. If I compare all the numbers in res={gammafirst, gammasecond, AFD} the difference between the original and with //N added is res1 - res2 // Flatten // Total ==> 1.88267*10^-13

Removing all the SetPrecision stuff speeds up the code by a factor of 7 and the results seem to be of similar accuracy.

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Thank you for your suggestions. I am going to try them out. I am looking back over my notes and unfortunately I never wrote down why the high precision was needed other than something with convergence not working out without it but that could be incorrect so I will retest it. –  user573214 Aug 15 '11 at 1:14
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