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Python gives us the ability to create 'private' methods and variables within a class by prepending double underscores to the name, like this: __myPrivateMethod(). How, then, can one explain this

>>> class MyClass:
...     def myPublicMethod(self):
...             print 'public method'
...     def __myPrivateMethod(self):
...             print 'this is private!!'
... 
>>> obj = MyClass()
>>> obj.myPublicMethod()
public method
>>> obj.__myPrivateMethod()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
AttributeError: MyClass instance has no attribute '__myPrivateMethod'
>>> dir(obj)
['_MyClass__myPrivateMethod', '__doc__', '__module__', 'myPublicMethod']
>>> obj._MyClass__myPrivateMethod()
this is private!!

What's the deal?!

I'll explain this a little for those who didn't quite get that.

>>> class MyClass:
...     def myPublicMethod(self):
...             print 'public method'
...     def __myPrivateMethod(self):
...             print 'this is private!!'
... 
>>> obj = MyClass()

What I did there is create a class with a public method and a private method and instantiate it.

Next, I call its public method.

>>> obj.myPublicMethod()
public method

Next, I try and call its private method.

>>> obj.__myPrivateMethod()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
AttributeError: MyClass instance has no attribute '__myPrivateMethod'

Everything looks good here; we're unable to call it. It is, in fact, 'private'. Well, actually it isn't. Running dir() on the object reveals a new magical method that python creates magically for all of your 'private' methods.

>>> dir(obj)
['_MyClass__myPrivateMethod', '__doc__', '__module__', 'myPublicMethod']

This new method's name is always an underscore, followed by the class name, followed by the method name.

>>> obj._MyClass__myPrivateMethod()
this is private!!

So much for encapsulation, eh?

In any case, I'd always heard Python doesn't support encapsulation, so why even try? What gives?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 209 down vote accepted

The name scrambling is used to ensure that subclasses don't accidentally override the private methods and attributes of their superclasses. It's not designed to prevent deliberate access from outside.

For example:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def __init__(self):
...         self.__baz = 42
...     def foo(self):
...         print self.__baz
...     
>>> class Bar(Foo):
...     def __init__(self):
...         super(Bar, self).__init__()
...         self.__baz = 21
...     def bar(self):
...         print self.__baz
...
>>> x = Bar()
>>> x.foo()
42
>>> x.bar()
21
>>> print x.__dict__
{'_Bar__baz': 21, '_Foo__baz': 42}

Of course, it breaks down if two different classes have the same name.

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11  
Very cool. I had no idea you could do that. –  willurd Sep 16 '08 at 17:51
2  
Is this so? Where did you get that from? –  miya Feb 18 '09 at 12:17
    
docs.python.org/2/tutorial/classes.html. Section:9.6 on Private variables and class-local references. –  gjain Oct 17 '13 at 0:41
5  
For those of us too lazy to scroll/search: Section 9.6 direct link –  cod3monk3y Feb 20 at 4:22
    
Nice--a positive reason! I had read/heard that this was just to discourage deliberate access from outside (without actually blocking it). Glad to see that there are additional benefits too. –  J Coombs Mar 15 at 6:49
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Example of private function

import re
import inspect

class MyClass :

    def __init__(self) :
        pass

    def private_function ( self ) :
        try :
            function_call = inspect.stack()[1][4][0].strip()

            # See if the function_call has "self." in the begining
            matched = re.match( '^self\.', function_call )
            if not matched :
                print 'This is Private Function, Go Away'
                return
        except :
            print 'This is Private Function, Go Away'
            return

        # This is the real Function, only accessible inside class #
        print 'Hey, Welcome in to function'

    def public_function ( self ) :
        # i can call private function from inside the class
        self.private_function()

### End ###
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61  
+1 This made me laugh :) –  Thomas Ahle Aug 12 '10 at 21:47
4  
self = MyClass() self.private_function(). :D Of course it doesn't work in classes, but you just have to define a custom function: def foo(self): self.private_function() –  Darthfett May 8 '12 at 16:34
5  
Just in case it wasn't clear: never do this in real code ;) –  Sudo Bash Jul 12 '13 at 15:40
6  
arun got all his rep from this, that's quite funny too :) –  Maresh Oct 23 '13 at 14:29
    
I wouldn't bother loading regex just to test a /^.../ expression, save some time and use 0 == function_call.index('self.') –  ThorSummoner Jul 2 at 23:32
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From http://www.faqs.org/docs/diveintopython/fileinfo_private.html

Strictly speaking, private methods are accessible outside their class, just not easily accessible. Nothing in Python is truly private; internally, the names of private methods and attributes are mangled and unmangled on the fly to make them seem inaccessible by their given names. You can access the __parse method of the MP3FileInfo class by the name _MP3FileInfo__parse. Acknowledge that this is interesting, then promise to never, ever do it in real code. Private methods are private for a reason, but like many other things in Python, their privateness is ultimately a matter of convention, not force.

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131  
or as Guido van Rossum put it: "we are all adults." –  hop Oct 6 '08 at 11:20
18  
-1: this is just wrong. Double underscores is never meant to be used as private in first place. The answer from Alya below tells the real intention of name mangling syntax. The real convention is a single underscore. –  nosklo Oct 15 '09 at 14:02
64  
ok, kids, wait 'til you grow up to drink, smoke and access private variables. –  mike Apr 28 '10 at 23:32
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When I first came from Java to Python i hated this. It scared me to death.

Today it might just be the one thing I love most about Python.

I love being on a platform, where people trust each other and don't feel like they need to build impenetrable walls around their code. In strongly encapsulated languages, if an API has a bug, and you have figured out what goes wrong, you may still be unable to work around it because the needed method is private. In Python the attitude is: "sure". If you think you understand the situation, perhaps you have even read it, then all we can say is "good luck!".

Remember, encapsulation is not even weakly related to "security", or keeping the kids off the lawn. It is just another pattern that should be used to make a code base easier to understand.

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23  
@CamJackson Javascript is your example?? The only widely used language that has prototybe-based inheritance and a language that favors functional programming? I think JS is a lot harder to learn than most of the other languages, since it takes several orthogonal steps from traditional OOP. Not that this prevents idiots from writing JS, they just don't know it ;) –  K.Steff Apr 10 '12 at 1:45
4  
@K.Steff - My main beef with Javascript (and HTML) is the design philosophy that the browser should go to all kinds of trouble to automatically correct errors in order to make dodgy code work. For example, semicolons being optional causes things like this. I would rather the code in that example just not run at all, and tell me why, instead of 'helpfully' guessing at what the forgetful programmer might have meant. All that said, my comment wasn't intended entirely seriously, and of course Javascript has its pros and cons like any language :) –  Cam Jackson Jun 22 '12 at 11:14
    
@Sudar Yes, when we're talking about the culture of forcing programmers to write things in a certain way, Java is probably a better 'opposite' to Python in that regard. But Javascript annoys me in other ways :P (see my last comment) –  Cam Jackson Jun 22 '12 at 11:16
    
APIs are actually a really good example of why encapsulation matters and when private methods would be preferred. A method intended to be private may go away, change signature, or worst of all change behavior -- all without warning -- on any subsequent new version. Will your smart, adult team member really remember that she accessed an intended-to-be-private method a year from now when you update? Will she even be working there anymore? –  einnocent Jan 10 at 0:35
    
I disagree with the argument. In production code, I would most probably never use an API that has a bug that makes me change public members to make it "work". An API should work. If it doesn't, I would file a bug report or make the same API myself. I don't like the philosophy and I am not very fond of Python, although its syntax makes it fun to write smaller scripts in... –  Yngve Sneen Lindal Feb 19 at 11:45
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The phrase commonly used is "we're all consenting adults here". By prepending a single underscore (don't expose) or double underscore (hide), you're telling the user of your class that you intend the member to be 'private' in some way. However, you're trusting everyone else to behave responsibly and respect that, unless they have a compelling reason not to (e.g. debuggers, code completion).

If you truly must have something that is private, then you can implement it in an extension (e.g. in C for CPython). In most cases, however, you simply learn the Pythonic way of doing things.

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so is there some sort of wrapper protocol that I'm supposed to use to access a protected variable? –  intuited May 10 '10 at 18:56
2  
There aren't "protected" variables any more than there are "private". If you want to access an attribute that starts with an underscore, you can just do it (but note that the author discourages this). If you must access an attribute that starts with a double underscore, you can do the name mangling yourself, but you almost certainly do not want to do this. –  Tony Meyer May 13 '10 at 8:41
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It's not like you absolutly can't get around privateness of members in any language (pointer arithmetics in C++, Reflections in .NET/Java).

The point is that you get an error if you try to call the private method by accident. But if you want to shoot yourself in the foot, go ahead and do it.

Edit: You don't try to secure your stuff by OO-encapsulation, do you?

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Not at all. I'm simply making the point that it's odd to give the developer an easy, and in my opinion way to magical, way of accessing 'private' properties. –  willurd Sep 16 '08 at 9:11
1  
Yeah, I just tried to illustrate the point. Making it private just says "you shouldn't access this directly" by making the compiler complain. But one wants to really really do it he can. But yes, it's easier in Python than in most other languages. –  Maximilian Sep 16 '08 at 9:26
3  
In Java, you actually can secure stuff via encapsulation, but that requires you to be smart and run the untrusted code in a SecurityManager, and be very careful. Even Oracle gets it wrong sometimes. –  Antimony Apr 24 '13 at 1:16
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The class.__stuff naming convention lets the programmer know he isn't meant to access __stuff from outside. The name mangling makes it unlikely anyone will do it by accident.

True, you still can work around this, it's even easier than in other languages (which BTW also let you do this), but no Python programmer would do this if he cares about encapsulation.

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Similar behavior exists when module attribute names begin with a single underscore (e.g. _foo).

Module attributes named as such will not be copied into an importing module when using the from* method, e.g.:

from bar import *

However, this is a convention and not a language constraint. These are not private attributes; they can be referenced and manipulated by any importer. Some argue that because of this, Python can not implement true encapsulation.

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Its just one of those language design choices. On some level they are justified. They make it so you need to go pretty far out of your way to try and call the method, and if you really need it that badly, you must have a pretty good reason! Debugging hooks and testing come to mind as possible applications, used responsibly of course.

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