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Edit: Let us assume the classes actually do not share an interface! Major slip on my part...


For reasons unknown to me there are for example two WPF classes which both have the same method with the same signature:

So i have been wondering (for the heck of it) how i should construct a method (e.g. typechecking & exceptions) which ultimately calls the above mentioned method.

(I will be posting what i would be inclined to do but i am looking for what more experienced people would recommend.)

share|improve this question
    
Are you know type of instance of which method you want to invoke? or it is object? – hazzik Aug 13 '11 at 20:38
    
@hazzik: Just consider a method which gets some object it wants to call a specific method on, the only thing that is known is the method name and its signature and that the method exists in certain types (known by name), so inside the designed method the input either needs to casted, or you can try reflection/dynamic. – H.B. Aug 13 '11 at 20:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

My approach:

public static void Animate(object target)
{
    target.ThrowIfNull(); //Extension
    if (!(target is Animatable || target is UIElement))
        throw new ArgumentException("The target is not animatable");

    //Construct animation

    (target as dynamic).BeginAnimation(property, animation);
}
share|improve this answer

In the case that you have proposed, both classes share the same interface IAnimatable.

((IAnimatable)target).BeginAnimation(property, animation);

Should be sufficient

Here is the documentation

share|improve this answer
    
Oh what, i thought i had actually checked for a common interface -.- this is somewhat unfortunate. – H.B. Aug 13 '11 at 20:26
    
Appreciate your answer but i have edited my question to be concerned with the unlikely case of a rather crappy architecture where there is no interface. Sorry. – H.B. Aug 13 '11 at 20:29
    
I am glad you did, it is a question I often ask myself. There must be a common example of this that I can't think of at the moment. – Gene C Aug 13 '11 at 20:35
public static void Animate(this object target, DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
{
    target.ThrowIfNull();
    DoAnimate(target as dynamic);
}

private static void DoAnimate(object target, DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
{
    throw new ArgumentException("The target is not animatable")
}

private static void DoAnimate(Animatable target, DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
{
    target.BeginAnimation(property, animation);
}

private static void DoAnimate(UIElement target, DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
{
    target.BeginAnimation(property, animation);
}

In my point of view it is cleaner.

UPDATED Example with AnimationContext

class AnimationContext
{
    private readonly DependencyProperty property;
    private readonly AnimationTimeline animation;

    public AnimationContext(DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
    {
        this.property = property;
        this.animation = animation;
    }

    public void Animate(UIElement target)
    {
        target.BeginAnimation(property, animation);
    }

    public void Animate(Animatable target)
    {
        target.BeginAnimation(property, animation);
    }

    public void Animate(object target)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("The target is not animatable");
    }
}

static class AnimateExtensions
{
    public static void Animate(this object target, DependencyProperty property, AnimationTimeline animation)
    {
        target.ThrowIfNull();
        new AnimationContext(property, animation).Animate(target as dynamic);
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Overloads - nice. – Igby Largeman Aug 13 '11 at 20:56
    
Hmm, the methods would need arguments for property and animation, which causes quite a long signature. – H.B. Aug 13 '11 at 21:03
    
You can encapsulate additional arguments into a single parameter object (refactoring.com/catalog/introduceParameterObject.html) to reduce signature – hazzik Aug 13 '11 at 21:08
    
Updated my answer, added example with parameter object – hazzik Aug 13 '11 at 21:19
    
@hazzik: I think there is a small problem with the execution time of the various parts, in my method the preventive conditions are checked first, and if the condition is not met an exception is thrown right away, after that part the animation is contructed (the main method is not supposed to take the property and animation as parameter, it should be created in the method, otherwise the whole thing is pointless), so when doing it your way the contruction of the animation will have to happen before it is even clear whether the target is animatable. – H.B. Aug 13 '11 at 22:05

After your edit on the two classes not inheriting from the same interface, the answer would be to use one of the following:

  1. Reflection
  2. Dynamic

None of these would of course check that the method exists until runtime, but I think that is kind of implied in the question.

Given the following two classes A and B, which contain a method with the same signature, but do not implement the same interface:

class A
    public void Handle(string s) {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello from A: " + s);
    }
}

and:

class B
    public void Handle(string s) {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello from B: " + s);
    }
}

You can create a method that handles any object that has a method with that signature, like this:

static void HandleObject(dynamic anything) {
    anything.Handle("It works!");
}

The HandleObject will basically take any object as input, and at runtime try to blindly call a method called Handle on it. If the object has no Handle method, the call will fail at runtime.

The compiler doesn't help (or stop) you with dynamics. Failures are postponed until runtime :)

share|improve this answer
    
Seems similiar to my answer, just that the cast is done in the method argument and that no specialized exception will be thrown for the wrong input type. – H.B. Aug 14 '11 at 19:18
    
Indeed it does. Looks like I didn't read your answer well enough. – Erik A. Brandstadmoen Aug 14 '11 at 19:24

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