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I'm programming a RPG website with Rails 3.1 and I've got a User model (fields don't matter much).

What I need is to be able to marry two users but I don't know what's the best way for the associations.

I've thought of user1 and user2 as columns but I don't know how to say that both are the same when associating it to the User model in order to know whether a User is married or not. (that's to say that a user id can be on one column or the other one...)

Thank you in advance !

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If it's always one to one you could set it up like this:

class User
  belongs_to :partner, :foreign_key => :partner_id, :class_name => 'User', :inverse_of => :partner
end

Which should handle the inverse relationship as well, e.g.

user_1.partner = user_2
user_2.partner # <user_1>

If you need Marriage as a class, the marriage could just relate to users through has_many and validate that the # of users is 2 (if it's a traditional marriage). E.g. if you went the STI route:

class Marriage < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :marriage
end

class TraditionalMarriage < Marriage
  validate do |record|
    if record.users.length != 2
      record.errors.add(:users, "Marriage is between 2 people!!")
    end
  end
end

class PartyTimeMarriage < Marriage
  validate do |record|
    if record.users.length < 3
      record.errors.add(:users, "A good marriage requires at least three spouses!!")
    end
  end
end
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this will work but you'll lose Marriage as an external class. Marriage as an external class will still work if the marriage has_many users but validates that that number is 2. –  numbers1311407 Aug 13 '11 at 21:24
1  
+1 first time I have seen inverse, nice, had to google it - apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Associations/ClassMethods/… –  house9 Aug 13 '11 at 21:25
    
+1. Nice use of STI in your refactor. –  Brandon Tilley Aug 13 '11 at 21:39
    
Okay, I think it's solved. Thank you ! –  Skydreamer Aug 13 '11 at 21:40
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Some form of

has_one :wife, :class_name => "User"
belongs_to :husband, :class_name => "User"

should work in your User active record model. Maybe slap on some validation for genders.

Another solution would be to create a married table with 2 User references (has_one), to hold additional data like marriage date and stuff.

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this is of course assuming that same sex marriage is barred in this fantasy universe –  numbers1311407 Aug 13 '11 at 21:13
    
Yeah I want an external table ;) (In order to hold couples, marriages and so on...) –  Skydreamer Aug 13 '11 at 21:16
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this is untested, but worth experimenting with

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :spouse, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => 'spouse_id' 

    def get_married_to(user)
        self.spouse = user
        user.spouse = self
    end
end

u1 = User.new
u2 = User.new
u1.get_married_to(u2)    

also check out the rails guides: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html

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