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I have a winforms app that installs other apps in a loop. This works properly on an administrator account in Windows 7, but I have serious issues in a standard account - the app requires elevation in order to write to "Program Files(x86)" folder.

Therefore I am trying to ask for elevation for a specific method (the one that runs the installers) in a winforms c# app, using this code:

[System.Security.Permissions.PrincipalPermission(System.Security.Permissions.SecurityAction.Demand, Role = @"BUILTIN\Administrators")]

After receiving an error, I learned from the web that before calling the method which carries the above attribute, I need to write this:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetPrincipalPolicy(PrincipalPolicy.WindowsPrincipal);

I did this, and the method still throws the following error:

Request for principal permission failed.

Step by step debugging passes the SetPrincipalPolicy line but, when it reaches the method with the Demand atribute, it just throws the same error, as if the SetPrincipalPolicy never existed.

Am I doing something wrong in setting the Demand attribute properly?

Thank you in advance.

LATER EDIT: as requested here is the code that is supposed to trigger the elevation request when installing the app silently (but does not work):

 WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent());
        bool hasAdministrativeRight = principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);
        if (!hasAdministrativeRight)
        {
            ProcessStartInfo psi = new ProcessStartInfo(file);
            psi.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
            psi.UseShellExecute = true;
            psi.Verb = "runas";

            //psi.CreateNoWindow = true;
            psi.Arguments = modifiers;
            try
            {
                using (Process process = Process.Start(psi))
                {
                    process.WaitForExit();
                    if (process.HasExited)
                        return process.ExitCode;
                }
            }
            catch (Win32Exception wex)
            {

            }
        }

What I need, is for that process to pop a dialog asking for username and password for admin, if the app was ran under a Windows Standard User. Only the process started programmatically above should run as admin, the main app itself can remain as a standard user.

share|improve this question
    
You need to do something so the user can enter an administrator password. –  MrFox Aug 13 '11 at 21:32
    
Thanks - are you suggesting I should not use the above code at all, with the attribute? Also regarding your comment I have read about the Consent UI which asks for the username and password, but could not find out anywhere how to call that - if you could point me to a link I would much appreciate –  Amc_rtty Aug 13 '11 at 21:52
1  
Should process.HasExited always be true after process.WaitForExit();? –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 14 '11 at 12:12
    
True, I think that is redundant in there. I will remove HasExited. –  Amc_rtty Aug 14 '11 at 12:33
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can either force your app to always run as an admin. This is how you do that. It is not recommended however for your app to need admin privileges to run.

If you start a Process to run the installer, you can check here how to run the process as an admin.

A third option which Visual Studio uses is that when you do something where you need admin privileges you are prompted to restart the app and it then restarts the app as an admin and you can perform the tasks. Just use the code from the second way to start your app.

The method you've posted to run as admin will check if the user is admin and then start the process as an admin. If the user doesn't have admin rights the app won't even start. A better solution is to always try to run the process as an admin. Then the user will get an UAC prompt with password and username, which an admin can fill in.

public static int RunAsAdmin(string fileName)
{

        ProcessStartInfo psi = new ProcessStartInfo(fileName);
        psi.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        psi.UseShellExecute = true;
        psi.Verb = "runas";
        psi.Arguments = modifiers;

        try
        {
            using (Process process = Process.Start(psi))
            {
                process.WaitForExit();
                if (process.HasExited)
                    return process.ExitCode;
            }
        }
        catch (Win32Exception wex)
        {

        }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I start a process to run the installer. I have used ProcessStartInfoVerb = runas, as the link suggests, however with no success - my process still ran as a standard user. Maybe I was doing it wrong - when I use the runas option, do I also have to pop the Consent UI, to ask for the username and password? Thank you –  Amc_rtty Aug 13 '11 at 22:36
    
@Andrei are you using ShellExecute as well? –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 14 '11 at 11:25
    
I am using the attribute UseShellExecute = true as per instructions in the link you have provided (the one with starting a process). –  Amc_rtty Aug 14 '11 at 11:29
    
Please post your code. I threw together a small app and it works just fine... –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 14 '11 at 11:44
1  
Glad to hear that it worked. As for if UAC is turned off or not (might even be an older OS where UAC does not exist), you could just inform the user that he needs to login as an admin –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 14 '11 at 14:58
show 6 more comments

This is just not the way UAC works. It is process based, the user only ever gets the "please let me mess with your machine" prompt when you start a new process. With the proper incantation of "I need the user's consent to mess with the machine, please say Yes" signal embedded in the program. Which you do by this answer.

Death to the idea of making it method based. Unreasonable to a programmer, makes sense to a user. User wins.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your insight. If you are suggesting that I should include a manifest to make the whole app run with admin rights from the start - isn't that unsafe to do? Also could you tell me a reason why I should not do this method based? Please elaborate on how it is unreasonable. –  Amc_rtty Aug 13 '11 at 22:27
1  
@Andrei: He's not saying that you "should not" do it for individual methods, he's saying that you cannot do it for individual methods. User Account Control (or UAC), the mechanism you're trying to outsmart here, is process-based, not method-based. As far as what you should do, you shouldn't be doing this at all. Standard applications never need to write to the system directories; they're protected for a reason. Yes, it's unsafe to grant a process access to these directories. That's why you shouldn't do it unless absolutely required. –  Cody Gray Aug 14 '11 at 12:20
    
Thank you for your comment I understand now. –  Amc_rtty Aug 14 '11 at 12:32
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