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I'm trying to find better methods to handle the events of a polled socket (fd). I'm stuck on this to exploit the poll() function with a different pollfd like this:

#define out std::cout
#define el std::endl
#define line(string) out<<string<<el
class int_t
{
    private:
        int _int;
        int _owner;
    public:
        operator int() const;
        int_t();
        int_t(const int& in);
        int_t& operator=(const int& in);
        int_t operator|(const int& in) const;
        int_t operator&(const int& in) const;
        /*
        ...
        ...
        */
        void setowner(const int& fd);
        ~int_t();
};
int_t::operator int() const
{
    return this->_int;
}
int_t::int_t()
{
    this->_int = 0;
    this->_owner = 0;
}
int_t::int_t(const int& in)
{
    this->_int = in;
    this->_owner = 0;
}
int_t& int_t::operator=(const int& in)
{
    line("operator '=' called"<<" owner:"<<this->_owner);
    this->_int = in;
    return *this;
}
int_t int_t::operator|(const int& in) const
{
    line("operator '|' called"<<" owner:"<<this->_owner);
    return (this->_int|in);
}
int_t int_t::operator&(const int& in) const
{
    line("operator '&' with arg called"<<" owner:"<<this->_owner);
    return (this->_int&in);
}
/*
...
...
*/
void int_t::setowner(const int& fd)
{
    this->_owner = fd;
}
int_t::~int_t()
{
    this->_int = 0;
}
struct pollfd_other
{
    // Valgrind returns me an error when i changing the type of the `revent` only
    // but when i changing the type of the `event` and `revent` works without error
    // and `poll()` gets the flags normally from the `event` if ill put for example
    // a `POLLIN` flag.
    int fd;
    int_t events;
    int_t revents;
    void setowner(const int& pollfdowner){
        this->fd = pollfdowner;
        this->revents.setowner(pollfdowner);
    } 
};
int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    Server server;
    pollfd_other pfd[1];
    pfd[0].setowner(server.socket);
    ::poll(reinterpret_cast<pollfd*>(&pfd),1,-1);
    // ...
}

The class int_t works very well as an integer and struct pollfd_other ... but the poll() doesn't access it like a class to invoke the operators ...
The purpose of this is to create a thread when an operator will be invoked on the revents member of the struct pollfd_other.
There is any other method to do something like this? Suggestions are welcomed ...

share|improve this question
    
I would suggest learning to use boost::asio if you could. It provides a very nice cross-platform interface for this sort of thing. And poll is slow if you have a lot of file descriptors. You want epoll on a Linux platform, kqeue on a BSD platform, and completion ports on Windows. –  Omnifarious Aug 13 '11 at 22:46
    
I've heard about the boost library but to be honest i don't care for the portability. I care only for the footprint, stability and speed at this state. –  memosdp Aug 13 '11 at 23:08
    
If you intend to handle more than a few 10s of connections at a time then poll will serve you poorly from a performance standpoint. –  Omnifarious Aug 14 '11 at 2:17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That looks very convoluted. If you want to encapsulate the poll functionality in an object, don't encapsulate an int, encapsulate the poll. Something like this:

class poller_callback {
    public:
        void handle_pollin(int fd) = 0;
};

class poller {
    public:
        poller(const vector<int>& fds);
        void do_poll(const poller_callback& c)
        {
            // poll(&pfd, ...);
            if(fd[i].revents & POLLIN) {
                c.handle_pollin(fd[i].fd);
            }
        }
};

int main(void)
{
    my_poller_callback my_handler;
    // get fds
    poller my_poller(fds);
    do_poll(my_handler);
    // ...
    return 0;
}

This is how I'd do it. Have a class that encapsulates poll(), which is parameterized on what it should do on events. poller_callback is an interface for objects that handle events. You can then write my_poller_callback which, in its handle_pollin, creates the thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Good method but i don't want to search in the pollfd array for wich of the polled sockets returned an event. I want to let poll() in infite state except when ill accept a new connection to put the 'fd' of the new client in 'pollfd' and then again poll the sockets in infinite state. When a socket event like POLLIN will occur i thought that will invoke the | operator to set the bit and then will invoke the overloaded | operator of the class and then i can handle the request in a new different thread ... for example to read the data. –  memosdp Aug 13 '11 at 22:23
    
Well, even if you want to start the thread in the operator|(), you'll still have to go through the fds in the pollfd array - I don't think there's a way around it. And that's why handling the events in operator|() isn't really a very transparent way to do it, you could just as well call the member function check_for_events() and call that instead of the operator. –  Antti Aug 13 '11 at 22:36
    
I made some more changes in the code ... to show you how can i handle each client without go through the fds to check for events. Anyway ... it doesn't work that way because poll() doesn't handle the 'int_t' like class to invoke the operators or maybe somewhere else is the problem in this code ... –  memosdp Aug 14 '11 at 0:23
    
Yes, you always have to pass a pollfd array to poll(). And the implementation in poll() is in C and lives in the kernel space, you can't create a callback from kernel space to user space using operator overloading. Very creative, though. –  Antti Aug 14 '11 at 8:50
    
Thanks. Yes right ... i thought about this before create the class int_t for that the poll() is kernel space operation and because of this i wrote on the title '(user-space)' and i didn't try to call poll() without a pollfd array but to exploid the poll() somehow and i started from the pollfd struct. –  memosdp Aug 14 '11 at 17:54
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On Linux I recommend epoll (http://kovyrin.net/2006/04/13/epoll-asynchronous-network-programming/, manual pages). It's much faster then poll/select and easier to use becasue you can asign pointer for each handled descriptor.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean "you can assign pointer for each handled descriptor"? –  memosdp Aug 13 '11 at 22:55
    
you can store arbitrary associated value to the polled file descriptors. it's up to you how you handle it. so yes, you can put a pointer there, cast it to some base-class pointer and call the event-handler on it. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 13 '11 at 23:12
    
Interesting ... thanks. –  memosdp Aug 13 '11 at 23:16
    
Like yi_H said, for more examples search stackoverflow because epoll was already mentioned and explained in few questions. –  Goofy Aug 14 '11 at 9:08
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