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I am using Ninject and the MVC3 extension installed with nuget. My kernel setup code is in the App_Start/NinjectMVC3.cs file. Everything works great in controllers, but I can't figure out how to (properly) bind interfaces in the Global.asax.cs MvcApplication code.

I ended up using a hack (creating a public NinjectMVC3.GetKernel() method that returns bootstrap.kernel). However, that will be deprecated, and there must be a proper way to do this that I am not seeing.

Here is my code:

public class LogFilterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private IReportingService ReportingService { get; set; }
    public LogFilterAttribute( IReportingService reportingService )
    {
        this.ReportingService  = reportingService;
    }
    ...
}

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    public static void RegisterGlobalFilters( GlobalFilterCollection filters )
    {
        filters.Add( new HandleErrorAttribute() );
        filters.Add( new LogFilterAttribute()  );
    }
    ...
    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        ...
        RegisterGlobalFilters( GlobalFilters.Filters );
        // NOTE hack:
        var kernel = NinjectMVC3.GetKernel();
        var logger = kernel.Get<ILogger>();
        var bw = new BackgroundWork(logger);
        Application["BackgroundWork"] = bw;
        bw.Start();
    }
}

There are two interfaces I am interested in. The first is just binding an object to a Global variable (the ILogger for the BackgroundWork).

And the second is for an ActionFilter. I read http://www.planetgeek.ch/2010/11/13/official-ninject-mvc-extension-gets-support-for-mvc3/, but I don't see how it plugs into the actual registration (filter.Add).

I don't want to use the Property Inject if I can avoid it.

Any thoughts on the proper way to do this? Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

MVC 3 introduces the DependencyResolver which is populated into a singleton, and the Ninject extension supports it. You could use that in your MvcApplication class if you need it:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    // ...
    var logger = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<ILogger>();
}

Now I should point out that it is unnecessary to do this with action filters. In Ninject.MVC3 you are supposed to use the BindFilter syntax, like so:

// Declare empty attribute
public class MyFilterAttribute : FilterAttribute { }

// Dependency module
public class MyModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        // Other bindings
        // ...
        this.BindFilter<MyActionFilter>(FilterScope.Action, 1)
            .WhenControllerHas<MyFilterAttribute>();
    }
}

Note that you have to use this because BindFilter is an extension method, and you also have to reference the Ninject.Web.Mvc.FilterBindingSyntax namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the BindFilter, I am assuming we use that INSTEAD of the filters.add? So I can remove the code in RegisterGlobalFilters? However, now there would be two places to check to see which filter is being used? Maybe I am missing something. Should I keep the filter registration and have a default constructor? –  teleball Aug 15 '11 at 14:26
    
Regarding the DependencyResolver, isn't that an AntiPattern (stackoverflow.com/questions/5653783/…) and the reason why the current hack is being removed? –  teleball Aug 15 '11 at 14:27
    
@user: RegisterGlobalFilters is for filters that execute on every action in every controller. The BindFilter syntax registers a filter to be used when a specific Attribute is found on a controller or action; in this example, it will cause MyFilter to be run whenever MyFilterAttribute is found. –  Aaronaught Aug 15 '11 at 14:50
2  
@user: And yes, the DependencyResolver is just a not-so-cleverly-disguised service locator, but in this case you don't have any other choice because Ninject does not create your MvcApplication and therefore cannot do any dependency injection on it. The application itself is a Singleton object, so there's really no inconsistency with using the singleton Service Locator. If you were referencing DependencyResolver.Current in your Controllers, I would be worried, but in the MvcApplication class... meh, doesn't really matter. –  Aaronaught Aug 15 '11 at 14:53

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