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Hypothetically speaking, if my scientific work was leading toward the development of functions/modules/subroutines (on a desktop), what would I need to know to incorporate it into a large-scale simulation to be run on a supercomputer (which might simulate molecules, fluids, reactions, and so on)?

My impression is that it has to do with taking advantage of certain libraries (e.g., BLAS, LAPLACK) where possible, revising algorithms (reducing iteration), profiling, parallelizing, considering memory-hard disk-processor use/access... I am aware of the adage, "want to optimize your code? don't do it", but if one were interested in learning about writing efficient code, what references might be available?

I think this question is language agnostic, but since many number-crunching packages for biomolecular simulation, climate modeling, etc. are written in some version of Fortran, this language would probably be my target of interest (and I have programmed rather extensively in Fortran 77).

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I recommend removing [fortran] as a tag, and instead add [hpc]. Or consider dropping [memory], and keep [fortran]. Fortran underpins so much stuff that you may not really need to learn it, as the libraries you use may already be written in it, and your first learning tasks are to learn how to use the libraries, hardware, grid infrastructure, and so on. –  Iterator Aug 13 '11 at 23:26
    
@Iterator - Yes, although the author mentions fortran in his question, this question is really not about the fortran language. –  Rook Aug 14 '11 at 0:22
    
@Rook: Sorry I goofed: I tried to add [hpc] as a tag, but it seems that only 5 tags are allowed. That's why I made the suggestion above, but I didn't mention the constraint that motivated the suggestion. –  Iterator Aug 14 '11 at 0:38
    
Thanks for this. –  crippledlambda Aug 14 '11 at 0:58
    
@Iterator - No goof ... It was a good suggestion. –  Rook Aug 15 '11 at 17:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Profiling is a must at any level of machinery. In common usage, I've found that scaling to larger and larger grids requires a better understanding of the grid software and the topology of the grid. In that sense, everything you learn about optimizing for one machine is still applicable, but understanding the grid software gets you additional mileage. Hadoop is one of the most popular and widespread grid systems, so learning about the scheduler options, interfaces (APIs and web interfaces), and other aspects of usage will help. Although you may not use Hadoop for a given supercomputer, it is one of the less painful methods for learning about distributed computing. For parallel computing, you may pursue MPI and other systems.

Additionally, learning to parallelize code on a single machine, across multiple cores or processors, is something you can begin learning on a desktop machine.

Recommendations:

  1. Learn to optimize code on a single machine:
    • Learn profiling
    • Learn to use optimized libraries (after profiling: so that you see the speedup)
    • Be sure you know algorithms and data structures very well (*)
  2. Learn to do embarrassingly parallel programming on multiple core machines.
    • Later: consider multithreaded programming. It's harder and may not pay off for your problem.
  3. Learn about basic grid software for distributed processing
  4. Learn about tools for parallel processing on a grid
  5. Learn to program for alternative hardware, e.g. GPUs, various specialized computing systems.

This is language agnostic. I have had to learn the same sequence in multiple languages and multiple HPC systems. At each step, take a simpler route to learn some of the infrastructure and tools; e.g. learn multicore before multithreaded, distributed before parallel, so that you can see what fits for the hardware and problem, and what doesn't.

Some of the steps may be reordered depending on local computing practices, established codebases, and mentors. If you have a large GPU or MPI library in place, then, by all means, learn that rather than foist Hadoop onto your collaborators.

(*) The reason to know algorithms very well is that as soon as your code is running on a grid, others will see it. When it is hogging up the system, they will want to know what you're doing. If you are running a process that is polynomial and should be constant, you may find yourself mocked. Others with more domain expertise may help you find good approximations for NP-hard problems, but you should know that the concept exists.

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Thanks for the step-by-step. –  crippledlambda Aug 15 '11 at 15:45

Parallelization would be the key.

Since the problems you cited (e.g. CFD, multiphysics, mass transfer) are generally expressed as large-scale linear algebra problems, you need matrix routines that parallelize well. MPI is a standard for those types of problems.

Physics can influence as well. For example, it's possible to solve some elliptical problems efficiently using explicit dynamics and artificial mass and damping matricies.

3D multiphysics means coupled differential equations with varying time scales. You'll want a fine mesh to resolve details in both space and time, so the number of degrees of freedom will rise rapidly; time steps will be governed by the stability requirements of your problem.

If someone ever figures out how to run linear algebra as a map-reduce problem they'll have it knocked.

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I do linear algebra on Hadoop on a regular basis, albeit with a more modern twist. It's one of my research areas, and I agree - developing it as a map-reduce problem involves novel code. –  Iterator Aug 13 '11 at 23:36
    
I'd love to see how you're approaching it. My understanding is that linear algebra is Hadoop-proof, because LU decomposition by rows can't be independent. –  duffymo Aug 14 '11 at 1:52
    
That's the modern twist & that's why it's research. :) –  Iterator Aug 14 '11 at 2:46

Hypothetically speaking, if my scientific work was leading toward the development of functions/modules/subroutines (on a desktop), what would I need to know to incorporate it into a large-scale simulation to be run on a supercomputer (which might simulate molecules, fluids, reactions, and so on)?

First, you would need to understand the problem. Not all problems can be solved in parallel (and I'm using the term parallel in as wide meaning as it can get). So, see how the problem is now solved. Can it be solved with some other method quicker. Can it be divided in independent parts ... and so on ...

Fortran is the language specialized for scientific computing, and during the recent years, along with the development of new language features, there has also been some very interesting development in terms of features that are aiming for this "market". The term "co-arrays" could be an interesting read.

But for now, I would suggest reading first into a book like Using OpenMP - OpenMP is a simpler model but the book (fortran examples inside) explains nicely the fundamentals. Message parsing interface (for friends, MPI :) is a larger model, and one of often used. Your next step from OpenMP should probably go in this direction. Books on the MPI programming are not rare.

You mentioned also libraries - yes, some of those you mentioned are widely used. Others are also available. A person who does not know exactly where the problem in performance lies should IMHO never try to undertake the task of trying to rewrite library routines.

Also there are books on parallel algorithms, you might want to check out.

I think this question is language agnostic, but since many number-crunching packages for biomolecular simulation, climate modeling, etc. are written in some version of Fortran, this language would probably be my target of interest (and I have programmed rather extensively in Fortran 77).

In short it comes down to understanding the problem, learning where the problem in performance is, re-solving the whole problem again with a different approach, iterating a few times, and by that time you'll already know what you're doing and where you're stuck.

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Thanks for the book reference -- I will begin with this. –  crippledlambda Aug 15 '11 at 15:45
    
@crippledlambda - Glad to help... –  Rook Aug 15 '11 at 17:09

We're in a position similar to yours. I'm most in agreement with @Iterator's answer, but I think there's more to say.

First of all, I believe in "profiling" by the random-pausing method, because I'm not really interested in measuring things (It's easy enough to do that) but in pinpointing code that is causing time waste, so I can fix it. It's like the difference between a floodlight and a laser.

For one example, we use LAPACK and BLAS. Now, in taking my stack samples, I saw a lot of the samples were in the routine that compares characters. This was called from a general routine that multiplies and scales matrices, and that was called from our code. The matrix-manipulating routine, in order to be flexible, has character arguments that tell it things like, if a matrix is lower-triangular or whatever. In fact, if the matrices are not very large, the routine can spend more than 50% of its time just classifying the problem. Of course, the next time it is called from the same place, it does the same thing all over again. In a case like that, a special routine should be written. When it is optimized by the compiler, it will be as fast as it reasonably can be, and will save all that classifying time.

For another example, we use a variety of ODE solvers. These are optimized to the nth degree of course. They work by calling user-provided routines to calculate derivatives and possibly a jacobian matrix. If those user-provided routines don't actually do much, samples will indeed show the program counter in the ODE solver itself. However, if the user-provided routines do much more, samples will find the lower end of the stack in those routines mostly, because they take longer, while the ODE code takes roughly the same time. So, optimization should be concentrated in the user-provided routines, not the ODE code.

Once you've done several of the kind of optimization that is pinpointed by stack sampling, which can speed things up by 1-2 orders of magnitude, then by all means exploit parallelism, MPI, etc. if the problem allows it.

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+1 Good points. Random sampling & counting calls to functions has been very helpful to me. I'll never forget the joy of profiling a bit of code and discovering that it was behaving quadratically relative to # of points, when it should be linear. One little rewrite and I could scale dramatically. One can & should discover such implementation gotchas on a desktop; wasting HPC time to discover it is always more embarrassing. –  Iterator Aug 14 '11 at 19:25

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