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I want to construct an object of class T by using ::operator new(size_t) and placement new.

To "extend" the size of char v[1], which is the last declared data member in T, I allocate sizeof(T) + n - 1 bytes with operator new(), where n is the wanted size in bytes. This trick allows me to access v[i] for any i in [0, n -1].

My questions are about the C++ standard:

  1. Does the order of declaration of data members in T reflect the order in which data is represented in memory?

  2. If the order is preserved, are data member alignments also preserved no matter how bigger is the size of the allocated memory?

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4  
This is going to be UB, no doubt about it. Why not create an array of the proper size? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:59

4 Answers 4

1) Yes. From the section on pointer comparisons, the standard states that pointers to later members must compare as greater than pointers to earlier members. Edit: As pointed out by Martin, the standard only mandates this for POD structs.

2) Yes. Data alignment is not affected by the size of the allocation.

The thing is, nothing in the standard actually guarantees that the trick of using arrays this way works (IIRC).

struct something {
    ...
    char buf[1];
};

However, this is done so commonly that it is a de-facto standard. The standards folks, last time I checked, were working on a way that they could codify these existing practices (It's already made its way into the C standard and it's only a matter of time before it's standardized in C++).

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This question is about C++, not C. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:58
    
1) Is true for C. But not true for class objects unless they conform to 'A-Standard Layout class'. See section 9 (paragraph 7) of n3242. –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 1:32
    
@Tomalak: The mention of C was parenthetical. –  Dietrich Epp Aug 14 '11 at 1:47
    
@Dietrich: OK; didn't find that clear at the time. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 2:08

1a: Yes, just like C, the order of data members define the order in memory.

1b: Not unless the class is a POD (plain-old-data) class. To get that, it must not have constructors or virtual functions. The C++ standard has a list of rules that define what qualifies as POD.

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1  
FYI: A POD-struct is an aggregate class (see below) that has no non-static data members of type non-POD-struct, non-POD-union (or array of such types) or reference, and has no user-declared copy assignment operator and no user-declared destructor. // An aggregate is an array or a class with no user-declared constructors, no private or protected non-static data members, no base classes, and no virtual functions. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:58
    
1a) For C like structures yes. For C++ limited yes. –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 1:33

You can influence the alignment in memory with the pragma pack declarations, just Google for it.

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3  
These have nothing to do with standard C++, and "just Google for it" is not an answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:59
    
Just offering some useful information ;) –  the_source Aug 14 '11 at 1:00
1  
Perhaps better off in a comment :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:02
    
You are correct, I'll do that next time! –  the_source Aug 14 '11 at 1:04
    
Excellent! Fun times! :D –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:07

Does the order of declaration of data members in T reflect the order in which data is represented in memory?

In limited situations yes.
See Section 9 Classes [class] paragraph 7 (Look for details about A standard-layout class)

But in general no. There are no guarantees about the order of members in different protected/private/public regions.

If the order is preserved, are data member alignments also preserved no matter how bigger is the size of the allocated memory?

What do you mean preserved. The compiler decides for you. Once they are defined for a class they are constant through the code.

I want to construct an object of class T by using ::operator new(size_t) and placement new.

This is guaranteed. As long as you use new to allocate a block of memory at lease the same size as T then it is guaranteed to be aligned correctly for objects of type T.

3.1.1 Alignment [basic.align]

Paragraph 5:

Alignments have an order from weaker to stronger or stricter alignments. Stricter alignments have larger alignment values. An address that satisfies an alignment requirement also satisfies any weaker valid alignment requirement.

Thus if you have an object that is aligned to stricter requirement it is guaranteed to be aligned for weaker alignments. Thus space aligned for something that that is larger than T is also aligned for objects of size T.

5.3.4 New [expr.new]

Paragraph 10

A new-expression passes the amount of space requested to the allocation function as the first argument of type std::size_t. That argument shall be no less than the size of the object being created; it may be greater than the size of the object being created only if the object is an array. For arrays of char and unsigned char, the difference between the result of the new-expression and the address returned by the allocation function shall be an integral multiple of the strictest fundamental alignment requirement (3.11) of any object type whose size is no greater than the size of the array being created. [ Note: Because allocation functions are assumed to return pointers to storage that is appropriately aligned for objects of any type with fundamental alignment, this constraint on array allocation overhead permits the common idiom of allocating character arrays into which objects of other types will later be placed. — end note ]

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"There are no guarantees about the order of members in different protected/private/public regions".... How can this be? By not guaranteeing an order it's impossible guarantee binary compatibility not only between different compilers, but also different builds! I'm not saying you're wrong but it's very hard to believe. –  James Aug 14 '11 at 1:35
    
@James: There is no binary compatibility between different compilers (or even different optimization levels of the same compiler in some cases). You can get binary compatibility of an class layout by making sure it is standard-layout class this has very strict requirements. This is why build systems build debug/release binaries into different directories because you are not supposed to mix and match with some compilers (though some compilers do allow it). –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 1:39
    
I have read your quote from the standard 5.3.4. I also have a book here which states the following: "Note that one should not use the expression new char[sizeof (T)+n-1]" to allocate raw memory because that memory may not satisfy the alignment requirements of a T, while an explicit call of the global operator new is guaranteed to yield storage that is sufficiently aligned for any C++ object." . The book suggest to use the global ::operator new instead. To me it seems the above contradicts 5.3.4. Or I miss something. –  pipex Aug 14 '11 at 2:11
    
It does contradict the above. So I suggest your book is wrong. The standard is the benchmark. Is your book about C, I don't think the above was guaranteed for C malloc/free and thus you see a lot of manually alignment by C programmers. –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 16:14

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