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So I have a string like this

string = "<user>username 1<notes>Notes of User 1</notes></user> <user>username 2<notes>Notes of User 2</notes></user>"

How could I parse the string in Javascript or JQuery to pull out the "Notes" of either user 1 or user 2.

So I'll have a variable like this:

variable = user;

printout notes of user.
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What is this? XML? –  Delan Azabani Aug 14 '11 at 0:41
    
FWIW, that looks a whole heck of a lot like XML. –  Jordan Aug 14 '11 at 0:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

to identify the notes of user1 or user2 you need to change your xml a bit

string = "<user>username 1<notes id='user1'>Notes of User 1</notes></user> <user>username 2<notes>Notes of User 2</notes></user>"

notice that i added id=user1

alert($(string).find("notes[id='user1']").text());

here is the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/Qa5sP/


EDIT after the -1 :(

No, jQuery selectors do not parse XML. This may appear to work at times, but it's invalid and browser-dependent.

So, here is the parseXML way:

 xmlDoc = $.parseXML(string),
    $xml = $(xmlDoc),
    $title = $xml.find("notes[id='user1']").text();

alert($title); 

Live demo.

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No, jQuery selectors do not parse XML. This may appear to work at times, but it's invalid and browser-dependent. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:52
    
hows id='user1' relevant here? –  naveen Aug 14 '11 at 1:14
    
@john: Downvote removed thanks to your edit. Good job :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:23
    
That seems like an easy way to do it, I'm wondering if there's a way to do it without adding an extra id tag to each of the notes, or possibly via class names, the reason why is because each note could be associated with multiple users. e.g. A note could be associated with users 1, 2, and 3 –  Talon Aug 14 '11 at 6:55

You mean an XML like string, not a HTML like string. jQuery has a lovely XML parser for that http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.parseXML/

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+1: This is the correct answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:52
3  
I enjoy the thumbs down, but note that standard HTML parsers can parse the string listed above. The issue hasn't been fully sussed out to say this is the only correct answer. –  ghayes Aug 14 '11 at 1:01
1  
You're absolutely correct. However I think it's obvious that this is XML and therefore an appropriate parser should be used. The latest HTML5 spec doesn't specify tags of user or notes. I also wouldn't encourage the concept of HTML instead of XML, when modeling data. –  sciritai Aug 14 '11 at 1:08
    
Absolutely. This is very clearly not HTML. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:23
1  
@ghayes: "standard HTML parsers can parse the string listed above". Actually, any ability to parse that string is explicitly and inherently non -standard. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:25

Here's a JSFiddle. It's simple to do using jQuery if you are using HTML-parsible XML (as seen above).

 string = "<user>username 1<notes>Notes of User 1</notes></user> <user>username 2<notes>Notes of User 2</notes></user>";
 var node = $("<div>" + string + "</div>");

 alert(node.find('notes').text());
 node.attachTo(document.body); //append to dom?
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that is going to fetch notes of both the users –  John x Aug 14 '11 at 0:51
    
jQuery $() does not parse XML. This may appear to work at times, but it's not valid. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 0:52
    
Are we sure this is XML? Your presumption is nice, but not entirely consistent with the facts given. –  ghayes Aug 14 '11 at 1:03
    
+1 ghayes @Tomalak Geret'kal: i think you are a little unfair. here ghayes is trying to make the string a part of html of a non existent div and as $ will parse DOM, he could then parse it. also curious to see how this could be solved using $.parseXML –  naveen Aug 14 '11 at 1:21
    
@naveen: I'm not being "unfair" at all. As I said, jQuery $() parses HTML, not XML. Last I checked, <user> and <notes> are not valid HTML tags. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 1:22

I would rather go with this approach.

var xml = "<user>username 1<notes>Notes of User 1</notes></user> <user>username 2<notes>Notes of User 2</notes></user>";

function FindNotesByUserName(uName) {
    var node = $('<div/>').html(xml);
    return node.find(":contains('" + uName + "')").closest("user").find("notes").text();
}

var desiredNotes = FindNotesByUserName("username 2");

N.B: This is a minor alteration of what ghayes did. Just to meet OP requirement.

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