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Is there any way to validate datetime field before inserting it into appropriate table?

Trying to insert with try/catch block is not a way.

Thanks,

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How are you inserting the data? ALso, what type of validation are you talking about? Within a certain range or that its a valid format? –  iamkrillin Aug 14 '11 at 3:25
    
well, there are so many different ways we would really need more detail: are you talking about validating it upon input from the user? (in other words not accepting at all if it's in a incorrect format) or validating within code? or SQL? what action do you propose be taken if it's invalid? is it in a transaction that would need to be rolled back? what is the reason behind why a try/catch insert, does that help us understand what you are looking for? –  shelleybutterfly Aug 14 '11 at 3:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Not sure if I'm being overly pedantic there, but DateTime.TryParse will validate whether a value is a valid DateTime object. OP asked about verifying a value before inserting into SQL Server datetime. The range of acceptable values for a SQL Server datetime is "January 1, 1753, through December 31, 9999" That does not hold true for DateTime .NET objects. This script assigns a value of "1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM" to badDateTime and it successfully parses.

DateTime d = DateTime.MinValue;
string badDateTime = DateTime.MinValue.ToString();
Console.WriteLine(badDateTime);
DateTime.TryParse(badDateTime, out d);

However, if you attempted to store that into a datetime field, it would fail with "The conversion of a varchar data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range value."

    /// <summary>
    /// An initial pass at a method to verify whether a value is 
    /// kosher for SQL Server datetime
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="someval">A date string that may parse</param>
    /// <returns>true if the parameter is valid for SQL Sever datetime</returns>
    static bool IsValidSqlDatetime(string someval)
    {
        bool valid = false;
        DateTime testDate = DateTime.MinValue;
        DateTime minDateTime = DateTime.MaxValue;
        DateTime maxDateTime = DateTime.MinValue;

        minDateTime = new DateTime(1753, 1, 1);
        maxDateTime = new DateTime(9999, 12, 31, 23, 59, 59, 997);

        if (DateTime.TryParse(someval, out testDate))
        {
            if (testDate >= minDateTime && testDate <= maxDateTime)
            {
                valid = true;
            }
        }

        return valid;
    }

This is probably a better approach as this will attempt to cast the DateTime object into an actual sql datetime data type


    /// <summary>
    /// An better method to verify whether a value is 
    /// kosher for SQL Server datetime. This uses the native library
    /// for checking range values
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="someval">A date string that may parse</param>
    /// <returns>true if the parameter is valid for SQL Sever datetime</returns>
    static bool IsValidSqlDateTimeNative(string someval)
    {
        bool valid = false;
        DateTime testDate = DateTime.MinValue;
        System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime sdt;
        if (DateTime.TryParse(someval, out testDate))
        {
            try
            {
                // take advantage of the native conversion
                sdt = new System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime(testDate);
                valid = true;
            }
            catch (System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlTypeException ex)
            {

                // no need to do anything, this is the expected out of range error
            }
        }

        return valid;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're right. I'm looking for a solution to make sure the string I have as DateTime now will be insterted into Datetime field in table without any error. –  MichaelVerossa Aug 14 '11 at 4:03
    
Edited to add a simple method that will check the values are in range. Going to try a second approach, might be less error prone –  billinkc Aug 14 '11 at 4:12
    
I'll try your method! Thank you, billinkc! –  MichaelVerossa Aug 14 '11 at 4:33

If you are mentioning about server side validation of your DateTime field, use DateTime.TryParse. A quick and dirty example will be

DateTime dateValue;
string dateString = "05/01/2009 14:57:32.8";
if (DateTime.TryParse(dateString, out dateValue))
{
    // valid date comes here.
    // use dateValue for this
}
else
{
    // valid date comes here
}
share|improve this answer

DateTime.TryParse is the best validator

DateTime temp;
if(DateTime.TryParse(txtDate.Text, out temp))
//Works
else
// Doesnt work
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not in this case. Every SQLDatetime is a valid .NET datetime but not the other way around. –  bjoern Mar 7 '13 at 19:43

You can use SqlCommand with Parametter to prevent SQLInjection

For examplae:

SqlCommand cmn = new SqlCommand("UPDATE table SET date = @Date ");
// cmn set Here....
cmn.Parameters.Add("@Date",SqlDbType.DateTime).Value = dateTimeObj;

And other(s), you can view in MSDN

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Could you provide a bt more information on where the datetime value is coming from; a web form? You could simply add a CompareValidator as follows

<asp:CompareValidator ID="CompareValidator1" runat="server" 
            ControlToValidate="txtDate" 
            Type="Date" 
            ErrorMessage="CompareValidator">
</asp:CompareValidator>
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<asp:CompareValidator ID="CompareValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtDate" Type="Date" ErrorMessage="CompareValidator"></asp:CompareValidator> –  Obi Onuorah Aug 14 '11 at 3:35
    
stackoverflow.com/editing-help –  naveen Aug 14 '11 at 3:54
1  
Thanks Naveen, was proving a bit of a headache :) –  Obi Onuorah Aug 14 '11 at 5:48

This is another take on billinkc's answer. However, in this method the .Value property of the min/max is used to avoid parsing and try/catch. Someone mentioned they wanted to ensure they are inserting a valid date into SQL Server. So, I took the approach of returning a date that is valid for SQL Server. This could easily be changed to a boolean method that checks to see if the dateToVerify is a valid SQL Server date.

protected DateTime EnsureValidDatabaseDate(DateTime dateToVerify)
{
    if (dateToVerify < System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime.MinValue.**Value**)
    {
        return System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime.MinValue.Value;
    }
    else if (dateToVerify > System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime.MaxValue.**Value**)
    {
        return System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDateTime.MaxValue.Value;
    }
    else
    {
        return dateToVerify;
    }
}
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