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I'm back again ... already.

As the second part to my program, I need to be able to pause my program at random intervals - for example, 10 minutes into the program it gets paused for 20 seconds, 47 minutes in it gets paused for 3 minutes 49 milliseconds ... something like that. I'm not going to attempt a shot at this yet as all the stuff I've found seems to be way too complicated for my tiny little brain to understand, so if someone could break it down for me, that would be great.

Below is my code, I need to pause the bit in the for loop. Thanks! Also, I do know that I've got it clicking, sleeping, clicking, sleeping and then repeating the loop - I want it like that :)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Threading;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace MagicMouse
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        //all this stuff has to do with being able to actually click a mouse
        //[DllImport("user32.dll",CharSet=CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]
        //public static extern void mouse_event(long dwFlags, long dx, long dy, long cButtons, long dwExtraInfo);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        public static extern void mouse_event(int dwFlags, int dx, int dy, int dwData, int dwExtraInfo);
        private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN = 0x02;
        private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP = 0x04;
        private const int MOUSEEVENTF_RIGHTDOWN = 0x08;
        private const int MOUSEEVENTF_RIGHTUP = 0x10;

        //this function will click the mouse using the parameters assigned to it
        public void DoMouseClickLeft()
        {
            //Call the imported function with the cursor's current position
            int X = Cursor.Position.X;
            int Y = Cursor.Position.Y;
            mouse_event(MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN | MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP, X, Y, 0, 0);
        }

        public void NumberCheck(string ValidateNum)
        {
            long CanConvertOut = 0;
            bool CanConvertBool = long.TryParse(ValidateNum, out CanConvertOut);
            if (CanConvertBool == false)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Please enter a valid number.");
                return;
            }
        }

        //this generates the random number used for sleep timer
        private int RandomNumber(int min, int max)
        {
            Random random = new Random();
            return random.Next(min, max);
        }

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }

        //button 1 is start clicking
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //this section sends data to the number validation function
            string ValidateNum = NumberOfItems.Text;
            NumberCheck(ValidateNum);
            int Clicks = Convert.ToInt16(NumberOfItems.Text);

            for (int i = 1; i < Clicks; i++)
            {
                int SleepTime1 = RandomNumber(819, 1092);
                DoMouseClickLeft();
                Thread.Sleep(SleepTime1);
                DoMouseClickLeft();
                Thread.Sleep(SleepTime1);
            }
        }

        //button 2 is exit
        private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Application.Exit();

        }


    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I might have messed up the code a little when I was deleting certain messageboxes and what not, but it should only be a semicolon missing :) :P –  Holyhades666 Aug 14 '11 at 6:02
    
Do you really want to block the whole UI while the application is paused? The user won't be able to do anything with it - clicking on Close won't work, moving it won't work etc. It's generally better to disable any active controls (etc) but keep the UI thread itself working. –  Jon Skeet Aug 14 '11 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

private DateTime GetNextSleep()
{
    // Between 3 and 20 minutes, adjust as needed.
    return DateTime.Now + new TimeSpan(0, 0,
        RandomNumber(60 * 3, 60 * 20));
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //this section sends data to the number validation function
    string ValidateNum = NumberOfItems.Text;
    NumberCheck(ValidateNum);
    int Clicks = Convert.ToInt16(NumberOfItems.Text);

    DateTime nextSleep = GetNextSleep();

    for (int i = 1; i < Clicks; i++)
    {
        int SleepTime1 = RandomNumber(819, 1092);
        DoMouseClickLeft();
        Thread.Sleep(SleepTime1);
        DoMouseClickLeft();
        Thread.Sleep(SleepTime1);

        if (DateTime.Now >= nextSleep)
        {
            // Sleep between 1 and 5 minutes, adjust as needed.
            Thread.Sleep(new TimeSpan(0, 0,
                RandomNumber(60 * 1, 60 * 5)));

            nextSleep = GetNextSleep();
        }
    }
}

Basically, you pre-compute the time you want to pause. Once that time arrives, you sleep for a random amount of time, compute the next sleep time, and return to the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi cdhowie, this seems like a good solution, however, one noob thought comes to mind. Last time I played with time (ha ha), putting a function that got the time in a loop considerably slowed down my program. Does this work in a different way, or will I experience the same type of lag? –  Holyhades666 Aug 14 '11 at 6:15
    
Yes, the DateTime.Now accessor is a relatively expensive call. You might consider adjusting the random bounds of your your SleepTime1 variable to compensate, if this is important. From the looks of it you're not going for very specific timing, so I'm not sure how much this will affect your code. A workaround would be to check the time every N iterations (check if i % N == 0), which will reduce the number of DateTime.Now calls. Pick an N that suitably improves performance without losing too much precision on sleep timing. –  cdhowie Aug 14 '11 at 6:19
    
Would it instead be possible to just pause the program after "N" iterations for a random time? I don't think this would require the datetime.now accessor, as it would instead be accomplished by using the tread.sleep() thing. In essence, each iteration is doing its own timing, as each iteration should last approximately 2 seconds, in the long run. –  Holyhades666 Aug 14 '11 at 6:24
    
If you want to use that approach you can certainly do that. Note that Thread.Sleep() is not a precise mechanism, so factors external to your program (CPU load, for example) can dramatically affect the amount of time your program spends sleeping. Generally-speaking, the shorter the requested sleep duration, the less accurate (proportionally speaking) the sleep timer will be. And you are using quite short sleep durations. So if accurately timing the thread suspension is critical, "sleep every N iterations" won't work. If you're going for "in the ballpark" then it will work fine. –  cdhowie Aug 14 '11 at 6:31
    
Thanks for all your help cdhowie, I'm working on that now and I should have the entire thing up and running within minutes. Thank you once again, and yes, I'm just looking for a general in the ballpark sleep time both during the for loop and during the larger span sleep. :) –  Holyhades666 Aug 14 '11 at 6:39
        using (var taskHandle = new ManualResetEvent(false))
        {
            taskHandle.WaitOne(wait * 1000);
        }

Is a better approach than Thread.Sleep(wait * 1000);

share|improve this answer

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