Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

dynamic_cast throws bad_cast exception if you cast a reference but as I know in the standard pointers are considered as references, i.e. a pointer is a type of a reference.
So should I get bad_cast when casting pointers?

This question arose from the try-catch block from this page. Is this try-catch block inappropriate?

share|improve this question
2  
where did you find that "a pointer is a type of a reference."? –  Aditya Kumar Aug 14 '11 at 8:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No with pointers in case of a bad cast, dynamic_cast will return a null.
Also, dynamic_cast works only on Polymorphic classes, So if you are talking about built in data types(from the link in your question) then static_cast is what you should be using.

And btw, References are NOT pointers.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't say references are pointer, I say pointers are a type of a reference. That are really different thigs! –  Narek Aug 14 '11 at 7:21
1  
No pointers are not a type of Reference, They are both different things –  Alok Save Aug 14 '11 at 7:22
2  
@Narek: in C++ terminology, "reference" is used for, well, references. I agree that it's a VERY awkward terminology. But to avoid misunderstandings, we need to very carefully keep tongue straight (or whatever the idiomatic expression is in English!). :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 14 '11 at 7:23
    
If it does not throw during pointer conversion then why there is a try-cats block in the link? Is it inappropriate? –  Narek Aug 14 '11 at 7:31
1  
@Narek: If you notice, the code in the link checks for null after every dynamic_cast. The try-catch there would catch the bad_alloc exception thrown from new but that try-catch is ill placed to do even that. So Yes that is an bad example. –  Alok Save Aug 14 '11 at 7:35

Regarding the original question "So should I get bad_cast when casting pointers?", No.

That's why you can see constructions like

if( T* pT = dynamic_cast<T*>( p ) ) ...  // use pT in if body

Regarding the new question "Is this try-catch block inappropriate?", no, it is a try-catch block to catch allocation errors; it's not related to the dynamic_cast as such.

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer

Since dynamic_cast<T*> does not throw exceptions, one of the try-catch blocks are completely unnecessary.

However you can easily define your own cast function that does indeed throw exception for pointers. That is what I am doing in my own code (simplified code, and mind you I use garbage collection so I can throw pointers without consequence):

template <class Class, class Object>
inline Class* cast (Object* obj)
{
    Class* result = dynamic_cast<Class*>(obj);
    if( obj != null and result == null ){
        throw new ClassCastException(); //  unusual, throw bad_cast if you prefer
    }
    return result;
}

template <class Class, class Object>
inline const Class* cast (const Object* obj)
{
    const Class* result = dynamic_cast<const Class*>(obj);
    if( obj != null and result == null ){
        throw new ClassCastException(); //  unusual, throw bad_cast if you prefer
    }
    return result;
}

On a side note, I also use it as a syntactic sugar for static_cast, but this is only possible because I do not use it to dynamic_cast references and const references:

template <class Class, class Object>
inline Class cast (const Object& obj)
{
    return static_cast<Class>(obj);
}

I'd say you are better off implementing your own casting function that is coherent in terms of exception handling and do precisely what you want and expect. I did and never looked back.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice but I must say completely out of context. The problem is with OP's understanding of dynamic_cast throwing an exception or not , and S/He cites a particular example to clear that understanding, OP doesn't want this behavior. –  Alok Save Aug 14 '11 at 13:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.