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I've faced an issue when I'm trying to get the user input using Scanner:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main
{
    public static Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.print("Insert a number: ");
        int number = input.nextInt();
        System.out.print("Text1: ");
        String text1 = input.nextLine();
        System.out.print("Text2: ");
        String text2 = input.nextLine();
    }
}

Output:

Insert a number: 55
Text1: Text2: Hi there!

As you can see, the program skipped String text1 = input.nextLine();. What is the problem here? and how to solve this issue?

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1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/4708219/… –  James Poulson Aug 14 '11 at 12:27
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4 Answers

up vote 51 down vote accepted

The problem is with the input.nextInt() command it only reads the int value. So when you continue reading with input.nextLine() you receive the "\n" Enter key. So to skip this you have to add the input.nextLine(). Hope this should be clear now.

Try it like that:

   System.out.print("Insert a number: ");
   int number = input.nextInt();
   input.nextLine(); // This line you have to add (It consumes the \n character)
   System.out.print("Text1: ");
   String text1 = input.nextLine();
   System.out.print("Text2: ");
   String text2 = input.nextLine();
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umm seems a solution, making the skipped line non-used nextLine, but I still need an explanation of this behaviour –  Eng.Fouad Aug 14 '11 at 12:25
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There seem to be many questions about this issue with java.util.Scanner. I think a more readable/idiomatic solution would be to call scanner.skip("[\r\n]+") to drop any newline characters after calling nextInt().

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It does that because input.nextInt(); doesn't capture the newline. you could do like the others proposed by adding an input.nextLine(); underneath.
Alternatively you can do it C# style and parse a nextLine to an integer like so:

int number = Integer.parseInt(input.nextLine()); 

Doing this works just as well, and it saves you a line of code.

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It's because when you enter a number then press Enter, input.nextInt() consumes only the number, not the "end of line". When input.nextLine() executes, it consumes the "end of line" still in the buffer from the first input.

Instead, use input.nextLine() immediately after input.nextInt()

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Mmm, that bug was corrected in now a days? –  Victor May 29 at 13:28
1  
@Victor it's not bug. it's working as specified. you could argue though that there should be an easy way to tell the api to also consume any whitespace following the target input. –  Bohemian May 29 at 13:38
    
I see. thanks @Bohemian, that exactly what i am arguing. I think that this should be changed, perhaps you can point me where to suggest this "issue" in the next JCP. –  Victor May 29 at 14:55
    
@victor You can request (and find out how to contribute code to) a feature via the Report a Bug or Request a Feature page. –  Bohemian May 29 at 15:18
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