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Introduction

I have encountered an interesting case in my programming job that requires me to implement a mechanism of dynamic class inheritance in python. What I mean when using the term "dynamic inheritance" is a class that doesn't inherit from any base class in particular, but rather chooses to inherit from one or another base class among several possibilities at instanceification (when an instance of this class is created) depending on some parameter.

My question is thus the following: in the case I will present, what would be the best, most standard and "pythonic" way of implemented the needed extra functionality via dynamic inheritance.

To summarize the case in point in a simple manner, I will give an example using two classes that represent two different image formats: 'jpg' and 'png' images. I will then try to add the ability to support a third format: the 'gz' image. I realize my question isn't that simple, but I hope you are ready to bare with me for a few more lines.


The two images example case

This script contains two classes: ImageJPG and ImagePNG, both inheriting from the Image base class. To create an instance of an image object, the user is asked to call the image_factory function with a file path as only parameter.

This function then guesses the file format (jpg or png) from the path and returns an instance of the corresponding class.

Both concrete image classes (ImageJPGand ImagePNG) are able to decode files via their data property. Both do this in a different way. However, both ask the Image base class for a file object in order to do this.

UML diagram 1

import os

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
def image_factory(path):
    '''Guesses the file format from the file extension
       and returns a corresponding image instance.'''
    format = os.path.splitext(path)[1][1:]
    if format == 'jpg': return ImageJPG(path)
    if format == 'png': return ImagePNG(path)
    else: raise Exception('The format "' + format + '" is not supported.')

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class Image(object):
    '''Fake 1D image object consisting of twelve pixels.'''
    def __init__(self, path):
        self.path = path

    def get_pixel(self, x):
        assert x < 12
        return self.data[x]

    @property
    def file_obj(self): return open(self.path, 'r')

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class ImageJPG(Image):
    '''Fake JPG image class that parses a file in a given way.'''

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Joint Photographic Experts Group'

    @property
    def data(self):
        with self.file_obj as f:
            f.seek(-50)
            return f.read(12)

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class ImagePNG(Image):
    '''Fake PNG image class that parses a file in a different way.'''

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Portable Network Graphics'

    @property
    def data(self):
        with self.file_obj as f:
            f.seek(10)
            return f.read(12)

################################################################################
i = image_factory('images/lena.png')
print i.format
print i.get_pixel(5)


The compressed image example case

Building on the first image example case, one would like to add the following functionality:

An extra file format should be supported, the gz format. Instead of being a new image file format, it is simply a compression layer that, once decompressed, reveals either a jpg image or a png image.

The image_factory function keeps its working mechanism and will simply try to create an instance of the concrete image class ImageZIP when it is given a gz file. Exactly in the same way it would create an instance of ImageJPG when given a jpg file.

The ImageZIP class just wants to redefine the file_obj property. In no case does it want to redefine the data property. The crux of the problem is that, depending on what file format is hiding inside the zip archive, the ImageZIP classes needs to inherit either from ImageJPG or from ImagePNG dynamically. The correct class to inherit from can only be determined upon class creation when the path parameter is parsed.

Hence, here is the same script with the extra ImageZIP class and a single added line to the image_factory function.

Obviously, the ImageZIP class is non-functional in this example. This code requires Python 2.7.

UML diagram 2

import os, gzip

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
def image_factory(path):
    '''Guesses the file format from the file extension
       and returns a corresponding image instance.'''
    format = os.path.splitext(path)[1][1:]
    if format == 'jpg': return ImageJPG(path)
    if format == 'png': return ImagePNG(path)
    if format == 'gz':  return ImageZIP(path)
    else: raise Exception('The format "' + format + '" is not supported.')

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class Image(object):
    '''Fake 1D image object consisting of twelve pixels.'''
    def __init__(self, path):
        self.path = path

    def get_pixel(self, x):
        assert x < 12
        return self.data[x]

    @property
    def file_obj(self): return open(self.path, 'r')

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class ImageJPG(Image):
    '''Fake JPG image class that parses a file in a given way.'''

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Joint Photographic Experts Group'

    @property
    def data(self):
        with self.file_obj as f:
            f.seek(-50)
            return f.read(12)

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class ImagePNG(Image):
    '''Fake PNG image class that parses a file in a different way.'''

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Portable Network Graphics'

    @property
    def data(self):
        with self.file_obj as f:
            f.seek(10)
            return f.read(12)

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
class ImageZIP(### ImageJPG OR ImagePNG ? ###):
    '''Class representing a compressed file. Sometimes inherits from
       ImageJPG and at other times inherits from ImagePNG'''

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Compressed ' + super(ImageZIP, self).format

    @property
    def file_obj(self): return gzip.open(self.path, 'r')

################################################################################
i = image_factory('images/lena.png.gz')
print i.format
print i.get_pixel(5)


A possible solution

I have found a way of getting the wanted behavior by intercepting the __new__ call in the ImageZIP class and using the type function. But it feels clumsy and I suspect there might be a better way using some python techniques or design patterns I don't yet know about.

import re

class ImageZIP(object):
    '''Class representing a compressed file. Sometimes inherits from
       ImageJPG and at other times inherits from ImagePNG'''

    def __new__(cls, path):
        if cls is ImageZIP:
            format = re.findall('(...)\.gz', path)[-1]
            if format == 'jpg': return type("CompressedJPG", (ImageZIP,ImageJPG), {})(path)
            if format == 'png': return type("CompressedPNG", (ImageZIP,ImagePNG), {})(path)
        else:
            return object.__new__(cls)

    @property
    def format(self): return 'Compressed ' + super(ImageZIP, self).format

    @property
    def file_obj(self): return gzip.open(self.path, 'r')


Conclusion

Bear in mind if you want to propose a solution that the goal is not to change the behavior of the image_factory function. That function should remain untouched. The goal, ideally, is to build a dynamic ImageZIP class.

I just don't really know what the best way to do this is. But this is a perfect occasion for me to learn more about some of python's "black magic". Maybe my answer lies with strategies like modifying the self.__cls__ attribute after creation or maybe using the __metaclass__ class attribute ? Or maybe something to do with the speical abc abstract base classes could help here ? Or other unexplored python territory ?

Advice greatly appreciated !

share|improve this question
6  
I think you're imposing an artificial constraint that it must be a class inheriting from your existing types. I think a factory function or a class encapsulating one of your types is more Pythonic. For that matter, I think it would be better still to have a generic Image class, with functions or classmethods for loading from different formats. –  Thomas K Aug 14 '11 at 13:42
2  
Everything @Thomas says is right. If you need this, you've structured your inheritance wrong. Call the Image constructor with a "datatype" argument is the obvious way; there are others. Also, keep in mind instead of type() you can just call the __new__ methods of the appropriate base classes in the right order. –  agf Aug 14 '11 at 13:49
2  
I dont get the problem either, you can do your example quite easily with ImagePNG, ImageJPG, CompressedFile classes and stick them together with multiple inheritance ie class CompressedPNG(ImagePNG, CompressedFile) and write a simple image_from_path function. –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 14 '11 at 13:51
1  
also, relying on the file extension to detect the mime-type is really a bad practice, a better solution would be to use the file's magic-bytes (can be done with the magic module) –  MatToufoutu Aug 14 '11 at 15:57
3  
@Glenn Sorry, it seamed hard to explain and I preferred going into all the details than to risk being misinterpreted. –  xApple Aug 14 '11 at 21:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What about defining the ImageZIP class on function-level ?
This will enable your dynamic inheritance.

def image_factory(path):
    # ...

    if format == ".gz":
        image = unpack_gz(path)
        format = os.path.splitext(image)[1][1:]
        if format == "jpg":
            return MakeImageZip(ImageJPG, image)
        elif format == "png":
            return MakeImageZip(ImagePNG, image)
        else: raise Exception('The format "' + format + '" is not supported.')

def MakeImageZIP(base, path):
    '''`base` either ImageJPG or ImagePNG.'''

    class ImageZIP(base):

        # ...

    return  ImageZIP(path)

Edit: Without need to change image_factory

def ImageZIP(path):

    path = unpack_gz(path)
    format = os.path.splitext(image)[1][1:]

    if format == "jpg": base = ImageJPG
    elif format == "png": base = ImagePNG
    else: raise_unsupported_format_error()

    class ImageZIP(base): # would it be better to use   ImageZip_.__name__ = "ImageZIP" ?
        # ...

    return ImageZIP(path)
share|improve this answer
    
I hadn't thought about defining a class inside a function. Nice idea. But for it to work without changing the image_factory function, the new function would have to be called "ImageZIP". –  xApple Aug 15 '11 at 14:11
    
@xApple I've editet the answer. This should be what you are searching for. –  Niklas R Aug 15 '11 at 17:46

I would favor composition over inheritance here. I think your current inheritance hierarchy seems wrong. Some things, like opening the file with or gzip have little to do with the actual image format and can be easily handled in one place while you want to separate the details of working with a specific format own classes. I think using composition you can delegate implementation specific details and have a simple common Image class without requiring metaclasses or multiple inheritance.

import gzip
import struct


class ImageFormat(object):
    def __init__(self, fileobj):
        self._fileobj = fileobj

    @property
    def name(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

    @property
    def magic_bytes(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

    @property
    def magic_bytes_format(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

    def check_format(self):
        peek = self._fileobj.read(len(self.magic_bytes_format))
        self._fileobj.seek(0)
        bytes = struct.unpack_from(self.magic_bytes_format, peek)
        if (bytes == self.magic_bytes):
            return True
        return False

    def get_pixel(self, n):
        # ...
        pass


class JpegFormat(ImageFormat):
    name = "JPEG"
    magic_bytes = (255, 216, 255, 224, 0, 16, 'J', 'F', 'I', 'F')
    magic_bytes_format = "BBBBBBcccc"


class PngFormat(ImageFormat):
    name = "PNG"
    magic_bytes = (137, 80, 78, 71, 13, 10, 26, 10)
    magic_bytes_format = "BBBBBBBB"


class Image(object):
    supported_formats = (JpegFormat, PngFormat)

    def __init__(self, path):
        self.path = path
        self._file = self._open()
        self._format = self._identify_format()

    @property
    def format(self):
        return self._format.name

    def get_pixel(self, n):
        return self._format.get_pixel(n)

    def _open(self):
        opener = open
        if self.path.endswith(".gz"):
            opener = gzip.open
        return opener(self.path, "rb")

    def _identify_format(self):
        for format in self.supported_formats:
            f = format(self._file)
            if f.check_format():
                return f
        else:
            raise ValueError("Unsupported file format!")

if __name__=="__main__":
    jpeg = Image("images/a.jpg")
    png = Image("images/b.png.gz")

I only tested this on a few local png and jpeg files but hopefully it illustrates another way of thinking about this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1! Maybe I'm just not smart enough to handle "advanced" inheritance schemes, but in cases like this I always find composition easier to think about and extend/debug. –  Kevin Little Aug 14 '11 at 20:07
    
Well the inheritance scheme is set in stone so to speak, so I can't compose like that now: the idea of adding compression support comes as an afterthought. Plus, now, for every method f(x) you want to add to your Image class you have to redirect f(x): self._format.f(x) –  xApple Aug 14 '11 at 21:29
1  
Function call overhead does have a cost but I depending on how frequently you make calls to the underlying format there are ways to mitigate that cost. I'm sorry to hear that you inheritance scheme can't be changed. –  stderr Aug 15 '11 at 14:46

If you ever need “black magic”, first try to think about a solution that doesn't require it. You're likely to find something that works better and results in needs clearer code.

It may be better for the image class constructors to take an already opened file instead of a path. Then, you're not limited to files on the disk, but you can use file-like objects from urllib, gzip, and the like.

Also, since you can tell JPG from PNG by looking at the contents of the file, and for gzip file you need this detection anyway, I recommend not looking at the file extension at all.

class Image(object):
    def __init__(self, fileobj):
        self.fileobj = fileobj

def image_factory(path):
    return(image_from_file(open(path, 'rb')))

def image_from_file(fileobj):
    if looks_like_png(fileobj):
        return ImagePNG(fileobj)
    elif looks_like_jpg(fileobj):
        return ImageJPG(fileobj)
    elif looks_like_gzip(fileobj):
        return image_from_file(gzip.GzipFile(fileobj=fileobj))
    else:
        raise Exception('The format "' + format + '" is not supported.')

def looks_like_png(fileobj):
    fileobj.seek(0)
    return fileobj.read(4) == '\x89PNG' # or, better, use a library

# etc.

For black magic, go to What is a metaclass in Python?, but think twice before using that, especially at work.

share|improve this answer
    
Once again, I could change the whole inheritance schema of the project. But at this point it is difficult. The format and image guessing was really just taken as a good example as it would call for a "image_factory" function. I'm not actually dealing with Images. I'm just looking for a way to get some dynamic inheritance to solve my problem without refactoring too much what is already in place. –  xApple Aug 14 '11 at 21:34
1  
Well, you've described that kind of solution in “A possible solution” in your question. As you said, that solution is clumsy, and there is a better way: the better way is refactoring the code so it makes more sense. If you're specifically looking for dynamic classes, you can't get much better than type() calls (except maybe class definitions inside a function, but then if you want a meaningful class name you have to set __name__ afterwards, so it's not much nicer). Sorry, but you have a working solution; I can't help you more. Just beware that you can't subclass your ImageZIP meaningfully. –  Petr Viktorin Aug 15 '11 at 10:46

You should use composition in this case, not inheritance. Take a look at the decorator design pattern. The ImageZIP class should decorate other image classes with the desired functionality.

With decorators, you get a very dynamic behavior depending on the composition that you create:

ImageZIP(ImageJPG(path))

It's more flexible also, you can have other decorators:

ImageDecrypt(password, ImageZIP(ImageJPG(path)))

Each decorator just encapsulates the functionality it adds and delegates to the composed class as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I have looked at decorators design patterns. They don't seam to apply here as a decorator must have, as one of its attribute, an instance of the class it inherits from. What would my decorator inherit from here ? –  xApple Aug 14 '11 at 20:48
    
Your decorator decorates images, so it would inherit from the base Image class. –  Jordão Aug 14 '11 at 20:56
    
But then if my decorator inherits from Image instead of ImageJPEG (or ImagePNG for the matter) the functionality specific to the format is missing, and "i.data" becomes an undefined property ? –  xApple Aug 14 '11 at 21:21
    
The decorator composes the specific class it decorates. You'll create it, e.g., like this in your factory: ImageZIP(ImageJPG(path)). You'll also define a data method that just delegates to the composed instance. –  Jordão Aug 14 '11 at 22:34
    
A code example could be interesting. But I have the impression that we are back at square one, and must include the composition functionality by refactoring the image_facotry function. –  xApple Aug 15 '11 at 14:10

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