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This seems to be basics of the language, but I do not understand how is this accomplished in .Net. I have a member variable in a class, say a bool _isCommitted. I want something to happen whenever _isCommitted is true. Something like this:

     //Whenever _isCommitted == true()
     {
         Foo()
     }

Basically like an event, but here it is my variable. How to? Many thanks..

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1  
Encapsulate it in a property. –  Cody Gray Aug 14 '11 at 15:12
    
I'm a bit confused to mark Oded's or SquidScareMe's as answer as both are same.. :( –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:15
1  
Accept whichever one that you found most useful. It really doesn't matter which one you accept. –  Cody Gray Aug 14 '11 at 15:16
    
Thanks @Cody Gray , I would go for delegate approach :) –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is normally done through properties and a backing private field. You need to ensure you only ever access through the property.

private bool _isCommitted;

public bool IsCommitted
{
  get { return _isCommitted; }
  set
  {
     if(value)
     {
        //do something
     }

     _isCommitted = value;
  }
}
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thanks..Simple... –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:04

At the most basic level, you can create an event in your class:

public delegate void MyHandler(bool b);
public event MyHandler CommittedChanged;

Now people can subscribe to your event like so:

public void SomeHandlerMethod(bool b) { ... }

...

someInstance.CommittedChanged += SomeHandlerMethod;
someInstance.CommittedChanged += ASecondHandlerMethod;
someInstance.CommittedChanged += x => { /* inline handler using lambda */ };

A user can unregister his event handler this way:

someInstance.CommittedChanged -= SomeHandlerMethod;

And wherever you decide to change your variable, you will follow it up with:

if (CommittedChanged != null) CommittedChanged(_isCommitted);

This will call everyone who has registered a function with your event.

Having said this, there are plenty of improvements that you can do. First, make _isCommitted into a property, and do the event callback in its setter. This way, you won't forget to call the handlers.

public IsCommitted { 
   get { return _isCommitted; } 
   set {  
     _isCommitted = value; 
     if (CommittedChanged != null) CommittedChanged(_isCommitted);
   }
}

Read more about events here.

This is enough to get you going. However, if you delve further into the C# framework, you will find a standardized way of using this event framework inside of the System.ComponentModel namespace. Sepcifically, the interface INotifyPropertyChanged, which ties neatly into a more generic event system that also plays well with some of Microsoft's own technologies, such as WPF, allowing GUI elements to pick up on changes to your class automatically. Read more about INotifyPropertyChanged here.

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most comprehensive. Indeed what I was looking for. I find delegate method more right than property method though the latter is simpler.. –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:16
    
//And wherever you decide to change your variable, you will follow it up with: if (CommittedChanged != null) CommittedChanged(_isCommitted); How do I know where the variables are changing? If that was known I can directly call my function Foo() there. I want an approach so that compiler automatically handles the cases where _isCommitted is true. Its value is changed in numerous places.. Hope you got me –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:27
    
Since you should not be allowing people to access _isCommitted directly, all of the code which modifies it should be internal to the class. If you intend to allow outside classes to modify _isCommitted, then you really need to provide a member function or a property setter to accomplish this. If, finally, you absolutely insist on allowing outside people to modify your member variable directly, then you must make public a method which allows them to subsequently fire the event -- in practice, this is often through a protected method (perhaps called FireEvent). –  Michael Hays Aug 14 '11 at 15:30
    
Ultimately, understand that member variables are open to compiler optimization, and that without writing extra code to enforce some contract with the compiler, it will tuck those byes neatly out of reach. Any solution to circumvent those contracts will most likely be exotic and error prone. Using a property is the correct way to do this, as I've shown. :-) Good luck! –  Michael Hays Aug 14 '11 at 15:36
    
Thanks Michael. –  nawfal Aug 15 '11 at 5:31

I think C# properties is what you need.

private bool _isCommitted;

    public bool IsCommitted
    {
        get { return _isCommitted; }
        set { if(value){/*DO SOMETHING HERE*/}
            _isCommitted = value; }
    }
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You basically need PropertyChangedEvent PropertyChangedEventHandler Delegate

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How do you attach this to a simple member variable?? –  marc_s Aug 14 '11 at 15:02
1  
I am afraid you could attach it only to property... –  Darius Kucinskas Aug 14 '11 at 15:03
1  
Exactly - that's the main point: with just a member variable, this won't work - the OP needs to change this to use a property instead (and then he can handle it in the setter-method, too, if appropriate) –  marc_s Aug 14 '11 at 15:04
    
This is what I found the most elegant, but seems like its a bit tricky for my need. Let me see it out.. –  nawfal Aug 14 '11 at 15:05
1  
@marc_s - yes that's true. –  Darius Kucinskas Aug 14 '11 at 15:05

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