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Is there a way, in XAML, to cause the tab item headers to stretch across the width of the tab control.

For example, I have three tabs, red, blue and green. I have a tab control with it's width set to auto, the tab headers will only fill up part of the space above the tab content, I want them to fill up all the space.

I have an idea how to do this in a code behind which I am working on now, but I am interested in doing this the easiest way possible.

Edit--4/7/08

More specifically if I have 4 tabs I want each tab to take up 25% of the space.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I took Jordan's example and made some changes to it. This version should work for any number of tabs:

namespace WpfApplication1.Converters
{
    public class TabSizeConverter : IMultiValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter,
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            TabControl tabControl = values[0] as TabControl;
            double width = tabControl.ActualWidth / tabControl.Items.Count;
            //Subtract 1, otherwise we could overflow to two rows.
            return (width <= 1) ? 0 : (width - 1);
        }

        public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetTypes, object parameter,
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }
}

Same namespace in the xaml:

xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1.Converters"

And this will make all tabs use it:

<Window.Resources>
    <local:TabSizeConverter x:Key="tabSizeConverter" />
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}">
        <Setter Property="Width">
            <Setter.Value>
                <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource tabSizeConverter}">
                    <Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor,
            AncestorType={x:Type TabControl}}" />
                    <Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor,
            AncestorType={x:Type TabControl}}" Path="ActualWidth" />
                </MultiBinding>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>
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I would cap the return value of the converter with return width < 0 ? 0 : width - 1 otherwise it could raise an exception –  Sergey Aldoukhov Jul 30 '09 at 21:32
    
Will the width ever actually be less than 0 though? It might be able to, but either way I'll include this but with a minor modification. It should actually be return (width <= 1) ? 0 : (width - 1); in case width is between 0 and 1 to prevent a negative result. –  Ryan Versaw Jul 31 '09 at 5:19
1  
when using this the tabitems stack on top of each other, but if i change the (width - 1) to (width - 2.1) then it "works", but i appear to have one pixel space on either side of the tabitems. something i'm not doing correctly? –  ChrisHDog Nov 12 '10 at 7:03
1  
I get the same result as @ChrisHDog when the number of tab items is <= 3. With four and above it works great. I've changed my result to be: return (width <= 1) ? 0 : (width - 1.34); which seems to take care of all numbers of tab items. –  Mike L Jul 19 '12 at 1:38
    
@RyanVersaw:Simply Awesome :) –  Priyank Thakkar Nov 25 '13 at 12:46

It is possible by binding the width to the ActualWidth of the parent tab control as shown below.

I have wrapped it in a style to apply to all tab pages.

<Grid>
      <Grid.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="TabItem">
            <Setter Property="Width" Value="{Binding    
                     Path=ActualWidth,    
                     RelativeSource={RelativeSource    
                    Mode=FindAncestor,    
                    AncestorType={x:Type TabControl}}}"/>
        </Style>
    </Grid.Resources>

<TabControl>
    <TabItem Header="Page3"/>
    <TabItem Header="Page2"/>
    <TabItem Header="Page3"/>            
</TabControl> 
</Grid>
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This would just make every TabItem occupy the full width. What is needed, they need to share the width. –  Sergey Aldoukhov Jul 30 '09 at 19:32
    
Agreed, this was written before the question was edited. –  John Jul 31 '09 at 10:58

I was able to do this using a Converter like so:

namespace WpfApplication1.Converters
{
    public class SizeConverter : IValueConverter
    {
    	#region IValueConverter Members

    	public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter,
    		System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    	{
    		double width = Double.Parse(value.ToString());
    		//Subtract 1, otherwise we could overflow to two rows.
    		return .25 * width - 1;
    	}

    	public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter,
    		System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    	{
    		throw new NotSupportedException();
    	}

    	#endregion
    }
}

Then adding the namespace to my xaml:

xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1.Converters"

Then making all of the TabItems use the converter:

<Window.Resources>
    	<local:SizeConverter x:Key="sizeConverter" />
    	<Style TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}">
    		<Setter Property="Width" Value="{Binding ElementName=x_Grid, Path=ActualWidth, Converter={StaticResource sizeConverter}}" />
    	</Style>
    </Window.Resources>

x_Grid is the x:Name of the parent element I want the tabs to be 1/4 of, if that makes sense.

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I apologize for the tremendous amount of whitespace below the code. I don't know why it's doing that. –  Jordan H. Apr 29 '09 at 19:07
    
Also, you can make the converter as complicated as you want. You could go get the TabControl, look at its Items and see how many there are, and then use that to calculate your width. –  Jordan H. Apr 29 '09 at 19:12
    
Jordan: Thanks mate, this works a treat :) P.S. "Object Value" comes into the Convert function as a double, so you can just cast it "double height = (double)value;" +1 BTW :) –  Binary Worrier May 3 '09 at 11:43

Everyone seems to be going the converter route, but it really is as simple as using a UniformGrid with Rows set to 1 in the TabControl template, in place of the TabPanel. Of course, you will have to re-template it, but this isn't too bad.

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It works perfectly and it is so much simpler (given that you like to mess up with templates.. but you do, right ?) –  Jérôme Oct 16 at 10:17
    
Once you pop you can't stop. :) –  Charlie Oct 24 at 0:46

I have solved this problem by creating a special converter:

    public class TabItemWidthAdjustmentConverter : IValueConverter
    {
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        Double lTabControlWidth = value is Double ? (Double)value : 50; // 50 just to see something, in case of error
        Int32 lTabsCount = (parameter != null && parameter is String) ? Int32.Parse((String)parameter) : 1;
        return lTabControlWidth / lTabsCount;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
    }

And I calculate the value of one tab item in the Tag element of the TabControl, to avoid calculating it for each tab separately. Here is the sample code (Note that In my case I needed a horizontal ScrollViewer, because I have multiple tab items, and with a minimum width):

<TabControl Name="tabControl" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" SelectionChanged="TabControl_SelectionChanged" 
                    Tag="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Path=ActualWidth, Converter={StaticResource tabItemWidthAdjustmentConverter}, ConverterParameter=15}"><!-- Here 15 because I have 15 tabs -->
            <TabControl.Template>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="TabControl">
                    <StackPanel>
                        <ScrollViewer HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Disabled">
                            <TabPanel x:Name="HeaderPanel"
                                      Panel.ZIndex="1"
                                      KeyboardNavigation.TabIndex="1"
                                      IsItemsHost="True"/>
                        </ScrollViewer>
                        <ContentPresenter x:Name="PART_SelectedContentHost" SnapsToDevicePixels="{TemplateBinding SnapsToDevicePixels}"
                                          Margin="{TemplateBinding Padding}"
                                          ContentSource="SelectedContent"/>
                    </StackPanel>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </TabControl.Template>
            <TabItem Header="Tab1" MinWidth="115" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" Width="{Binding ElementName=tabControl, Path=Tag}">
                <ContentControl ContentTemplate="{StaticResource My_TemplateTab1}">
                    <ContentPresenter />
                </ContentControl>
            </TabItem>
            <TabItem Header="Tab2" MinWidth="115" Height="50" Width="{Binding ElementName=tabControl, Path=Tag}">
                <ContentControl ContentTemplate="{StaticResource My_TemplateTab2}">
                    <ContentPresenter />
                </ContentControl>
            </TabItem>
            <!-- Here another 13 tabs which I skipped -->
            </TabControl>

I can say that this works like a charm in my case :) Hope someone will find it useful!

P.S. I did not need/want any style in my case.

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Your solution is the only one which kind of worked! Thanks a lot. The only problem I encountered is that the ActualWidth of the TabControl is zero on initialization. When I retrieved the ActualWidth in the Loaded event handler, it is 450. Do you know why / how to solve that? –  Lumocra Aug 29 '13 at 10:41
1  
Please read the description of the WPF window events in here (espetially Initialized and Loaded): blogs.msdn.com/b/mikehillberg/archive/2006/09/19/… –  XMight Sep 20 '13 at 14:51
    
Your point is that, that what is happening is logical? At least that is what I make up out of the blog post (Thanks for that by the way) Since it is some days ago already I don't know why it was a problem for me. It is working good now, with the code in the Loaded event. Thanks! :-) –  Lumocra Sep 23 '13 at 10:02
    
Yep this is logical. It means that you somehow in your code accessed ActualWidth before you had any actual value in it. Happy it works for you now! –  XMight Sep 23 '13 at 14:05

I don't know if it will work for tabs, but whenever I've needed to stretch anything to fill a container I've used a ViewBox. Is that the kind of thing you're looking for?

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In addition to Ryan Versaw's accecpted solution which gives equal tabItem header widths, I found the following way to make it dependent on the length of each header.

First we get the string of each tabItem header by adding this line to the xaml multibinding. Thus it becomes:

<MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource tabSizeConverter}">
           <Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type TabControl}}" />
           <Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type TabControl}}" Path="ActualWidth" />
           <Binding Path="Header" RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Self}"/>
</MultiBinding>

And a bit more of code in the Converter (values[] gets also the tabItem Header):

public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter,
        System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        TabControl tabControl = values[0] as TabControl;

        string AllHeaders = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < tabControl.Items.Count; i++)
        {
            int index = tabControl.Items[i].ToString().IndexOf("Header:") + "Header:".Length;
            string currentHeader = tabControl.Items[i].ToString().Substring(index);
            currentHeader = currentHeader.Substring(0, currentHeader.Length - " Content:".Length);
            AllHeaders += currentHeader;
        }

        //Normalize width according to header length
        double width = values[2].ToString().Length * tabControl.ActualWidth / AllHeaders.Length;

        //Subtract 1, otherwise we could overflow to two rows.
        var retVal = (width <= 1) ? 0 : (width - 1);
        return retVal;
    }

I suspect there might be a more efficient way to get the AllHeaders string of all the headers, but it works fine as it is ...

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