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what is the limit of memory that printf can utilize for storing its computed arguments? What is the general memory size available for any command (with variable no. of arguments), to store its arguments?

Example code:

#include <stdio.h>

#include <stdlib.h>


int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

//by default the decimal is considered as double

float a = 0.9;

//long double b = (long double)23455556668989898988988998898999.99 ;

long double b = 5.32e-5;

double  z = 6789999000000.8999;


//b = (long double)1.99999999;

printf("float %f, \n double %lf,\n long double %Lf\n\n\n", b, b, b);

printf("simple:  long double %Lf, double %lf, float %f\n\n\n", b,b,b);

printf(" sumi: float %f, double %lf, long double %Lf\n\n\n", z, z, z);

printf("test2 for le/lg/lf: dbl f %Lf, double g %Lg, double e %Le\n\n\n", b, b, b);  

  system("PAUSE");  

  return 0;

}
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Example of code where the size is exceeded: –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:16
    
#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { //long double b = (long double)23455556668989898988988998898999.99 ; long double b = 5.32e-5; double z = 6789999000000.8999; //b = (long double)1.99999999; printf("float %f, \n double %lf,\n long double %Lf\n\n\n", b, b, b); printf("simple: long double %Lf, double %lf, float %f\n\n\n", b,b,b); printf(" sum: float %f, double %lf, long double %Lf\n\n\n", z, z, z); printf("test2 for le/lg/lf: dbl f %Lf, double g %Lg, double e %Le\n\n\n", b, b, b); system("PAUSE"); return 0; } –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:18
    
You can use the "edit" link to add code to your question, rather than posting it as a comment. –  Cody Gray Aug 14 '11 at 17:34
    
thanks.. i did not notice it would do that –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The minimum memory requirements for printf to support printing any of the types you can pass to it is about 6k of stack space, assuming 15-bit exponent on long double. For any non-floating-point type, you could get by with 200 bytes or less.

Of course most real-world implementations are not maximally-efficient here. glibc at least performs malloc as part of printf, at least for some formats, and thus has unpredictable failure cases. As far as I can tell this is just lazy coding... No idea what MS's printf does but I wouldn't expect quality code there either...

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Also note that the usages I cited in the first paragraph are not "per argument" but "peak usage". Once one argument has been converted and output, there's no need to save any of the working data from processing it; printf can just move on to the next one. The only way memory usage will grow proportional to the number of arguments is if printf internally makes a structure to store all of the arguments, argument types, or format specifiers. glibc does this for some nonstandard extensions but it may also be useful for POSIX i18n (%N$ type) format string handling. –  R.. Aug 14 '11 at 18:23

There is no specific limit. The biggest danger in an excessive #/arguments is in accidentally overflowing the stack.

What a great question for "stackoverflow.com" ;-)

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Can you specify a link where i can find the implementations? –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:07
    
Find glibc or uClibc sources. –  George Gaál Aug 14 '11 at 17:09
    
The Windows C run-time library is delivered with VisualStudio, including the source code. Just tick the appropriate checkbox on installation. The Linux or GNU C library can be found on gnu.org/software/libc (with source code of course). –  Codo Aug 14 '11 at 17:10

Typically the arguments just go on the call stack, so in a single threaded application, your main limitation is the size of the stack. On Posix, you can use getrlimits() to discover that size, or the Bash built-in ulimit.

A more interesting question might be how much memory printf has for the resulting string, and whether or not it has to perform allocations.

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why did you mention single threaded? the same stack argument holds for multi-threaded. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 14 '11 at 17:06
    
Not really. In multi-threaded programs, each thread has its own stack, and it's usually allocated out of the process' normal memory limit, not its stack limit. –  David Schwartz Aug 14 '11 at 17:08
    
Yeah, but every thread has its own stack, so the analysis is a bit more complicated. –  Kerrek SB Aug 14 '11 at 17:08
    
@Kerrek Sb: i experimented with that it seems if one prints ahardcoded string like printf("dffffffffff"); there is no limit to what one can print. But if we are passing things as arguments (like float, double, long double,etc) then there is a limit till which it can store these arguments.. or even worse ignore them.. –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:11
    
@Nik: I'm not entirely sure what you mean, perhaps add some code to your question to explain more clearly. It's possible that a call to printf with no extra arguments is handed through to puts, but otherwise I think all this is just a consequence of what I said... –  Kerrek SB Aug 14 '11 at 17:20

There is no fixed limit. Some systems have only few bytes of stack (maybe 128 or 256), others have mebibytes of them. Some have heap, which is then used by functions, others do not. Some internal functions might use static memory, other implementations don't.

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Can you specify a link where i can find the implementations? –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:06
    
@Nik: which OS/libc ? –  Karoly Horvath Aug 14 '11 at 17:07
    
windows 7, gcc compiler –  Nik Aug 14 '11 at 17:14

That depends on the implementation and the setup (OS, settings, etc.). Generally, local variables and arguments are stored on a stack, and how big such a stack is depends on the platform, personal settings, etc.

If is generally not good to store large values on the stack. If your function calls other functions, they also need stack space, etc.

And not every implementation might even use a stack, or it may be pretty small.

Just don't store too large values in the local frame.

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printf is not required to store anything. And it can be implemented this way. Get argument and print it to output with formatting.

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