Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand the syntax and general semantics of pointers versus references, what I can't decide is when is it more-or-less appropriate to use references or pointers in an API?

Naturally some situations need one or the other (operator++ needs a reference argument), but in general I'm finding I prefer to use pointers (and const pointers) as the syntax is clear that the variables are being passed destructively.

E.g. in the following code:

void add_one(int& n) { n += 1; }
void add_one(int* const n) { *n += 1; }
int main() {
  int a = 0;
  add_one(a); // not clear that a may be modified
  add_one(&a); // a is clearly being passed destructively
}

With the pointer, it's always (more) obvious what's going on, so for APIs and the like where clarity is a big concern are pointers not more appropriate than references? Does that mean references should only be used when necessary (e.g. operator++)? Are there any performance concerns with one or the other?

EDIT (OUTDATED):

Besides allowing NULL values and dealing with raw arrays, it seems the choice comes down to personal preference. I've accepted the answer below that references Google's C++ Style Guide, as they present the view that "References can be confusing, as they have value syntax but pointer semantics.".

EDIT:

Due to the additional work required to sanitise pointer arguments that should not be NULL (e.g. add_one(0) will call the pointer version and break during runtime), it makes sense from a maintainability perspective to use references where an object MUST be present, though it is a shame to lose the syntactic clarity.

share|improve this question
    
It's clear that it may be modified when it's a non-const reference. A const reference, on the other hand, clearly states it can't be modified. They look the same on calling, but most of the time intellisense (or something similar) will tell you what's up, and you can deduce from that. Otherwise, you could just document your API ;) –  Schnommus Aug 14 '11 at 17:12
2  
It seems like you've already made your decision about which one to use when. Personally, I prefer to pass in the object that I'm acting on, whether or not I'm modifying it. If a function takes a pointer, that tells me that it's acting on pointers, i.e. using them as iterators in an array. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 14 '11 at 17:19
    
@Schnommus: It's only clear when you're looking at the method declaration, it's not always convenient when reading over code to look at the definition of every method called. –  connec Aug 14 '11 at 18:26
1  
@Schnommus: Fair enough, I mostly use TextMate. Still, I think it's preferable that the meaning would be obvious from a glance. –  connec Aug 14 '11 at 18:33
9  
@connec: The Google C++ style guide is not considered a good C++ style guide. It is a style guide for working with Google's old C++ code base (i.e. good for their stuff). Accepting an answer based on that is not helping anybody. Just reading your comments and explanation you came to this question with an already set opinion and are just looking for other people to confirm your view. As a result you are basing the question and answer to what you want/expect to hear. –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 22:23

13 Answers 13

up vote 82 down vote accepted

Use reference wherever you can, pointers wherever you must.

Avoid pointers until you can't.

The reason is that pointers make things harder to follow/read, less safe and far more dangerous manipulations than any other constructs.

So the rule of thumb is to use pointers only if there is no other choice.

For example, returning a pointer to an object is a valid option when the function can return nullptr in some cases and it is assumed it will. That said, a better option would be to use something similar to boost::optional.

Another example is to use pointers to raw memory for specific memory manipulations. That should be hidden and localized in very narrow parts of the code, to help limit the dangerous parts of the whole code base.

In your example, there is no point in using a pointer as argument because:

  1. if you provide nullptr as the argument, you're going in undefined-behaviour-land;
  2. the reference attribute version doesn't allow (without easy to spot tricks) the problem with 1.
  3. the reference attribute version is simpler to understand for the user: you have to provide a valid object, not something that could be null.

If the behaviour of the function would have to work with or without a given object, then using a pointer as attribute suggests that you can pass nullptr as the argument and it is fine for the function. That's kind of a contract between the user and the implementation.

share|improve this answer
12  
I'm not sure that pointers make anything harder to read? It's a fairly simple concept and makes it clear when something is likely to be modified. If anything I'd say it's harder to read when there's no indication of what's happening, why should add_one(a) not return the result, rather than set it by reference? –  connec Aug 14 '11 at 18:21
14  
@connec: If add_one(a) is confusing, then that is because it is improperly named. add_one(&a) would have the same confusion, only now you might be incrementing the pointer and not the object. add_one_inplace(a) would avoid all confusion. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 14 '11 at 22:19
7  
One point, references can refer to memory that can go away just as easily as pointers can. So they are not necessarily any safer than pointers. Persisting and passing references can be just as dangerous as pointers. –  Doug T. Aug 15 '11 at 0:44
2  
connec> Simple construct, easy to understand alone, but hard to follow in context. When you use a pointer in C++, if you don't add tons of asserts, you have only few guarantees about what is pointed. –  Klaim Aug 15 '11 at 7:44
2  
@user805547 Actually it is currently recommended to use pointers as "not owning" pointers because it's less expensive than other alternatives. A more explicit standard pointer type would be useful to make it more clear but right now it's ok to use raw pointer to express absence of ownership, at least in a modern-c++ code base. –  Klaim Dec 5 '12 at 13:25

The performances are exactly the same, as references are implemented internally as pointers. Thus you do not need to worry about that.

There is no generally accepted convention regarding when to use references and pointers. In a few cases you have to return or accept references (copy constructor, for instance), but other than that you are free to do as you wish. A rather common convention I've encountered is to use references when the parameter must refer an existing object and pointers when a NULL value is ok.

Some coding convention (like Google's) prescribe that one should always use pointers, or const references, because references have a bit of unclear-syntax: they have reference behaviour but value syntax.

share|improve this answer
5  
Just to add a little to this, Google's style guide says that input parameters to functions should be const references and outputs should be pointers. I like this because it makes it very clear when you read a function signature what is an input and what's an output. –  Dan Aug 14 '11 at 18:43
21  
@Dan: The Google style guide is for Google's old code, and shouldn't be used for modern coding. In fact, it's a rather bad coding style for a new project. –  GManNickG Aug 14 '11 at 19:53
11  
@connec: Let me put it this way: null is a perfectly valid pointer value. Anywhere there's a pointer, I can give it the value null. Ergo your second version of add_one is broken: add_one(0); // passing a perfectly valid pointer value, kaboom. You need to check if it's null. Some people will retort: "well I'll just document that my function doesn't work with null". That's fine, but then you defeat the purpose of the question: if you're going to look to the documentation to see if null is okay, you'll also see the function declaration. –  GManNickG Aug 14 '11 at 19:57
7  
If it were a reference you'd see that to be the case. Such a retort misses the point though: References enforce on a language level that it refers to an existing object, and not possibly null, while pointers have no such restriction. I think it's clear that language-level enforcement is more powerful and less error-prone than documentation-level enforcement. Some will try to retort to this by saying: "Look, null reference: int& i = *((int*)0);. This isn't a valid retort. The issue in the previous code lies with the pointer use, not with the reference. References are never null, period. –  GManNickG Aug 14 '11 at 19:59
6  
Hello, I saw lack of language lawyers in the comments so let me remedy: references are usually implemented by pointers but the standard says no such thing. An implementation using some other mechanism would be 100% complaint. –  Andreas Bonini Aug 14 '11 at 21:42

From C++ FAQ Lite -

Use references when you can, and pointers when you have to.

References are usually preferred over pointers whenever you don't need "reseating". This usually means that references are most useful in a class's public interface. References typically appear on the skin of an object, and pointers on the inside.

The exception to the above is where a function's parameter or return value needs a "sentinel" reference — a reference that does not refer to an object. This is usually best done by returning/taking a pointer, and giving the NULL pointer this special significance (references must always alias objects, not a dereferenced NULL pointer).

Note: Old line C programmers sometimes don't like references since they provide reference semantics that isn't explicit in the caller's code. After some C++ experience, however, one quickly realizes this is a form of information hiding, which is an asset rather than a liability. E.g., programmers should write code in the language of the problem rather than the language of the machine.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess you could argue that if you're using an API you should be familiar with what it does and know whether or not the passed parameter is modified or not... something to consider, but I find myself agreeing with the C programmers (though I've little C experience myself). I'd add though that clearer syntax is of benefit to programmers as well as machines. –  connec Aug 14 '11 at 18:16
    
@connec: Sure the C programmer have it correct for their language. But do not make the mistake of treating C++ as C. It is a completely different language. If you treat C++ as C you end up writing what is refereed to coequally as C with class (which is not C++). –  Loki Astari Aug 14 '11 at 22:32

Use a pointer

  • when you may need a null pointer (since there are no null references),
  • when you're handling "bare" arrays (by a pointer to the first element),
  • when you're returning newly allocated objects (but prefer a smart pointer).

Use a reference otherwise.

Note that the second reason for using pointers nullifies your argument against them: it's not clearer to use a pointer, since they may stand for entire arrays, unless you use T * const pointer, which IMHO is not clearer than a T &. (E.g., char * is usually not a pointer to a single character but a C-style string.)

There's no difference in performance.

share|improve this answer
1  
For reason one, some, including myself, would prefer boost::optional. I think it makes the intent much more clear. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 14 '11 at 17:23
1  
Yes, but then not everyone can use Boost all the time; you might not want to force it upon users of an API. –  larsmans Aug 14 '11 at 17:29
    
@larsmans Implementing boost::optional yourself is a piece of cake, so at least do that if you don't use boost. –  user1203803 Apr 9 '12 at 8:30
    
Also, for point 3: just return by value. The compiler is allowed (and AFAIK even required) to use move semantics if the object is created in the function. –  user1203803 Apr 9 '12 at 8:32
1  
Personally I prefer returning raw pointers for allocated objects because that means I can use any smart pointer. If the designer picked a smart pointer as the return value then I am forced into using boost::shared_ptr or std::auto_ptr or gizmo::super_duper_ptr. –  Zan Lynx Aug 26 '13 at 21:57

Like others already answered: Always use references, unless the variable being NULL/nullptr is really a valid state.

John Carmack's viewpoint on the subject is similar:

NULL pointers are the biggest problem in C/C++, at least in our code. The dual use of a single value as both a flag and an address causes an incredible number of fatal issues. C++ references should be favored over pointers whenever possible; while a reference is “really” just a pointer, it has the implicit contract of being not-NULL. Perform NULL checks when pointers are turned into references, then you can ignore the issue thereafter.

http://www.altdevblogaday.com/2011/12/24/static-code-analysis/

Edit 2012-03-13

User Bret Kuhns rightly remarks:

The C++11 standard has been finalized. I think it's time in this thread to mention that most code should do perfectly fine with a combination of references, shared_ptr, and unique_ptr.

True enough, but the question still remains, even when replacing raw pointers with smart pointers.

For example, both std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr can be constructed as "empty" pointers through their default constructor:

... meaning that using them without verifying they are not empty risks a crash, which is exactly what J. Carmack's discussion is all about.

And then, we have the amusing problem of "how do we pass a smart pointer as a function parameter?"

Jon's answer for the question C++ - passing references to boost::shared_ptr, and the following comments show that even then, passing a smart pointer by copy or by reference is not as clear cut as one would like (I favor myself the "by-reference" by default, but I could be wrong).

share|improve this answer
1  
The C++11 standard has been finalized. I think it's time in this thread to mention that most code should do perfectly fine with a combination of references, shared_ptr, and unique_ptr. Ownership semantics and in/out parameter conventions are taken care of by a combination of these three pieces and const'ness. There is almost no need for raw pointers in C++ except when dealing with legacy code and very optimized algorithms. Those areas where they are used should be as encapsulated as possible and convert any raw pointers to the semantically appropriate "modern" equivalent. –  Bret Kuhns Sep 13 '12 at 13:42

Disclaimer: other than the fact that references cannot be NULL nor "rebound" (meaning thay can't change the object they're the alias of), it really comes down to a matter of taste, so I'm not going to say "this is better".

That said, I disagree with your last statement in the post, in that I don't think the code loses clarity with references. In your example,

add_one(&a);

might be clearer than

add_one(a);

since you know that most likely the value of a is going to change. On the other hand though, the signature of the function

void add_one(int* const n);

is somewhat not clear either: is n going to be a single integer or an array? Sometimes you only have access to (poorly documentated) headers, and signatures like

foo(int* const a, int b);

are not easy to interpret at first sight.

Imho, references are as good as pointers when no (re)allocation nor rebinding (in the sense explained before) is needed. Moreover, if a developer only uses pointers for arrays, functions signatures are somewhat less ambiguous. Not to mention the fact that operators syntax is way more readable with references.

share|improve this answer

Any performance difference would be so small that it wouldn't justify using the approach that's less clear.

First, one case that wasn't mentioned where references are generally superior is const references. For non-simple types, passing a const reference avoids creating a temporary and doesn't cause the confusion you're concerned about (because the value isn't modified). Here, forcing a person to pass a pointer causes the very confusion you're worried about, as seeing the address taken and passed to a function might make you think the value changed.

In any event, I basically agree with you. I don't like functions taking references to modify their value when it's not very obvious that this is what the function is doing. I too prefer to use pointers in that case.

When you need to return a value in a complex type, I tend to prefer references. For example:

bool GetFooArray(array &foo); // my preference
bool GetFooArray(array *foo); // alternative

Here, the function name makes it clear that you're getting information back in an array. So there's no confusion.

The main advantages of references are that they always contain a valid value, are cleaner than pointers, and support polymorphism without needing any extra syntax. If none of these advantages apply, there is no reason to prefer a reference over a pointer.

share|improve this answer

Copied from wiki-

A consequence of this is that in many implementations, operating on a variable with automatic or static lifetime through a reference, although syntactically similar to accessing it directly, can involve hidden dereference operations that are costly. References are a syntactically controversial feature of C++ because they obscure an identifier's level of indirection; that is, unlike C code where pointers usually stand out syntactically, in a large block of C++ code it may not be immediately obvious if the object being accessed is defined as a local or global variable or whether it is a reference (implicit pointer) to some other location, especially if the code mixes references and pointers. This aspect can make poorly written C++ code harder to read and debug (see Aliasing).

I agree 100% with this, and this is why I believe that you should only use a reference when you a have very good reason for doing so.

share|improve this answer
    
I also agree to a large extent, however I'm coming round to the view that the loss of built-in protection against NULL pointers is a bit too costly for purely syntactic concerns, especially as - although more explicit - pointer syntax is pretty ugly anyway. –  connec Aug 14 '11 at 22:24
    
I suppose the circumstance would be an important factor as well. I think trying to use references when the current code base predominantly uses pointers would be a bad idea. If you expect their to be references then the fact that their so implicit is less important maybe.. –  user606723 Aug 14 '11 at 22:28

It is not a matter of taste. Here are some definitive rules.

If you want to refer to a statically declared variable within the scope in which it was declared then use a C++ reference and it will be perfectly safe. The same applies to a statically declared smart pointer. Passing paramaters by reference is an example of this usage.

If you want to refer to anything from a scope that is wider than the scope in which it is declared then you should use a reference counted smart pointer for it to be perfectly safe.

You can refer to an element of a collection with a reference for syntactic convenience but it is not safe, the element can be deleted at anytime.

To safely hold a reference to an element of a collection you must use a reference counted smart pointer.

share|improve this answer

My rule of thumb is:

  • Use pointers for outgoing or in/out parameters. So it can be seen that the value is going to be changed. (You must use &)
  • Use pointers if NULL parameter is acceptable value. (Make sure it's const if it's an incoming parameter)
  • Use references for incoming parameter if it cannot be NULL and is not a primitive type (const T&).
  • Use pointers or smart pointers when returning a newly created object.
  • Use pointers or smart pointers as struct or class members instead of references.
  • Use references for aliasing (eg. int &current = someArray[i])

Regardless which one you use, don't forget to document your functions and the meaning of their parameters if they are not obvious.

share|improve this answer

For pointers , you need them to point to something, so pointers cost memory space. for example a function that takes an integer pointer will not take the integer variable. So you will need to create a pointer for that first to pass on to the function. As for reference, it will not cost memory. You have an integer variable, you can pass it as a reference variable that's it. You dont need to create a reference variable specially for it.

share|improve this answer

Just putting my dime in. I just performed a test. A sneeky one at that. I just let g++ create the assembly files of the same mini-program using pointers compared to using references. When looking at the output they are exactly the same. Other than the symbolnaming. So looking at performance (in a simple example) there is no issue.

Now on the topic of pointers vs references. IMHO I think clearity stands above all. As soon as I read implicit behaviour my toes start to curl. I agree that it is nice implicit behaviour that a reference cannot be NULL.

Dereferencing a NULL pointer is not the problem. it will crash your application and will be easy to debug. A bigger problem is uninitialized pointers containing invalid values. This will most likely result in memory corruption causing undefined behaviour without a clear origin.

This is where I think references are much safer than pointers. And I agree with a previous statement, that the interface (which should be clearly documented, see design by contract, Bertrand Meyer) defines the result of the parameters to a function. Now taking this all into consideration my preferences go to using references wherever/whenever possible.

share|improve this answer

In general a member variable should never be a reference because there is no point in that. It causes the class to be non-assignable if you do not provide an assignment operator. Also once you set the member reference to refer to some object, it is not possible to change that member for referring another object. The most appropriate usage of a reference is using as a function parameter which enables pass by reference.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.