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I'm still a little new to Linq-To-SQL and I'm having a problem when I try to use the join operator (doing the equivalent of an SQL inner join).

Get all the preferences for a user:

return (from u in DataContext.UserPreference
join p in DataContext.Preference on p.Id equals u.PreferenceId
where u.UserId = userId
select p).ToList();

Visual Studio tells me that the "join" operator in the query is an "ambiguous call" between the Enumerable class and the Queryable class.

Any ideas how I can resolve this?

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What are the full types of the two members (Preferece and UserPreference)? –  Marc Gravell Aug 14 '11 at 17:29
    
My own types. They don't inherit anything besides dedicated interfaces. MyApp.Entity.UserPreference : MyApp.Entity.IUserPreference MyApp.Entity.Preference : MyApp.Entity.IPreference –  Liam Smith Aug 14 '11 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your join is expressed the wrong way round - you should be using u first, then p:

return (from u in DataContext.UserPreference
        join p in DataContext.Preference on u.PreferenceId equals p.Id
        where u.UserId == userId
        select p).ToList();

Basically you use the first range variable on the left side of the join, and the second variable on the right side.

Usually this sort of error is spotted by the compiler which suggests exactly what's wrong. I don't know why it didn't in this case, but either way the above should be the fix.

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That's very strange; why does the order matter? –  Jacob Aug 14 '11 at 17:37
1  
here u.UserId == userId surely? An assignment inside a linq statement is usually pretty weird, and generates that error too. –  blowdart Aug 14 '11 at 17:53
1  
@Jacob: Because of the way that query syntax is translated. It's a mostly mechanical translation which turns each part of a query expression into lambda expressions. You ended up with two lambda expressions of p => u.PreferenceId and u => p.Id. –  Jon Skeet Aug 14 '11 at 17:53
    
@blowdart: Unless UserId is of type bool :) Fixed - I was just concentrating on the join, but it's a good point. –  Jon Skeet Aug 14 '11 at 17:53
    
Which may in fact point to the original problem anyway, it's not order, it's the assignment operator in the query. –  blowdart Aug 14 '11 at 17:56

I'm going to disagree with Jon. You have an assignment operator in the 3rd line your query, and not the equality operator, so instead

return (from u in DataContext.UserPreference
        join p in DataContext.Preference on p.Id equals u.PreferenceId
        where u.UserId == userId
        select p).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Good spot, but it shouldn't cause an error re the join. Valid point, though –  Marc Gravell Aug 14 '11 at 18:09
    
Ah but it does, every time I get that darned message it's always because I messed up == :) –  blowdart Aug 14 '11 at 18:14
    
then get over to Mads and Eric, and moan at them about compiler messages :) interesting –  Marc Gravell Aug 14 '11 at 18:29
    
grin I should do, but they scare me :) –  blowdart Aug 14 '11 at 23:45

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