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I'm trying to get a pointer to a specific version of an overloaded member function. Here's the example:

class C
{
  bool f(int) { ... }
  bool f(double) { ... }

  bool example()
  {
    // I want to get the "double" version.
    typedef bool (C::*MemberFunctionType)(double);
    MemberFunctionType pointer = &C::f;   // <- Visual C++ complains
  }
};

The error message is "error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'overloaded-function' to 'MemberFunctionType'"

This works if f is not overloaded, but not in the example above. Any suggestion?

EDIT

Beware, the code above did not reflect my real-world problem, which was that I had forgotten a "const" - this is what the accepted answer points out. I'll leave the question as it is, though, because I think the problem could happen to others.

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did a quick test and everything compiles. code looks OK - if this is your original code of course :D have you also the const-ness exactly as that? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 '09 at 14:55
    
Which version of MSVC are you using. It works fine in 2008. –  Eclipse Apr 1 '09 at 14:56
    
@litb - you were right! May I suggest that you post your comment on const-correctness, just for the pleasure of upvoting and accepting it ;-) –  Carl Seleborg Apr 1 '09 at 15:04
    
of course. i'll have great enjoyment :p –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 '09 at 15:07
    
Why not edit the question to reflect the important information about const? Without that in the mix, the question makes no sense and is confusing. And litb's answer is confusing since it makes it seem like the const is required for this to work at all, where if it's left out altogether, no problem. –  Michael Burr Apr 1 '09 at 15:53
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1 Answer

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Well, i'll answer what i put as comment already so it can be accepted. Problem is with constness:

class C
{
  bool f(int) { ... }
  bool f(double) const { ... }

  bool example()
  {
    // I want to get the "double" version.
    typedef bool (C::*MemberFunctionType)(double) const; // const required!
    MemberFunctionType pointer = &C::f;
  }
};

Clarification:

The original question didn't contain that const. I did a wild guess in the comments whether he possibly has f being a const member function in the real code (because at a yet earlier iteration, it turned out yet another thing was missing/different to the real-world code :p). He actually had it being a const member function, and told me i should post this as an answer.

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1  
why I have to put const in the pointer declaration!!?? –  Ahmed Said Apr 1 '09 at 16:00
    
i'm sorry for the confusion. updated my answer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 '09 at 16:06
1  
What an incredible answer. This was the exact problem with MY code also. Crazy that you diagnosed it based on a guess. –  Raptormeat May 3 '12 at 18:21
    
+1 psychic debugging –  James Brock Aug 16 '12 at 8:06
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