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I have a class that works with database in PHP. the Add function in this class is:

    function Add($post_id)
    {
        if(!is_numeric($post_id))
        {
            return 1181;
        }

        $query  = "...";
        $result = mysql_query($query, $this->link);
        return $result;
    }

I also have a page that gets a form data and passes them to this class. The page code is:

$result = $obj->Add($post_id);

if($result == 1181)
{
    echo 'invalid';
}
else if($result)
{
    echo 'success';
}
else
{
    echo 'error';
}

the returned value is 1 and the output must be 'success', but i get 'invalid' message. If i swap 'invalid' and 'success' conditional statements, everything works well, but i want to know that what's this problem for?

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And what's the input? How are we supposed to deduce the problem if we don't know what $post_id is? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 18:04
2  
It looks to me like you should be using exceptions, not returning numbers like "1181". What does that number mean? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 18:05
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: $post_id is a digit value. i didn't use from Exceptions because i wanna prevent sql injection and i also have some other codes after checking $post_id. everything is normal but i dont know that what is this problem... –  Novice Aug 14 '11 at 18:14
2  
I don't see the correlation between Exceptions and SQL injection. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 14 '11 at 18:17
2  
@Novice: Exceptions and SQL injection are completely orthogonal. "i didn't use from Exceptions because i wanna prevent sql injection" makes no sense. And tell us the exact, specific value of $post_id instead of giving us meaningless vague nonsense. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

var_dump($result); is a good starting point. in boolean context 1181 will be converted to true, so just because it prints success don't expect that it succeeded.

You probably pass the wrong post_id. Enable displaying warnings and notices. Don't use crazy magic constants, use false or throw an exception. Always check the return value of mysql_query.

If you do that I don't have to guess and you can make progress and ask meaningful questions.

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+1: Quite right. This is the best answer possible for this question at present. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 14 '11 at 18:20
    
1181 is true but i check it with equality operator. this condition is false because the returned value is 1. all right? im used from numbers because i have so error numbers in this method, like "invalid email". i can't show all of them with false value. of course i changed it to using Exceptions –  Novice Aug 14 '11 at 18:39
1  
@Novice: assert var_dump( true == 1181 ). This answer is correct. You should use the strict equality operator var_dump( true === 1181 ) if you want the result that you expect. –  Decent Dabbler Aug 14 '11 at 18:45
    
let's be pragmatic: var_dump($post_id); var_dump($result); –  Karoly Horvath Aug 14 '11 at 18:46
    
thanks guys. 1)for the main problem as dear fireeyedboy says, i used from identical operator and it works well 2) i changed the main code to using Exceptions against returning numbers... –  Novice Aug 14 '11 at 19:01

Like others have pointed out in the comments, you should be using Exceptions in these types of cases. Here's an example.

function Add($post_id)
{
    if(!is_numeric($post_id))
    {
        throw new InvalidArgumentException( 'Argument should be numeric' );
    }

    $query  = "...";
    $result = mysql_query($query, $this->link); 
    return $result;
}

try
{
    $result = $obj->Add($post_id);
}
catch( InvalidArgumentException $e )
{
    /* handle the invalid argument exception */
}

if($result)
{
    echo 'success';
}
else
{
    echo 'error';
}

Furthermore, if you insist on using codes for your errors, you might use this:

function Add($post_id)
{
    if(!is_numeric($post_id))
    {
        throw new InvalidArgumentException( 'Argument should be numeric', 1181 );
    }

    if($post_id <= 0)
    {
        throw new InvalidArgumentException( 'Argument should be larger than 0', 1182 );
    }

    $query  = "...";
    $result = mysql_query($query, $this->link); 
    return $result;
}

try
{
    $result = $obj->Add($post_id);
}
catch( InvalidArgumentException $e )
{
    switch( $e->getCode() )
    {
        case 1181:
            /* handle the invalid argument exception with code 1181 */
            break;
        case 1182:
            /* handle the invalid argument exception with code 1182 */
            break;
        default:
            /* handle other invalid argument exceptions */
            break;
    }
}

Lastly, like others have commented also, exception handling has nothing to do with, and does not interfere with preventing SQL injection.

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