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This code will compile correctly:

import Text.Printf
import Test.HUnit
doubleMe x = x + x
doubleUs x y = doubleMe x + doubleMe y
doubleSmallNumber x = if x > 100 then x else x*2
doubleSmallNumber' x = if x > 100 then x else x*2 + 1
conanO'Brien = "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!"
main = do
  runTestTT $ TestList [TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleMe 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 10 $ doubleUs 2 3,
                        TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleSmallNumber 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 1000 $ doubleSmallNumber' 1000,
                        TestCase $ assertEqual "" "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!" conanO'Brien]
  where ae = assertEqual "" 

The output is:

$ clear && ghc baby.hs && ./baby     
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( baby.hs, baby.o )
Linking baby ...
ld: warning: could not create compact unwind for .LFB3: non-standard register 5 being saved in prolog
Cases: 5  Tried: 5  Errors: 0  Failures: 0

When I change the code to:

import Text.Printf
import Test.HUnit
doubleMe x = x + x
doubleUs x y = doubleMe x + doubleMe y
doubleSmallNumber x = if x > 100 then x else x*2
doubleSmallNumber' x = if x > 100 then x else x*2 + 1
conanO'Brien = "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!"
main = do
  runTestTT $ TestList [TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleMe 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 10 $ doubleUs 2 3,
                        TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleSmallNumber 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 1000 $ doubleSmallNumber' 1000,
                        TestCase $ ae "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!" conanO'Brien]
  where ae = assertEqual "" 

I get:

[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( baby.hs, baby.o )

baby.hs:12:65:
    No instance for (Num [Char])
      arising from the literal `1000'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Num [Char])
    In the first argument of `doubleSmallNumber'', namely `1000'
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `doubleSmallNumber' 1000'
    In the second argument of `($)', namely
      `ae 1000 $ doubleSmallNumber' 1000'

I don't understand why.

Also does anybody have any ideas for fixing the ld warning:

ld: warning: could not create compact unwind for .LFB3: non-standard register 5 being saved in prolog
share|improve this question
    
What operating system/architecture are you on? The linker included with Xcode for OS X 10.7 produces quite a few warnings in conjunction with GHC. –  acfoltzer Aug 14 '11 at 18:31
    
I am running Snow Leopard on a MacBookPro8,2. I installed GHC with homebrew. Would installing Haskell from source fix the ld warning? –  Vanson Samuel Aug 14 '11 at 18:39
    
I don't remember encountering linker problems on Snow Leopard, but I use the Haskell Platform installation for day-to-day hacking. It might be worth trying that, but I don't want to lead you on a goose chase. –  acfoltzer Aug 14 '11 at 19:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is an example of the monomorphism restriction. ae "looks like a value" (doesn't have arguments) and doesn't have an explicit type, so compiler won't infer a polymorphic type for it.

In first example, it gets type Int -> Int -> Assertion (I think).

In the second, from ae "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!" conanO'Brien it gets the type String -> String -> Assertion. Remember that the type of integer literals is actually Num a => a, and 1000 gets type String from ae, so the compiler needs an instance Num String.

EDITED: This can be fixed by giving an explicit type annotation: where ae :: (Show a, Eq a) => a -> a -> Assertion = assertEqual "". Or by adding arguments to definition (eta-expanding it): where ae x y = assertEqual "" x y.

share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent explanation. I will give the function a type, and see what happens. –  Vanson Samuel Aug 14 '11 at 19:00
    
It is called the monomorphism restriction, not the polymorphism restriction (even though it restricts polymorphism). –  augustss Aug 14 '11 at 19:08
    
Oops. I do know this, don't understand how I managed to misname it. –  Alexey Romanov Aug 14 '11 at 20:20
    
Not giving the correct type for ae is worse. –  Alexey Romanov Aug 14 '11 at 20:21
    
@augustss: One of these days I should hack GHC to add -XPolymorphismRestriction as an extension. Who needs monomorphic bindings, anyway? :] –  C. A. McCann Aug 15 '11 at 12:45

It's the monomorphism restriction. The ae function is assigned a monomorphic type. Either turn off the restriction or give ae a type signature.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I turn off the restriction? –  Vanson Samuel Aug 14 '11 at 19:00
    
You can pass -XNoMonomorphismRestriction on the command line or put {-# LANGUAGE NoMonomorphismRestriction #-} at the top of the file. –  augustss Aug 14 '11 at 19:10

@augustss and @Alexey Romanov are correct. You can see the inferred type for ae if you move it to the top level and remove the last assertion:

*Main> :t ae
ae :: Integer -> Integer -> Assertion

If you keep ae in the where clause, but add a type signature with a more general type, it will work:

main = do
  runTestTT $ TestList [TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleMe 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 10 $ doubleUs 2 3,
                        TestCase $ ae 4 $ doubleSmallNumber 2,
                        TestCase $ ae 1000 $ doubleSmallNumber' 1000,
                        TestCase $ ae "It's a-me, Conan O'Brien!" conanO'Brien]
  where 
    ae :: (Show a, Eq a) => a -> a -> Assertion
    ae = assertEqual "" 
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I needed. Thanks! –  Vanson Samuel Aug 14 '11 at 19:45

Just to add a footnote, it's overloading that's ruled out by the monomorphism restriction. So, this is ok

foo :: String -> b -> b
foo _ b = b

goo :: (Int, Bool)
goo = (moo 2, moo True) where moo = foo "boo"

but this isn't

hoo :: Eq b => String -> b -> b -> Bool
hoo _ b c = b == c

ioo :: (Bool, Bool)
ioo = (moo 2 2, moo True True) where moo = hoo "boo"

Parametric polymorphism is permitted (and has no performance overhead)!

share|improve this answer
    
Well, parametric polymorphism has performance overhead since it requires boxing (the way it's typically implemented), but we need that for lazy evaluation anyway. But the performance hit is nothing like what you get with overloading. –  augustss Aug 14 '11 at 19:29

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