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With Java 7 they finally implemented the diamond operator which lets you omit the repetition on initialization when working with generics.

E.g. List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

This looks pretty convenient as it avoids writing "useless" code. It seems so useful that I'm curious why wasn't this implemented when generics were introduced.

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closed as not constructive by templatetypedef, adarshr, Don Roby, foobar, Michael Petrotta Aug 14 '11 at 22:29

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they didn't do a lot of things. time and resource constraint. –  irreputable Aug 14 '11 at 22:24
    
And I'm curious why Java would take such a useless path instead of just omitting the duplication altogether as VB .NET and C# allow (var x = new ArrayList<string>() or Dim x As/= New ArrayList(Of String) –  Jeff Aug 14 '11 at 22:24
    
I don't think anyone here can answer this definitively unless they were on the committee that actually designed the Java programming language. It's an interesting question, but I think that it can't be given a good answer without getting feedback from a very small set of people. –  templatetypedef Aug 14 '11 at 22:25
    
Because they didn't think of everything? Because people aren't perfect? Because hindsight is 20-20? I don't think there was a deliberate decision to omit it originally. –  Jim Garrison Aug 14 '11 at 22:25
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Because I asked them not to! –  adarshr Aug 14 '11 at 22:26

1 Answer 1

It is a question similar to asking "why was the cordless ever developed? Why didn't we just develop the cell phone instead?". The answer is "necessity is the mother of invention". When generics were designed the necessity was to design a programming construct that did what generics so successfully did. Now the necessity was to maximize developer productivity, hence the invention of the diamond operator.

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