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I am wanting to build a basic theme with a default config file and then I want to build sub themes with config files that are merged with the master theme. Should I use the Kohana::config class to manage this or would it be best to handle this manually by including the config array and merging it with the master config? So far I haven't been able to get the config files to load at all because I've got them located within their own directory.

Basically What I'm trying to do is setup a structure like:

application
|--> classes
     |--> myclass
          |--> myclass.php  // default parent class. Loads the config
          |--> config.php   // array of default config settings
          |--> theme
               |--> blue
               |    |--> blue.php   // extends myclass.php
               |    |--> config.php // merges over the default config settings
               |--> red
               |    |--> red.php    // extends myclass.php
               |    |--> config.php // merges over the default config settings
               |--> green
                    |--> green.php  // extends myclass.php
                    |--> config.php // merges over the default config settings

So I can then call something like:

$theme = new Myclass_Theme_Red_Red();

and have the theme loaded with the default configs from Myclass_Myclass and then have the red theme merged over the defaults. I hope this make sense.

So what is the best way of handling config settings within this sort of structure - or is there a better approach entirely? I don't want to move all the config files into application/config as I would prefer them to be kept with the individual themes.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd put the config files into a config directory which is a sibling of the classes directory.

So your new directory structure would be:

application  
 |- classes  
 |- config (your files go in here)
 |-- theme (and can be in their own namespaced directory)
 |--- green  
 |--- red  
 |--- blue

This is where your configuration files should always go. If you need to do something which Kohana doesn't support then you can add a custom config reader in your (modules) bootstrap [1].

Kohana::$config->attach(new Kohana_Config_File);

[1] Attaching a new config reader in Kohana

A common example would be to load config files from a sub-directory which can be achieved with:

Kohana::$config->attach(new Kohana_Config_File);
Kohana::$config->attach(new Kohana_Config_File('config'.DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR.Kohana::$environment));

This allows me to use different config settings per environment with Kohana.

If you desperately want to keep your config files with the classes you might want to make each theme a separate module.

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Thanks for the response. :) I think you're right about keeping all the configs where Kohana is wanting them to be kept. At this stage I've just created a class variable called $config and am including the config array in the class constructor. Sub-themes are then simply added to the mix: $new_config = include("config.php"); $this->config = $new_config + $this->config; So basically using a standard array rather than a config array. –  Das123 Aug 15 '11 at 19:16

If you desperately want to keep your config files with the classes you might want to make each theme a separate module.

There is no need to make each theme a separate module. Actually, it makes more sense to have one folder per module with your themes.

Say you have a module, and inside that module you have a themes directory.

my-module
 |- classes  
 |- config (your module's config files go in here)
 |-- my-module.php  
 |- themes (in own directory)
 |-- green  
 |--- config
 |---- green-config.php
 |-- red  
 |-- blue

Then you could load the config file like this:

Kohana::$config->attach(new Kohana_Config_File('themes/green/config'));
$config = Kohana::$config->load('green-config');
echo $config->test; //Hello World!

The contents of your green-config.php

<?php defined('SYSPATH') or die('No direct access allowed.');
return array('test'=>'Hello World!');

Also, to quickly test if a file is accessible to Kohana:

Kohana::find_file('themes', 'green/config/green-config');
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