Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Well I guess I'll start off by saying that I don't even know if it is possible, however I feel it is and have failed to find anything on it. I may be missing something blatantly obvious however I'd like to be able to do something like this:

#mymodule
var = None

def load():
    var = something()

Other module(s):

#secondmodule
import mymodule
mymodule.load()

#thirdmodule
from mymodule import var
print var #Shouldn't be None

But I don't know how to reference a modules variable from a function defined in the module.

Is this possible? Or am I going to need to put a global declaration in every place I wan't to use this. Or am I going at this completely wrong?

Any help is appreciated, Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Just change

def load():
    global var
    var = something()

Global variables are read-only from sibling methods. More accurately unless a variable is specified as global, Python consider it as local, but a read access to a local variable name will reach module-level scope if the name is not present in local scope.

See also use of “global” keyword in python and the doc for more details about the global statement

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense and worked beautiful, I'd vote you up, but I'm not at 15 yet. Thanks. –  dennmat Aug 15 '11 at 0:51
    
You are welcome :) –  Evpok Aug 15 '11 at 14:11
    
@dennmat Don't use global variables. If you think you need them it is usually a sign that your design is flawed. –  schlamar Nov 15 '12 at 7:31
    
@Evpok -1 for not pointing that out. –  schlamar Nov 15 '12 at 7:32
4  
@schlamar Is it a joke? This is ugly, a newcomer wouldn't understand it any better than global, it unnecessarily expose complex module mechanics, and it requires the import of sys, all this just to comply to a questionable dogma, and word of God says “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.”. I prefer global. –  Evpok May 19 '13 at 10:46

You seem to mostly have it. You are missing only the fact that "module-level" variables are called global in Python. (They are not truly global, but only global to the module they are declared in, in other words.)

In any function where you modify a global variable (you want to make the name refer to a different object), it must be declared global. So your load() function needs a global var at the beginning. If you are only using the value of a global variable, or if it is a mutable type such as a list and you are modifying it, but not changing the object that the name points to, you needn't declare it global.

The import statement is, as you have discovered, how you can import a module-level variable from one module into another.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the prompt reply, that was in-fact the solution, helps me understand globals and pythons stacks a little bit more now. –  dennmat Aug 15 '11 at 0:54
    
This answer my doubt, . If you are only using the value of a global variable, or if it is a mutable type such as a list and you are modifying it, but not changing the object that the name points to, you needn't declare it global. Thanks @kindall! –  swdev Apr 15 at 10:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.