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I created a simple test jar executable file, but when I tried to run it, it wouldn't work because it said that the Main-Class manifest attribute from jar.jar wouldn't load. The manifest file (which was called manifest.mf) I typed up looked like this: Main-Class: JarTest

and the compiler command looked like this:

jar cmf manifest.mf jartest.jar *.class

any help would be greatly appreciated.

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None of us can telepathically look inside your jar file and see whether it ended up containing a JarTest.class file at the top level, so we can't help you with this. –  bmargulies Aug 15 '11 at 1:10
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How did you try to run your java program? like Behrang said it should be java -jar jartest.jar, also, tells us exactly what java said when you tried to run your program and it didn't work. –  Kevin S Aug 15 '11 at 1:43

2 Answers 2

The manifest file is case-sensitive and it should be named META-INF/MANIFEST.MF.

To execute the JAR file, you should run java -jar jartest.jar.

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I decompressed the jar file to see if I could figure out what the problem was, and the MANIFEST.MF was saved in the directory 'META-INF'. However, when I opened it with textedit to see if it was different from my original manifest.mf, it was. –  user858819 Aug 15 '11 at 1:23
    
I don't know what you are doing, but you can write the manifest file yourself and add it to META-INF manually. This way it will always be the same under all platforms. –  Behrang Aug 15 '11 at 1:25

It's good to learn how to do this manually. As a debugging aid, you can use this handy utility to examine your JAR's manifest, as built. It's also an example of how to use ant to create your manifest in a way that leaves less room for error.

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